Privacy
10:00 am
Thu November 1, 2012

US Supreme Court Considers Electronic Eavesdropping

US Supreme Court.
Credit (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The Supreme Court hears arguments this week on Clapper v. Amnesty International, a case that will decide whether or not the federal government can be sued for wiretapping U.S. citizens. The Atlantic's Garrett Epps is following the hearing and shares his findings with us.

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Election 2012
9:37 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Why The White House Glass Ceiling Remains Solid

The presidency has remained a male-only office throughout American history. Despite changing demographics and huge gains by women in other walks of life, some experts still don't see a female president on the horizon.
Joshua Roberts Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 11:50 am

Will the United States ever elect a woman president?

When President Obama — or Mitt Romney — leaves the Oval Office, there will be a handful of highly touted female candidates for consideration as top-of-the-ticket nominees for both major parties.

On the Republican side, the list includes Sen. Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire and Govs. Susana Martinez of New Mexico, Nikki Haley of South Carolina and maybe even Sarah Palin of Alaska.

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The Two-Way
9:12 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Former Penn State President Graham Spanier Charged In Sex Abuse Scandal

Former Penn State University president Graham Spanier speaks during a news conference.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 9:40 am

Pennsylvania Attorney General Linda Kelly just announced that former Penn State President Graham Spanier has been charged in connection with the child sex abuse scandal that has rocked the university.

According to Onward State, an online news outlet covering Penn State, Spanier is facing eight charges ranging from perjury to endangering welfare of children to conspiracy.

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Other
9:00 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Debating R-74: Should Washington State Allow Same-Sex Couples To Marry?

Wedding rings.
Credit Flickr photo/Michael Verhoef (CC BY-NC-ND)

Earlier this year, Washington state Governor Chris Gregoire signed a bill allowing marriage rights for same-sex couples. Opponents gathered enough signatures to force a public referendum, and the law was put on hold. Now, it's up to voters to decide. If Referendum 74 is approved, Washington state will be the first in the country to uphold gay marriage at the ballot box. Should same-sex couples have the same rights to marry as straight couples? Author and civic entrepreneur Eric Liu and Preserve Marriage Washington spokesman Chip White join us.

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Law
8:56 am
Thu November 1, 2012

O'Dea HS Principal Resigns Amid Sex Abuse Claims

A member of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests outside Seattle’s O’Dea High School.
Credit Christine Beaderstadt

This story has been updated since it was first published.

A member of the Christian Brothers religious order who served as principal at Seattle’s O'Dea High School has resigned. Brother Karl Walczak is being accused of sexually abusing a minor in Chicago about 40 years ago.

The school is operated by the Christian Brothers but owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Seattle.

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Shots - Health News
8:55 am
Thu November 1, 2012

How An Antibody Found In Monkeys Could Help Make An Ebola Vaccine

A microbiologist runs an experiment to count hemorrhagic fever viruses at the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.
Scott Smith CDC

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 11:34 am

Just the word Ebola can send shivers down the spine.

And no wonder.

Ebola is one of the deadliest viruses around, and there aren't any approved treatments or vaccines for it.

Scientists have been experimenting with an Ebola vaccine in animals for the past few years, but they've been stymied. There's no easy way to test its effectiveness in people.

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Children's Health
8:45 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Tips On Explaining The Storm To Young Ones

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 9:03 am

Millions of Americans are dealing with the aftermath of Sandy, including the responsibility of comforting children who may not have a frame of reference for the storm. For tips on helping kids cope, host Michel Martin speaks with Suzanne McCabe of Scholastic's classroom magazines. The magazines cover the aftermath of all kinds of disasters.

NPR Story
8:43 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Voter Fraud Billboards Stir Controversy

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 8:45 am

Billboards declaring "Voter Fraud is a Felony" were recently taken down in some urban Ohio and Wisconsin areas. But not before civil rights groups said they could intimidate minority voters and decrease turnout. Host Michel Martin talks with WCPN reporter Brian Bull about the billboards, who paid for them, and concerns about their lasting impact.

NPR Story
8:43 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Sandy Raises Concerns For Nation's Infrastructure

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 9:03 am

The cleanup effort is underway after superstorm Sandy, and questions are cropping up about the country's aging infrastructure. Henry Gomez reports for The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. He put his questions to President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney well before the storm hit. He speaks with host Michel Martin, as part of NPR's "Solve This" series.

NPR Story
8:43 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Who Is Native American, And Who Decides That?

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 9:03 am

More than five million people in the U.S. claim some form of Native American identity, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. November is Native American Heritage Month and host Michel Martin kicks it off with the first in a series of conversations with author Anton Treuer. He talks about who is Native American and how that identity is determined.

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