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Geologists for the state of Oregon are warning of the risk of major landslides in parts of the Columbia River Gorge that were hit by wildfires this year.

A new report released Thursday focuses on areas of the Gorge that are highly susceptible to landslides—which also happen to overlap with some of the areas hit by this year’s wildfires.

Oregon Supreme Court Justice Jack Landau will step down at the end of this year. He announced his retirement in a letter to Oregon Gov. Kate Brown.

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Oregon Supreme Court Justice Jack Landau will step down at the end of this year.

Landau announced his retirement in a letter to Oregon Gov. Kate Brown on Tuesday.

“I have been honored to serve the people of this state and its justice system for 25 years as a judge on the Oregon Court of Appeals and as a member of the Supreme Court,” he wrote.

When 2-month-old Isaac Enrique Sanchez was diagnosed with pyloric stenosis, a condition that causes vomiting, dehydration and weight loss in infants, his parents were told that their son's condition was curable. The problem was that no hospital in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas had a pediatric surgery team capable of performing the operation on his stomach.

Republicans' complex health care calculations are coming down to simple math.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell needs 50 of the chamber's 52 Republicans to vote for a bill that aims to repeal most of the Affordable Care Act and drastically reshape the Medicaid system. McConnell's office is planning to bring the bill up for a vote next week.

Six members of Oregon’s congressional delegation want assurances that federal immigration agents will not target DACA recipients for arrest and possible deportation.

Oregon's four Democratic representatives and two senators wrote a joint letter to Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials Wednesday.

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It's been over a week since Hurricane Irma tore through the Caribbean and southern Florida, but the recovery has been slow.

In Miami, some neighborhoods didn't have electricity for 10 days. 

WLRN reporter Nadege Green lives in one of those areas, and before the power returned, she noticed that a sense of community was forming as people were forced to cook outside on charcoal grills.  

Russia puts Kalashnikov on a pedestal

21 hours ago

Russia is putting Kalashnikov on a pedestal, literally and metaphorically.

Literally, a statue of Mikhail Kalashnikov, the inventor of the iconic AK-47 rifle, was unveiled in downtown Moscow on Tuesday. Metaphorically, the Kremlin is pushing his rifle as “a true cultural brand of Russia.”

The Kalashnikov rifle, in all its forms, is the most popular weapon ever made. It's killed more people than any other single weapon, including the atomic bomb. And yet, now you can buy Kalashnikov tchotchkes at a special souvenir shop at the Moscow International Airport.

Boxer Jake LaMotta, the former world middleweight champion and the inspiration for the movie Raging Bull, has died at age 95. His longtime partner Denise Baker told NPR that LaMotta died Tuesday from complications of pneumonia.

Raging Bull, directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert De Niro, won an Oscar for De Niro and is now regarded as a modern classic. It vividly depicts LaMotta's struggles in his career, as well as some of the domestic violence that the boxer has admitted to perpetrating.

With Hurricane Maria still smashing up Puerto Rico, the economic costs of this year's hurricane season continue to grow by the minute. It will take a while for economists to tally it all up.

But this much already is clear: The recent enormous storms have taken a toll on the housing industry.

Three separate industry reports, issued over the past three days, have all shown that rough weather in the South and wildfires in the West have been creating problems for this key economic sector.

Rescue teams are frantically working to save people trapped by rubble after a powerful earthquake hit Mexico Tuesday.

The 7.1 magnitude quake was centered about 100 miles from Mexico City, but caused about 45 buildings in the capital to collapse.

When the fourth-graders in Mrs. Marlem Diaz-Brown's class returned to school on Monday, they were tasked with writing their first essay of the year. The topic was familiar: Hurricane Irma.

By the time I visited, they had worked out their introduction and evidence paragraphs and were brainstorming their personal experiences. To help them remember, Mrs. D-B had them draw out a timeline — starting Friday before the storm. Then, based on their drawings, they could start to talk about — and eventually, write about — what they experienced.

In Mexico City and surrounding areas, rescuers are still searching for casualties and survivors of Tuesday's earthquake. More than 200 people are believed to have died.

Geologically speaking, Mexico City is not built in a very good place.

This is the second big quake in Mexico in less than two weeks. It came 32 years to the day after another deadly quake. And there will be more in the future, though when is anyone's guess.

The literary magazine American Short Fiction has been published for over twenty-five years. In that time, it's featured works by authors such as Joyce Carol Oates, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Louise Erdrich; it's been nominated for national awards, and its works have been published in The Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. 

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Courtesy of Jericho Road Community Health Center

Beginning life in a new country as a refugee is not easy. Culture shock can kick in over food, languages — or health care.

For some women from conservative Muslim families, US health care practices can clash with what they’re used to. Reporter Sarah Varney went to Buffalo, New York, a city that is increasingly accepting refugees from countries such as Somalia, Syria and Iraq, to speak to some women who are in that position. 

The Federal Reserve on Wednesday said it will hold short-term interest rates steady for the time being. But the central bank said that in October it will begin to unwind the extraordinary stimulus it used to battle the Great Recession.

Fed Chair Janet Yellen has said the process will be gradual. But over the long run, the plan will put upward pressure on consumer interest rates, including for car loans and mortgages.

A Neglected Family Of Killer Viruses

22 hours ago

We think of HIV, TB and malaria as some of the deadliest infectious diseases on earth. And the death tolls bear that out.

But there's a family of viruses that is in the same league: hepatitis viruses.

There are five of them. Their alphabet soup of names tells us the order in which they were discovered: hepatitis A, B, C, D and E. According to a new report from the Global Burden of Disease, the viruses kill 1.34 million people a year.

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Now the story of a senator and a late-night host in a public feud over this health care bill.

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The boxer whose life was immortalized in the film "Raging Bull" has died. Jake LaMotta died yesterday in a Florida hospital. NPR's Tom Goldman remembers the former middleweight champion and his complicated life.

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Oregon Faces Steep Cuts Under New Republican Health Care Plan

22 hours ago

Momentum in Congress is building again to take another shot at repealing the Affordable Care Act, but a new analysis shows Oregon could lose big if the latest plan gains approval.

The bill, known as the Cassidy-Graham bill — named after the sponsoring senators from Louisiana and South Carolina — would cut government health spending dramatically.

From Texas Standard:

Certain events in history have changed the lives of Texans forever. The Great Storm of 1900 in Galveston is still the deadliest hurricane on record. On a day in Dallas, in 1963, a nation lost a president. In 1966, a shooter atop the UT Tower terrorized a city by committing the first mass murder on a college campus. And now Harvey. These defining moments are embedded in the memories of those who lived them, but for everyone else, we rely on the written record.

A federal program that provides health insurance for about 390,000 Texas children must be reauthorized by Congress by the end of the month.

Jeff Mateer, a high-ranking official in Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton's office who President Donald Trump has nominated for a federal judgeship, said in speeches in 2015 that transgender children are part of "Satan's plan" and argued same-sex marriage would open the floodgates for "disgusting" forms of marriage, according to CNN.

The massive earthquake rattled through Mexico City at about 1 p.m. local time Tuesday, razing buildings and filling the air with thick clouds of dust. As residents left their offices and homes, dozens of which sustained severe damage or collapsed entirely, the sun was glaring high in the sky.

It was midday, and the children were still in school.

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