Food And Feelings
5:25 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Washington High Court Finds Spit-Covered Burger Could Cause Emotional Distress

A sullied burger is at the center of a Washington Supreme Court opinion. No burgers were harmed in the taking of this picture.
Flickr photo/Doran

“Under Washington law, is a consumer entitled to emotional distress damages when a fast-food employee spits in his or her hamburger even though the consumer did not eat the hamburger?” The Washington Supreme Court said Thursday that the answer may be yes.

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Classical Music
5:14 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Schubert And The Minimalists: Savoring The Journey

Seattle Weekly music writer and composer Gavin Borchert.
Credit Courtesy/Gavin Borchert

  

The old saying “it’s about the journey, not the destination” is one that comes to mind when listening to the music of Franz Schubert. Seattle Weekly music writer and composer Gavin Borchert has been thinking a lot lately about Schubert and the distinctive way the composer’s music slowly unfolds over time. To Gavin’s ears, Schubert, an early 19th century composer, has a strong kinship with American minimalist composers of the 20th and 21st centuries. That kinship is explored in a new recording called “The Knights:  A Second of Silence.”

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Unpaid Internships
4:50 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

The Movie Studio Intern Who’ll Never Work In Hollywood Again

Interns compete in the "Intern Olympics" at an advertising agency in St. Louis, Missouri.
Credit Flickr/lolololori

Many industries depend on a steady stream of unpaid interns. In the movie industry, interns are lured by the chance to work alongside big stars or important directors. The dangled promise of a future career keeps them glued to their computer workstations late into the night.

Eric Glatt found himself in such a position. He looked into the law, and began to suspect his employer’s reliance on interns was illegal. So he sued. Hear his story today on KUOW Presents.

Other stories from KUOW Presents on February 1:

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Social Media
3:11 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Episode 36: RadioActive Is In A Relationship With Facebook

Credit Molly Freed

In RadioActive's first podcast of 2013, hosts Antonia Dorn and Ann Kane bring us a story from producer Molly Freed who talks about how she learned to have a healthy relationship with her Facebook page. Then we ask the question: Why do you use Facebook?

You'll have to listen to find out what the slang of the month is. Hint: Nicki Minaj.

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Civil Rights
2:00 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Gay And Black, Bayard Rustin Was A Little Too Complicated For The Early Civil Rights Movement

A Portrait of Bayard Rustin
Credit Flickr/Felix Jackson, Jr.

Many people have not heard of Bayard Rustin. Rustin is the man who taught MLK about non-violence, a strategy he’d learned from Gandhi. Rustin organized the 1963 March on Washington. But he was discouraged from being a public spokesperson for civil rights because he was gay. Many activists at the time felt the movement wasn’t big enough to include homosexuality.

We hear about the pattern of public humiliation that kept Rustin out of the history books. And about how he finally found peace when the culture caught up with him.

Other stories from KUOW Presents on Thursday, January 31:

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Transportation
12:40 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Sound Transit’s Trials And Tribulations

Sound Transit CEO Joni Earl at the Sea-Tac Link light rail opening ceremony in 2009.
Atomic Taco Flickr

Sound Transit has been under fire lately for poor budgeting, rider shortages and even for train interruptions due to mud slides. The regional transit provider is the force behind Link light rail in Seattle and Tacoma and the Sounder train, which stretches from Lakewood through Seattle and up to Everett. Their express-bus system serves passengers in King, Pierce and Snohomish Counties. Today Ross talks to Sound Transit Executive Director Joni Earl to find out what the future holds for our regional trains and buses.

In 2013, KUOW presents 13 For '13, in partnership with the Seattle Times. This 12-part series profiles 13 members of the Seattle area’s diverse cultural community, people who have had an impact and are poised to shape the cultural landscape in the decade to come. 

Election Funding
12:20 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Should Seattle City Elections Be Publicly Funded?

What are your thoughts on publicly-funded election campaigns?
marsmet531 Flickr

The Seattle City Council is thinking about developing a publicly-funded approach to campaign finance. The Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission would develop a detailed plan and voters would decide whether to approve it later this year. The idea to use public money to fund city campaigns is meant to open up the political arena to candidates who might not otherwise run for office. On Thursday, city councilmembers will meet with representatives from Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles to see how publicly funded campaigns have played out in their cities.

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Sports
10:00 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Is Football Safe For Kids?

How harmful is playing football to athletes?
Credit Flickr photo/Nathan Rupert

The greatest sports spectacle on Earth takes place this Sunday: the Super Bowl. As millions around the world take in the commercials, the halftime show — and, of course, the actual game — football is facing a crisis. Thirty-three deceased former NFL players have been found to have suffered from a degenerative brain disorder called CTE, brought on by years of head trauma and concussions. Even President Obama has expressed concern, telling The New Republic that if he had a son, “I'd have to think long and hard before I let him play football.” It football safe for kids? We’ll take an in-depth look at the issue with youth football coach Chris Gradwohl and Dr. Kim Harmon of the University of Washington.

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Agriculture Workforce
9:03 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Washington Farmers Encouraged By Senate Immigration Plan

In this Oct. 21, 2011, file photo Margarito Calderon picks apples at an orchard in Tieton, Wash.
Shannon Dininny, File AP Photo

This week, something new is sprouting in the Northwest’s fields and fruit orchards: optimism about immigration reform.

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