Media
3:17 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Conservative Media Caught in the Blame Game

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 4:08 am

In the wake of last Tuesday's elections, a lively debate has erupted into the open over whether conservatives and the Republican Party were well-served by their favorite media outlets.

Former Gov. Mitt Romney was reported to have been so certain of a victory on Tuesday night that he cast aside tradition and did not draft a concession speech. But conservatives now say his misplaced confidence β€” and theirs β€” were bolstered by the predictions of many like-minded pundits, which were broadcast and posted online around the clock by sympathetic news outlets.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Thousands of Iranian Troops Will Participate in 'Biggest Ever' Military Drill

Iran has initiated a massive week-long air defense drill amidst growing international pressure over its nuclear ambitions and last week's firing on a U.S. drone they claim entered Iranian air space.

Iran will test its air defense system, named "Mersad," meaning ambush in Persian. Drill spokesman Shahrokh Shahram told Iran's Press TV the military exercise was both a "strong warning to those threatening Iran" and a symbol of regional security, according to Reuters.

Read more
Europe
2:30 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

A German City With Debt Problems Of Its Own

The main street in Oberhausen β€” Germany's most indebted city β€” is dotted with vacancies. Despite its economic woes, Oberhausen, like other western German cities, must make "reunification" payments to the former communist East. The payments help explain German voters' reluctance to bail out Greece and other eurozone countries.
Patrik Stollarz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 5:31 pm

Germany, the economic engine of Europe, has been a key player in bailing out the Continent's most troubled economies.

Yet there are places in the former West Germany β€” like Oberhausen β€” that are struggling with their own debt problems, even as they pay hefty sums to revitalize former East German cities with transfers known as "Solidarity Pact" payments.

Borrowing To Stay Afloat β€” And Pay Out

Read more
The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Salman Rushdie, John Le Carre End Literary Feud

Author Salman Rushdie at The New Yorker Festival in New York on Oct. 7.
Todd France AP

It began with a war of words in the letters pages of the Guardian and ended with comments made to The Times of London. It took 15 years, but, as the Guardian reports, the feud between writers Salman Rushdie and John le Carre is at an end.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:16 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

People From 20 States Ask To Secede On White House Website

A fan holds up the Texas state flag during Game Two of the ALCS during the 2010 MLB Playoffs.
Stephen Dunn Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 8:06 am

They're asking politely. Malcontents from 20 different states are petitioning the White House to allow them to secede from the union.

Using the White House website's We the People function, in which petitions garnering at least 25,000 signatures get a response from the president, people from the state of Texas are asking to "peacefully ... withdraw from the United States of America and create its own NEW government."

Read more
Arts & Life
2:00 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Exploring The Backstories Of Seattle Artists

Cartoonist Ellen Forney
Jacob Peter Fennell

In this special hour-long edition of Art of Our City we explore stories from Puget Sound poets, illustrators, singers and more. They share the inspirations behind their work, and in some cases what they hope people will gain from it.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:41 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Parenting A Child Who's Fallen 'Far From The Tree'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 5:09 pm

When Andrew Solomon started his family with his husband, John Habich, he says, people were surprised that he wasn't afraid to have children, given the topic of the book he was writing. That book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity, explores what it's like for parents of children who are profoundly different or likely to be stigmatized β€” children with Down syndrome, deafness, autism, dwarfism, or who are prodigies, become criminals, or are conceived in rape.

Read more

FormerΒ WRVO/Central New York reporter for the Innovation Trail.

Emma Jacobs is a native of Boston. She studied history, so she went for more practical training in public radio at NPR member-stations WNYC and WBUR. She helped shape Wired's Haiti Rewired project, a 2010 Knight Batten Innovations in Journalism Awards notable initiative.Β 

The Salt
1:28 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Kind of Like 'eFarmony': Matching Farmers With Urban Landowners For Fun And Profit

Chris Costa and one of her chickens on her farm in Downingtown, Pa. Costa and her partner, T.J., found the land for this farm through a sustainable agriculture program.
Emma Lee WHYY

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 3:15 pm

Many farmers want their farms to be located close to a city - especially organic farmers who'd like to sell their produce at big urban farmers markets. But the price of land within range of a big city is sky high and only getting higher.

Most small farmers buy their land, but some are now looking to lease in suburban or exurban areas. And to do that, they're using something straight out of Fiddler On The Roof: A matchmaker.

Read more
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
1:28 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Post-Sandy, Residents Gut Hard-Hit Rockaway

Volunteers help to clean up in the heavily damaged Rockaway neighborhood where a large section of the iconic boardwalk was washed away.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 3:36 pm

Ferry service into Manhattan started Monday for the Rockaway section of Queens, one of the hardest-hit New York City neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy. Many residents are still feeling cut off, struggling without power or adequate public transportation options. And now worries about mold are creeping in.

But the new ferries were a small consolation for the trickle of commuters who trudged onto Manhattan soil for the first time in two weeks. Some of them, like Sheila Curran, were grinning all the way down the plank.

Read more

Pages