NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
1:45 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Pope Francis: What Happens After A Papal Election

After Argentine Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected as the 266th pontiff, he chose the name Pope Francis. His installation Mass could come early next week.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 3:53 pm

As news spread that the chimney atop the Sistine Chapel was billowing white smoke to signal the election of Pope Francis, anticipation built for the new pontiff's first appearance on the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:24 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

On Message: The Battle To Define 'Balanced' Budget

A member of the House Budget Committee holds a copy of the Republican budget proposal on Tuesday in Washington.
Gary Cameron Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 3:12 pm

In the ongoing Washington budget battles, one word gets more of a workout than most: balanced.

This single word illustrates the vast distance between the parties. Democrats and Republicans are working from very different definitions of the term in discussing their budget proposals being unveiled this week.

What Democrats are saying: A balanced budget is deficit reduction through a mix of tax increases and spending cuts. As in: We want a balanced approach to reducing the deficit.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:13 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Who Is Pope Francis?

Argentine Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio during a mass for Ash Wednesday, opening Lent on February 13, 2013 at the Metropolitan Cathedral in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 6:41 pm

The new pope, 76-year-old Jorge Bergoglio, the archbishop of Buenos Aires, is the first pontiff from Latin America and the first Jesuit, but he appears to hold views very much in line with his predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI.

Bergoglio has chosen the papal name Francis, becoming the 266th to hold the title of spiritual leader of the Catholic Church.

Read more
Religion
1:10 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Cardinals Elect Argentina's Jorge Mario Bergoglio As New Pope

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 1:18 pm

Cardinals at the Vatican chose Argentine cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio as the new pope. He will take the papal name Francis and is the first pope from South America. NPR's Neal Conan talks with guests about the significance of the event around the world.

The Two-Way
11:42 am
Wed March 13, 2013

VIDEO: White Smoke, Bells Signal New Pope Has Been Selected

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 12:08 pm

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:38 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Dengue Fever No Longer Just A Visitor To Florida Keys

If you catch dengue fever in the Western Hemisphere, it most likely came from the Aedes aegypti mosquito.
Muhammad Mahdi Karim Wikimedia.org

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 8:02 am

If you're heading down to Florida for spring break, consider packing bug spray and long-sleeve shirts.

After a 60-year hiatus, the mosquito-borne illness dengue fever officially re-established itself there.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:16 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Boy Scouts Sends Its Members Detailed Survey About Gay Ban

In Mississippi last month, scouts took part in a flag retirement ceremony.
Philip Hall / Enterprise-Journal AP

The Boy Scouts of America has sent a detailed survey about its exclusion of gay members to 1.1 million scouts.

As The New York Times reports, the survey doesn't just pose a simple yes or no question on whether the Scouts should lift its ban on gay members and leaders. Instead it seeks answers using detailed hypotheticals.

The Times explains:

Read more
Pope Conclave Update
11:14 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Argentina's Cardinal Bergoglio Is The New Pope; He Will Be 'Francis'

Pope Francis as he waved to the crowd in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on Wednesday.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 5:11 am

The world's 1.2 billion Roman Catholics have a new spiritual leader, and for the first time it is someone from the Americas.

As afternoon turned to evening in Vatican City on Wednesday, a little after 7 p.m. local time, white smoke rose from a chimney above the Sistine Chapel and bells rang through St. Peter's Square — the traditional signals that the church's cardinals have chosen a new pope.

Read more
Europe
10:59 am
Wed March 13, 2013

German Prince Plans To Put Bison Back In The Wild

European bison, or wisents, keep a safe distance from human visitors to their enclosure on the property of Prince Richard of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg in Germany's densely populated state of North Rhine-Westphalia.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 2:17 pm

A small herd of European bison will soon be released in Germany's most densely populated state, the first time in nearly three centuries that these bison — known as wisents — will roam freely in Western Europe.

The project is the brainchild of Prince Richard of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg. He owns more than 30,000 acres, much of it covered in Norwegian spruce and beech trees in North Rhine-Westphalia.

For the 78-year-old logging magnate, the planned April release of the bull, five cows and two calves will fulfill a decade-old dream.

Read more
Politics
10:40 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Second Chances In American Politics

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 12:57 pm

From the ongoing budget battle to Sen. Carl Levin's retirement announcement, NPR's Political Junkie Ken Rudin recaps the week in politics. NPR's Phillip Reeves provides an update from Rome as cardinals elected a new pope.

The Two-Way
10:09 am
Wed March 13, 2013

The Ale That Men Brew: Iron Maiden Serves Up A Beer

Iron Maiden lead singer Bruce Dickinson samples his band's latest offering, Trooper ale, made with what he calls "our special secret-squirrel recipe."
Iron Maiden Beer

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 1:12 pm

Three decades after giving the world The Number of the Beast, Iron Maiden is poised to release its latest work — and it's a beer. That's the latest from the Metal Injection website, whose "Bands and Booze" section makes it uniquely qualified to present such news.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:00 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Pew: Americans Who Identify As 'Strong' Catholics At Four-Decade Low

A procession begins a Mass of Remembrance at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in 2011 in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 11:48 am

The percentage of American Catholics who identify as "strong" members of the church has declined to a 40-year low.

That's according to new analysis of the General Social Survey by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life.

Read more
Author Interviews
9:44 am
Wed March 13, 2013

A Young Man Gets 'Filthy Rich' Boiling, Bottling Tap Water

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 10:16 am

In his new novel, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, Mohsin Hamid's nameless protagonist is an ambitious young man who moves from the countryside to a megalopolis in search of his fortune. The city is modeled on Lahore, Pakistan, where Hamid was born and partly raised and where — after living in the United States and England — he has now settled with his family.

Read more
Music Reviews
9:26 am
Wed March 13, 2013

The Moving Sidewalks: Where The British Invasion Met Texas Blues

Before ZZ Top, Billy Gibbons (second from right) was in the more psychedelic Moving Sidewalks.
Rancho Deluxe Productions

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 11:22 am

There must be something in the water — or the beer — in Texas that caused the huge eruption of garage bands and psychedelic bands in the mid-1960s, because there sure were a lot of them, and their records on obscure labels have kept collectors busy for decades. Most of them were amateurs, but the Coachmen, who came together around 1964, were different.

Read more
Wisdom Watch
9:23 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Write A Little Every Day, You'll Have A Book

Samantha Loomis Paterson

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 8:51 am

Katherine Paterson is the beloved author of many young adult novels, including Jacob Have I Loved, The Great Gilly Hopkins and Bridge to Terabithia.

The American Library Association recently honored her with the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for her "substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children."

Paterson, who has been writing for a half-century, tells NPR's Michel Martin that despite all the awards she has received throughout the years, this one means a lot.

Read more

Pages