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The Two-Way
4:13 am
Tue August 27, 2013

'Syrian Regime Is Responsible,' White House Says Of Attack

In Aleppo, Syria, on Monday, this Free Syrian Army fighter stood in the rubble of a building that has collapsed during fighting there.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 10:18 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Diplomat Frederic Hof speaks with David Greene about the crisis in Syria

(We added a new top to this post at 1:15 p.m. ET.)

"Anyone who approaches this logically" would conclude that the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad is responsible for last week's chemical weapons attack near Damascus that reportedly left hundreds dead and thousands more injured, White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters early Tuesday afternoon.

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Around the Nation
3:52 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Cafe Customers Complain About Early Christmas Music

Shoppers always complain the Christmas season begins earlier every year. And this year, those lunching at Pret A Manger cafes in New York City were treated to Christmas carols starting last week. Only the location in Rockefeller Center managed to override the apparently mistaken holiday tunes coming from corporate headquarters.

Latin America
2:17 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Thousands Of Striking Teachers Disrupt Mexico City

The teachers are protesting education changes that would institute evaluations and reduce the power of unions in hiring educators. It's common practice for teachers in Mexico to buy and sell tenured positions. The protests in Mexico City have caused traffic mayhem, and at one point blocked access to the international airport.

Sports
2:13 am
Tue August 27, 2013

USA Swimming To Review Sexual Misconduct Prevention Program

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The sport of swimming is back in the news, with new questions being raised about whether swimming has effectively confronted a sexual abuse problem, a problem that's been revealed in recent years. USA Swimming - the sport's governing body in this country - announced an independent review of Safe Sport, their organization's program to protect athletes from sexual abuse. NPR's Tom Goldman reports.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: In the spring of 2010, swimming's secrets emerged in a flurry of media reports.

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Around the Nation
2:02 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Residents Of Hot Weather States Sweat Air Conditioning Bills

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Air conditioning is increasingly becoming a necessity, not a luxury, as the number of Americans living in the Sunbelt grows. In Arizona, many people are struggling to keep up with their utility bills. The federal government does have an energy assistance program, but funding is shrinking, and it favors cold weather states that need heating help.

From member station KJZZ in Phoenix, Jude Joffe-Block reports.

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NPR Story
1:59 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Last Tennis Major Underway In New York's Flushing Meadows

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:07 am

It's the first week of the U.S. Open and tennis fans are jazzed. Renee Montagne talks to Jon Wertheim of Sports Illustrated about defending champs Serena Williams and Andy Murray. He also discusses the prospects of lesser known players.

NPR Story
1:59 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Israeli Support For U.S. Military Action Against Syria Grows

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 5:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Syria shares a border with Israel and the two countries have never signed a peace agreement after fighting a war 40 years ago. Still, their border has been stable and the Israeli view of U.S. military action against Syria is complicated and centered largely on another regional player, Iran. To learn more, we turn to NPR's Emily Harris in Jerusalem. Good morning.

EMILY HARRIS, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

MONTAGNE: So does there seem to be any consensus in Israel about what it would like to see the U.S. do?

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NPR Story
1:59 am
Tue August 27, 2013

U.S. Aims For International Support In Action Against Syria

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:36 am

Secretary of State Kerry has pronounced an all-but-final U.S. verdict against the Syrian government for suspected use of chemical weapons in an "indiscriminate slaughter" of civilians. U.S. warships are within missile range, and U.S. envoys are talking to allies to see what kind of action they might support. David Greene talks to Frederic Hof, who was a special State Department adviser on Syria for the Obama administration. He is now a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council.

The Salt
12:21 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Turning Off The Spigot In Western Kansas Farmland

An irrigation pivot waters a corn field in Nebraska. Many farmers in Nebraska and Kansas rely on irrigation to water their corn fields. But the underground aquifer they draw from will run dry.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 11:49 am

Across the High Plains, many farmers depend on underground stores of water, and they worry about wells going dry. A new scientific study of western Kansas lays out a predicted timeline for those fears to become reality. But it also shows an alternative path for farming in Kansas: The moment of reckoning can be delayed, and the impact softened, if farmers start conserving water now.

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Europe
12:01 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Beachgoers In Spain Face Invasion Of Jellyfish

Marine biologist Stefano Piraino thinks overfishing is one of the reasons jellyfish populations are growing. He said if you take fish out of the oceans, it leaves more food for jellyfish. The jellyfish here are known as Pelagia noctiluca, the mauve stinger.
Courtesy of Stefano Piraino MED-JELLYRISK

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 11:01 am

Blue turquoise waves lap at white sand on the Spanish island of Formentera in the Mediterranean Sea. Sweaty tourists from all over Europe cram the beach. But on this particular afternoon, no one dares take a cool dip in the water.

The reason? It's what Spaniards call "medusas" — named after the monster from Greek mythology, with a woman's face and venomous snakes for hair. In English, they're called jellyfish.

Gabrielle Amand's son was a recent victim of one. He's wrapped in a towel, sitting under an umbrella on the shore.

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The March On Washington At 50
12:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Clarence B. Jones: A Guiding Hand Behind 'I Have A Dream'

Clarence B. Jones this month in Palo Alto, Calif. As Martin Luther King Jr.'s attorney and adviser, Jones contributed to many of King's speeches, including his famous speech at the March on Washington in 1963.
Norbert von der Groeben Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 1:59 pm

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream Speech" Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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The Salt
12:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Tortellini, The Dumpling Inspired By Venus' Navel

Even in Sandro Botticelli's painting The Birth of Venus, the goddess's belly resembles a plump, firm tortellino.
Wikimedia.org

Originally published on Sat August 31, 2013 1:38 pm

Tortellini — small circles of rolled dough folded around a filling — are one of the most renowned members of the Italian pasta family. In the land of their birth, the region near the Italian city of Bologna, they're strictly served as broth-like dumplings.

Possibly no foodstuff in Italian cuisine is surrounded by so much history and lore.

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Music Interviews
11:03 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Goodie Mob: Building New Leaders From The Elders

Goodie Mob, left to right: Cee-Lo, T-Mo, Big Gipp, Khujo.
Bridger Clements Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 12:01 pm

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Determining Poverty Line
9:16 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

A College Kid, A Single Mom, And The Problem With The Poverty Line

Marion Matthew is a home health aide supporting herself and her 17-year-old son.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 2:02 am

The College Kid

Rico Saccoccio is a junior at Fordham University in the Bronx. He's from a middle-class family in Connecticut and he spent the summer living at home with his parents, who cover about $15,000 a year in his college costs.

According to the U.S. government, Saccoccio is living in poverty. The $8,000 he earns doing odd jobs puts him well below the $11,945 poverty threshold for an individual. In fact, the U.S. Census Bureau recently reported that more than half of all college students who are living off campus and not at home are poor.

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The Two-Way
4:24 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Justice Backs Less Protective Ruling On Reporter Privilege

In a case closely watched by the intelligence community and the media, the Justice Department urged a federal appeals court on Monday to leave in place a court ruling that gives reporters little protection from testifying against their sources in criminal prosecutions.

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