Ailsa Chang is a Congressional reporter on NPR's Washington Desk.

Since joining NPR in September 2012, Chang has covered the first major gun control legislation to reach Capitol Hill in two decades, recovery efforts after the devastation of Superstorm Sandy and a multitude of law enforcement issues, including reforms by the overstretched and underfunded police department in Camden, NJ.

Chang spent six years as a lawyer before becoming a journalist. Prior to coming to NPR, Chang was an investigative reporter at NPR member station WNYC from 2009 to 2012 in New York City where she covered criminal justice and other legal issues.

Dennis Caswell
Jack Straw Productions/Sherwin Eng

In "Epiphanette," Woodinville poet Dennis Caswell speculates on what happens to the "carefree cognitive tumbleweed" of his baby daughter's mind when it "is struck by the SUV of enlightenment" in the form of a little epiphany.

Already she baby-knows:
A dance you learn; the dancer you're stuck to.
                                          from "Epiphanette"

flickr photo/ caribbeanfreephoto

It's obvious from his interview with The Guardian newspaper that Andrew Snowden knew leaking NSA secrets would get him into hot water. But he seems to have planned for that. Somehow, he's disappeared from his Hong Kong hotel room. Some have suggested he might find refuge in Russia, on mainland China, or on some remote island in the Philippines.

Christopher Pyle knows a thing or two about blowing whistles. In 1970, while in the U.S. Army, he disclosed the extent of the military's surveillance of the protest movement. That led, in part, to the Watergate scandal. Mr. Pyle now teaches politics at Mount Holyoke College and is the author of several books on military surveillance of civilians. The CBC's Carol Off asked him for insight on Snowden's situation.

Other stories on KUOW Presents,  June 11:

Tech Columnist Monica Guzman On Privacy And "Halfalogue"

Jun 11, 2013

 According to the Pew Research Center, the number of Americans with smart phones has just exceeded the halfway point. But more fancy phones could mean more cell phone theft. A recent Harris Poll showed that one out of every 10 mobile phone users has had their phone stolen at some point.

Seattle Times Tech columnist Monica Guzman had an article in the Sunday paper about smart phone theft specifically. She’s also a writer for GeekWire, and she appears regularly on The Conversation to talk about the latest tech news. This time she discusses cell phones and “halfalogue” with David Hyde.

Are Americans Too Obsessed With Cleanliness?

Jun 11, 2013

Compared to the rest of the world, Americans take hygiene and cleanliness very seriously. But Dr. Ruchi Gupta, a medical school professor and recent author of a New York Times op/ed article, says Americans are taking cleanliness too far. Dr. Gupta tells David Hyde that not all bacteria are bad, and listeners weigh in on the discussion.

Environmental Update With Ashley Ahearn

Jun 11, 2013

 From the Duwamish River cleanup efforts to coal terminals to chuckling frogs; David Hyde talks with KUOW and EarthFix reporter Ashley Ahearn about the latest in Northwest environmental news. Plus, Ahearn talks about EarthFix’s upcoming documentary, "Voices of Coal: And EarthFix Multimedia Special."

 A Trip To The SPD Evidence Warehouse
Crime is in the news every day, and each case has evidence that has to be stored somewhere. The Seattle Police Department’s evidence warehouse is full of guns and drugs as you might expect, but it also houses the unexpected. Items like a massage table, a brass bed, skis and arrows. Katy Sewall takes a peek behind the scenes.

Jerick Hoffer AKA Jinkx Monsoon
Fresh off his win on the fifth season of RuPaul’s Drag Race and ahead of a performance in Hairspray at Seattle’s 5th Avenue Theater, we talk with actor, singer and performer Jerick Hoffer, stage name Jinkx Monsoon.

Greendays Gardening
Our expert gardening panel knows flowers, native plants and vegetables. Have a question? They offer guidance for your garden every Tuesday. Email your question to Weekday.

"Alive And Well," And The Purpose Of Life

Jun 11, 2013

“Alive and Well” At SIFF
The documentary “Alive and Well” takes viewers inside the lives of seven people who have been affected by Huntington’s disease. From those who carry the gene to family members turned caregivers, the film tells the story of what it’s like to live with a genetic, neurological disorder. Huntington’s disease is degenerative, slowly breaking down the nerve cells of the brain. A person with a parent with Huntington’s has a 50/50 chance of inheriting the gene mutation. Director Josh Taft and executive producer Liz Weber  explain their motivation for making the film.

Islam’s “Spiritual Gems”
Nearly a quarter of the world’s population looks to the Qur’an for spiritual guidance. What does the Islamic holy book have to say about life? Katy Sewall talks with Jamal Rahman, author of “Spiritual Gems of Islam.”

Weather and Hike of the Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

This fall, some classes may get harder for public school students — and teachers — across Washington. That's when many districts will roll out new, more rigorous language arts and math standards, known as the Common Core. Washington is one of 45 states that have adopted the same set of K-12 standards.

Some Washington teachers have already started using them. At Sylvester Middle School in Burien, teacher Christy Bowman-White read a poem about a nail-biter basketball shot to her honors language arts class on a recent school day.

The effort to replace the I-5 bridge that collapsed into the Skagit River last month has hit a milestone. On Monday, workers installed the framework for part of a temporary replacement that will eventually support the bridge’s north-bound lanes. There will be a second span to handle south-bound traffic.

Pages