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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Poll: Americans, Chinese Harbor Mutual Suspicions

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 11:05 am

As President Obama and his Chinese counterpart prepare for a weekend summit in California to discuss thorny bilateral issues, a new poll shows that ordinary Americans and Chinese increasingly eye one another with suspicion.

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The Two-Way
10:03 am
Fri June 7, 2013

California Nuclear Plant Slated For Permanent Shut Down

The San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station at San Onofre State Beach in a 2012 photo.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 10:54 am

California's San Onofre nuclear power plant will be shut down for good amid concerns as to whether it could be safely restarted after being offline since early last year because of a radiation leak.

The plant's operator, Southern California Edison, said in a statement Friday that San Onofre's twin reactors "had served the region for over 40 years" but that the 16 months of uncertainty about whether they would or wouldn't go back online "was not good for our customers, our investors or the need to plan for our region's long-term electricity needs."

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The Salt
9:47 am
Fri June 7, 2013

On National Doughnut Day, Free Food And Feel-Good History

The cover of the Salvation Army's War Cry magazine from 1918 commemorates the "Doughnut Girl."
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:43 am

We here at The Salt tend to look at themed food holidays with a heavy dose of skepticism. Most of these days sound more like marketing schemes than true reasons for a national day of remembrance.

So we were pleasantly surprised to learn that there is a bona fide historical reason to chow down on a deep-fried pastry today to mark National Doughnut Day.

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Night Stalker' Richard Ramirez Dies In Prison

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 10:38 am

Richard Ramirez, the serial killer known as the Night Stalker, has died of natural causes in California, the AP reports, citing corrections officials.

KRON-TV reports that Ramirez was on death row in California's San Quentin prison. The station adds:

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Nobody Is Listening To Your Telephone Calls,' Obama Says

President Obama on Thursday in Mooresville, N.C.
Davis Turner EPA /LANDOV

In his most extensive comments so far on the revelations this week about the electronic data that the nation's spy agencies are collecting, President Obama told the American people Friday that "nobody is listening to your telephone calls."

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Oregon Genetically Modified Wheat
9:28 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Careful Purveyors Of Seeds Say Mistakes Still Happen

Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 3:19 pm

There’s been a lot of speculation but few answers so far about how genetically modified wheat ended up in an Oregon field. Northwest farmers and seed purveyors say they go to great lengths to keep each variety of grain distinct, tracked and pure. And yet they concede, mistakes can still happen.

"A random isolated occurrence"

We’re in downtown Connell – prime Columbia Basin wheat country. Dana Herron is a seed salesman and as we talk I notice he’s a really clean guy. He carefully folds his paper napkin, and later he dons gloves to pump gas.

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Radioactive Mud
9:28 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Swallows Bring Radioactive Soil Into Hanford Waste Plant

Bechtel

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 10:07 am

Workers are back on the job at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation’s waste treatment plant. Work stopped this week when radioactive soil was found under the nests of some swallows.

Swallows used some radioactive mud to make nests on exposed beamwork in Hanford’s waste treatment plant. That’s the $12 billion factory designed to bind-up radioactive sludge in glass logs. The nests were found during routine tests, but this is the first radioactive contamination of the new plant.

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'I Didn't Want To Be Pope,' Francis Tells Group Of Children

Pope Francis speaks with Jesuit school students Friday at the Vatican.
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Speaking to a huge group of children Friday at the Vatican, Pope Francis pushed aside a set of prepared remarks to talk directly to them and answer some of their questions.

One of his frank responses to a girl named Teresa was this: "Anyone who wants to be Pope doesn't care much for themselves, God doesn't bless them. I didn't want to be Pope," reports Reuters.

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The Two-Way
9:03 am
Fri June 7, 2013

As Tropical Storm Andrea Heads North, East Coast Is Drenched

A map showing the amount of rainfall forecast during the next 24 hours.
National Weather Service

The Eastern Seaboard is getting drenched this morning, as Tropical Storm Andrea moves north along the coast.

Check out this rainfall map put out by the Weather Prediction Center:

It shows that in the next 24 hours, a wide swath of the Mid-Atlantic will get hammered with about 3 inches of rain and New York may see close to 4 inches.

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Middle East
8:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Opposition Spokesman Won't Commit To Syria Peace Talks

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 1:53 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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Economy
8:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Are There Jobs Out There For Recent Grads?

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 1:53 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we speak with a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who just lost his job after 44 years at the Chicago Sun-Times. But first, speaking of jobs, the latest figures are out from the Department of Labor. The U.S. economy added 175,000 jobs last month. That's the good news. The bad news is the unemployment rate rose to 7.6 percent. How does that math work? We're going to talk about that.

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Arts & Life
8:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Photo Staff Firings Won't Shake Pulitzer Winner's Focus

The Chicago Sun-Times made a surprise announcement last week: it fired its entire photography staff. Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist John White worked there for more than forty years. He talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about what this news means for him personally and the future of photojournalism.

BackTalk
8:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Senator Clarifies Alleged Ties To White Nationalist Group

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 1:53 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now it's time for Backtalk, that's the time when we hear from you. Editor Ahmad Omar is with us today. What is going on?

AHMAD OMAR: Celeste, we have a little clarification. In our political chat last week, we talked about a staff shakeup for South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley. The co-chair of her reelection committee resigned over connections to the Council of Conservative Citizens. The Southern poverty Law Center calls that a white nationalist group.

HEADLEE: The CCC.

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Barbershop
8:56 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Is It A Surprise That The Government Is Monitoring Your Calls?

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 1:53 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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NPR Story
8:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Strengthening Buildings In Tornado Alley

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 10:33 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. Powerful storms this spring: tornadoes like the ones in Oklahoma have caused damage estimated in the billions of dollars and dozens of deaths. But does the destruction have to be so devastating? What are the engineering challenges to designing and building stronger, more tornado-resistant structures and providing better protection for the people who live there?

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