Lexington native Brenna Angel anchored local morning newscasts for WUKY through May 13. She joined the station in March 2010 after previously working for WHAS-AM in Louisville.

Her work has been honored by the Hearst Foundation, the Radio Television Digital News Association, and the Associated Press. Several of Brenna’s stories have aired on NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Brenna accepted a position with the Lexington Mayor's Office in May 2013.

Author Interview
11:04 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Jon Ronson Discusses His Wacky Experiences In Journalism

Journalist Jon Ronson
Alexio's pics Flickr

Journalist Jon Ronson has interviewed a wide array of interesting characters, ranging from the hip-hop duo, Insane Clown Posse, to a man who tried to split the atom in his kitchen. Ronson is the bestselling author of "The Psychopath Test" and "The Men Who Stare at Goats."

Ross talks to him about his new book, "Lost at Sea," where he discusses his journalistic endeavors and demonstrates just how intriguing the human race can be, for example, local vigilante Phoenix Jones.

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Future Of Books
11:02 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Are Traditional Libraries In Jeopardy?

Do you think libraries have a future?
emdot Flickr

Thousands of librarians are gathering in Seattle for the annual ALA Midwinter Meeting, and they've got a lot to talk about. Ross Reynolds spoke with ALA President Maureen Sullivan about the future of libraries and how they survive in a digital age.

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The Business Of Marijuana
10:57 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Potrepeneurs Visit Seattle

Today investors from around the world are convening to discuss investments in cannabis-related products. The ArcView Group, a San Francisco investment consulting company, is hosting the meeting. And this time, the focus won't be on the growth and sale of marijuana. Instead, it's about all the other related products: lights for growing, portable cases for joints, etc. Ross talks to Roy Kaufman from ArcView for details.

International News
10:00 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Douglas Foster On South Africa After Mandela

Douglas Foster's 'After Mandela: The Struggle For Freedom In Post-Apartheid South Africa.'
Credit Courtesy/Liveright

Capitalism, democracy and HIV all arrived at about the same time in South Africa, where the promise of the Mandela era has still not been met. The nation struggles with an epidemic of poverty, illness and violence. Can the next generation of leaders reshape its cultural and political realities? Douglas Foster, author of "After Mandela: The Struggle for Freedom in Post-Apartheid South Africa," joins us.

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Gun Buy Back
9:20 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Seattle's Gift Cards-For-Guns Event Sells Out

A plastic bin of assorted guns turned in by people in exchange for gift cards at Seattle's first gun buyback event in 20 years.
Allie Ferguson

Hundreds of people came out on a chilly Saturday morning to exchange their guns for $100 and $200 Amazon.com gift cards in the first guy buyback event held in Seattle in 20 years. People stood in line holding rifles in camouflage cases and shot guns wrapped in blankets among other things. Traffic clogged up city streets near the parking lot where the event took place.

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Education
9:00 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Seattle Considers School Funding Levies

If it passes, Proposition 1 would give Seattle Schools money for day-to-day needs like books, transportation and student activities.
Credit Flickr photo/Michael Porter

Next month, Seattle voters will be asked to renew two expiring levies to fund Seattle Public Schools. Proposition 1 would raise nearly $552 million over three years to fund day-to-day expenses like textbooks, transportation and student activities. Proposition 2 would raise nearly $695 million over six years to pay for building renovations, earthquake safety improvements and security cameras. The two levies combined would cost the owner of a $400,000 home an additional $152 per year in property taxes. Should Seattle voters renew the levies? We'll take up Prop 1 and Prop 2.

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Online Piracy
5:26 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

The Day The Internet Went Dark And How It Changed History

A protester in Madrid, Spain, wears a Guy Fawkes mask associated with the hacker group Anonymous. A hacker claiming association with the group took down MIT's website to post a memorial to Internet activist Aaron Swartz.
Credit flickr/gaelx

A little over a year ago, Wikipedia, Google and thousands of other websites went dark. They were protesting an Internet privacy act being considered in Congress. It was the largest protest ever conducted on the Internet. And it worked.

One of its organizers was Aaron Swartz. Swartz advocated for the Internet to be free. His quest for free information got him in trouble.  He was caught trying to leak academic papers to the public. The US Department of Justice tried to make an example out of him. But he committed suicide.

Today, we hear an in-depth report on Swartz’s most successful campaign: the online protest that stopped SOPA, the Stop Online Piracy Act, from becoming law.

Other Stories on KUOW Presents, January 28, 2013:

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Radio History
2:44 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

The Rise Of KUOW And Public Radio In Seattle

Volunteers from Group Health answer phones for a KUOW pledge drive.
Group Health

KUOW recently began its seventh decade on the air in Seattle. All this week we’ve been looking back at the history of radio in the Puget Sound Region. Today, Feliks Banel explores how local public radio has evolved over that last 30 years as a result of changes in commercial radio and the rise of national programming.

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Mental Health
12:40 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

Why Are Women More Depressed Than Men?

Flickr Photo/Majicdolphin

Women around the world are 2 to 6 times more likely than men to suffer from depression. Today Ross talks to author Dana Jack about her new book “Silencing the Self Across Cultures,” where she explores the reasons for the troubling sadness and silence of women across the globe.

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