It's All Politics
12:34 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

How Ohio Could Swing The Election

A campaign charter flight carrying Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan arrives in Ohio, which has seen nearly nonstop visits from the candidates in recent weeks.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 1:52 pm

Kentucky may be the site for tonight's debate between the vice presidential candidates, but the monster swing state of Ohio remains the focus of White House dreams for President Obama and Mitt Romney.

Both the incumbent and his challenger have been in and out of the state with increasing frequency; GOP vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan plans a trip to the Buckeye State on Friday, after his tangle with Vice President Joe Biden.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Panda Cub's Death Due To 'Lung And Liver Damage'

Mei Xiang at the National Zoo earlier today. Her cub died last month.
Rod Lamkey Jr. The Washington Times /Landov

The giant panda cub born at Washington's National Zoo did, as first suspected, die on Sept. 23 because of "lung and liver damage" stemming from problems with her development, zoo officials say.

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Music Recommendation
12:26 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Timeless Protest Songs From The Inspirational Elaine Brown

Elaine Brown
(Image courtesy of Pat Thomas)

Local record producer and writer Pat Thomas recently compiled a collection of music written by and for the Black Power movement,  "Listen, Whitey! The Sounds of Black Power 1965–1975." One of the musicians he discovered in putting the album together is a woman named Elaine Brown. She was the head of the Black Panther party during the mid '70s. Today, she's most well known for her activism for prisoners, but Pat thinks her music from the late '60s and early '70s has a message that still applies today.  He recommends listening to "Seize The Time," "The End of Silence" and "Until We're Free."

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The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Very Fancy: Scientists Detail A Diamond Encrusted Super-Earth

Illustration of the interior of 55 Cancri e — an extremely hot planet with a surface of mostly graphite surrounding a thick layer of diamond, below which is a layer of silicon-based minerals and a molten iron core at the center.
Haven Giguere via Yale University

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 3:39 pm

Scientists have discovered a world much fancier than our homely, little Earth.

New research that will published in the journal Astrophysical Journal Letters details a planet that is eight times heavier than Earth and with twice its radius. But instead of being covered in water and granite, it is encrusted in graphite and diamond.

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Asia
11:42 am
Thu October 11, 2012

A Shooting Foreshadowed By Taliban Threats

Malala Yousafzai is treated in a hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan, after she was shot on Tuesday.
ISPR EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 1:00 pm

A 15-year-old Pakistani schoolgirl remains in critical condition after being shot in the head for defying the Taliban and championing the right of girls to go to school. Malala Yousafzai rose to prominence during the recent war in Pakistan's Swat Valley by writing a blog under a pen name. NPR's Philip Reeves reported on that war — and twice met Malala's father. Reeves sent this account of the tough world in which Malala spent her childhood.

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Mental Health
11:32 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Bringing People Back From The Brink Of Suicide

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 11:55 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Travel
11:27 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Who Is Rick Steves?

Rick Steves (left) and Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn on stage at Hempfest, 2011.
Jen Nance, Office of the Mayor Flickr

Travel guru Rick Steves has made his way into many a knapsack with his essential travel guides, but how did he first begin his travel business and what inspired that career? Ross Reynolds sits down with Rick Steves and goes beyond travel to hear his story. 

Economy
11:26 am
Thu October 11, 2012

How We Got To The Edge Of The Fiscal Cliff

As the end of the year draws near, politicians and economists are again warning of the consequences of the "fiscal cliff." David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, sorts through the politics and numbers to explain how the government came to the precipice of the fiscal cliff.

Maureen Corrigan, book critic for NPR's Fresh Air, is a critic-in-residence and lecturer at Georgetown University. She is an associate editor of and contributor to Mystery and Suspense Writers (Scribner) and the winner of the 1999 Edgar Award for Criticism, presented by the Mystery Writers of America.

Corrigan served as a juror for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. So We Read On, her forthcoming book on the extraordinary "second act" of The Great Gatsby, will be published by Little, Brown in September 2014.

Opinion
11:05 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Op-Ed: Women, Stop Trying To Be Perfect

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 11:54 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

No woman can have it all, words that may come as a surprise from the president of one of the country's premier women's colleges. In an article in Newsweek, Deborah Spar, president of Barnard, says women's liberation created incompatible expectations: the perfect wife and mother who breastfeeds and whips up sachertorte for the bake sale and puts in a 60-hour week in a high-power job. Women, she argues, need to acknowledge biological differences, stop striving for perfection and start recruiting others, men and women, to build happier lives.

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