Tom Cole is an editor on NPR's Arts Desk. He develops, edits, produces, and reports on stories about art, culture, and music for NPR's news magazines Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and All Things Considered. Cole has held these responsibilities since February 1990.

Prior to his work with the Arts Desk, Cole worked for three and a half years as an associate producer for NPR's daily classical music program Performance Today, and also for Morning Edition, where he coordinated and edited news reports and produced music programming.

Immigration Reform
2:00 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Marriage As A Path To US Residency: Not So Easy As In The Movies

If you had to place your kids in the car at 3:30 in the morning to commute from Tijuana to San Diego every day, they might look something like this.
Credit Flickr/Jose Chavarry

Marry an American, get residency in the US: It's a myth many Americans still believe, promulgated by sitcoms and romantic comedies. But the true story is much more complicated. And it has left thousands of families trying to remain united as borders divides them. Hear the story of one family that commutes everyday from Tijuana to San Diego. They leave at 3:30 in the morning, their kids asleep in the back seat. Clearly this is not the romantic comedy they expected. 

Other stories heard on KUOW Presents, Wednesday, February 13: 

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Psychology
12:40 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

What Are Your Blindspots?

Cover of 'Blind Spot' by Anthony Greenwald

What are our hidden biases or blind spots, and how can they divert us from doing what we think is right? Ross Reynolds interviews University of Washington psychology professor Anthony Greenwald, co-author of the new book "Blind Spot: Hidden Biases of Good People."

Innocence Project
12:30 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Bill To Compensate Innocent Who Spend Time Behind Bars

Robert Clark opens donated Christmas presents at the Innocence Project's offices in Atlanta in 2005. It's Clark's first Christmas in the free world since he was exonerated of a rape charge by DNA evidence and released from prison.
Ric Feld AP Photo

Yesterday in Olympia the House Judiciary Committee passed a bill that would compensate people who served time in prison for crimes they didn’t commit and were exonerated of. The exonerated people would be given $50,000 for each year spent behind bars. This isn’t the first time this legislation has been proposed but it is the first time that it has bipartisan support. Ross Reynolds takes a closer look at the bill and who it's intended to help.

Business
12:20 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

What Effect Is The Shrinking Public Sector Having On The Washington State Economy?

Nationally the private sector added 5 million jobs since a low point in June of 2009. But during that same time period the public sector cut 721,000 jobs. What effect is the shrinking public sector having on the economy? And what’s the story here in Washington state?

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Olympic Sports
12:07 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Olympics To Drop Wrestling, Northwest Wrestlers Shocked

What's your position on dropping wrestling from the Olympics?
AP Photo/Paul Sancya

This week the International Olympic Committee announced a plan to drop wrestling from the 2020 summer games. But there's some chance the drop could still be stopped. Ross Reynolds interviews former Olympic wrestler Ivan Ivanov who is now based in Idaho, and Seattle Times columnist Ron Judd.

Movies
10:00 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce: Presidents On Film And NW Business News

Canadian pride.
Credit Flickr illustration/Mike Gabelmann

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton looks at presidents on the silver screen. Then, Michael Parks wraps up the region's recent economic news.

Education
9:00 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Can We Still Afford Higher Ed?

Is higher education financially possible for Washington students?
Credit Flickr illustration/Curtis Cronn

Recent debate over the future of the state's pre-paid tuition program and the continually rising cost of college raises a larger question: Who is going to pay for a college education? It used to be that Washington state paid most of the cost of a public university degree. Today, students must find most of the funds. As costs rise, how will society keep higher education affordable? William Zumeta heads the graduate program at the Evans School of Public Affairs and has written about the costs of college. He joins us to talk about how we can make sure people in Washington state can pursue higher education without having to go into crushing debt.

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Clean Energy Development
8:58 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Wash. Gov. Inslee Sets Sights On ‘Defeating’ Climate Change

Governor Jay Inslee (right) joined Capitol Land Trust executive director Eric Erler at the conservation group's annual breakfast in Olympia.
Ashley Ahearn

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee says he wants to defeat climate change. Rather than taxing carbon or pursuing a cap-and-trade system to restrict the emission of greenhouse gases, the Democratic state executive wants more clean energy research and development.

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Bikes As Transit
8:45 am
Wed February 13, 2013

Five Lessons For Seattle Bike Share Plan

Bike Sharing Kiosks in St. Paul, Minnesota.
Flickr/taestell

The plan to create a bike sharing program in Seattle is clicking into a higher gear. Puget Sound Bike Share hopes to launch in 2014 in parts of the University District, Eastlake, Capitol Hill, South Lake Union, Downtown and Queen Anne. Organizers updated Seattle officials Tuesday on their progress and said they hope to hire a vendor by the spring.

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