Tulalip Tribe
12:05 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

From Vietnam To Fisherman: Tulalip Tribe Chairman Mel Sheldon Talks Life Then And Now

Mel Sheldon is chairman of the Tulalip Tribe, but he wasn’t always in politics. Chairman Sheldon fished for 25 years. Before that he worked as a houseboy at two University of Washington sororities. And before that, Sheldon served as a pilot in Vietnam.

Chairman Sheldon says he likes “life on the edge," he likes being busy and he likes working hard. Ross Reynolds talks with Tulalip Tribe Chairman Mel Sheldon about his life, career and hopes for the future.

News & Analysis
10:00 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Canadian flag.
Credit Flickr Photo/Arlo Bates

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton reviews what's happening on the silver screen. Then, Michael Parks wraps up the region's recent economic news.

Education
9:00 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Closing The Opportunity Gap For Students Of Color

Closing the opportunity gap for students.

Trish Millines Dziko co-founded the Technology Access Foundation in 1996 to provide science, math, engineering and technology education for Seattle's students of color. Access to technology has improved since the foundation was created, but many low-income students and students of color still face obstacles to becoming innovators and creators. How can we close the gap so all students have equal opportunities? Can programs like this work in all of our school districts? Trish Dziko joins us.

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Shereen Marisol Meraji tries to find the humor and humanity in reporting on race for the NPR Code Switch team.

Her stories center on the real people affected by the issues, not just experts and academics studying them. Those stories include a look at why a historically black college in West Virginia is 90 percent white, to a profile of the most powerful and most difficult-to-target consumer group in America: Latinas.

Prior to her time with Code Switch, Meraji worked for the national business and economics radio program Marketplace, from American Public Media. There, she covered stories about the growing wealth gap and poverty in the United States.

Poetry
3:22 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Karen Finneyfrock's Monstrous Spring

Poet and novelist Karen Finneyfrock.
Credit Photo Credit/Inti St. Clair

A  Metro bus ride inspires poet, novelist and teaching artist Karen Finneyfrock to find a delightfully surprising personification for Northwest springtime in her poem "Monster."

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Parenting
3:07 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

A Family Made And Unmade

Credit Flickr Photo/sidewalk flying (CC BY-NC-ND)

Mike Checuga and his son Victor defied everyone's expectations. After all, what would a carefree 25-year-old white bachelor know about raising a black kid rescued from an abusive orphanage? Yet the two grew very close.

Victor excelled in the fancy school where Mike managed to find him a berth. He acted out, as many kids would. But Mike laid down the law, sometimes sitting in class next to Victor if that's what it took to keep him in line. But when Victor reached high school, parenting him became much more challenging.

Falling Into A Role

Victor was one of the only black kids in his school, and the white students assumed he could get drugs for them. It was blatant stereotyping. Victor had no history with drugs. But he enjoyed being popular. So he fell into the role. That led to a dark period for the Checuga family.

Victor repeatedly got in trouble with the law. At one point, Mike sort of gave up on Victor. He told Victor, if he was going to keep selling drugs, he should change his name and never have anything to do with him again. And that's where their relationship could have ended. Instead, it paved the way for a remarkable reconciliation, one that left both father and son changed forever.

Other Stories on KUOW Presents, Tuesday, April 16:

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Protecting Pacific Octopus
3:00 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

New Protections Proposed For Octopuses In Puget Sound

A giant Pacific octopus on display at the Seattle Aquarium. The species' population is considered healthy in Puget Sound. Public outcry over legal octopus hunting near Seattle's Alki Beach has prompted possible restrictions.
Flickr/canopic

Right now it’s legal to hunt octopuses in Puget Sound – unless you’re in a marine preserve or conservation area. In fact, if you have a state fishing license you can harvest one every day.

But the killing of a giant Pacific octopus off Alki Beach in Seattle last October prompted a public outcry. Hundreds of scuba divers and members of the public submitted petitions to the state of Washington asking for better protection for the giant Pacific octopus in Puget Sound.

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Seattle Runners Remember
12:48 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Stories From The Boston Marathon Finish Line

62-year-old Jeff Poppe (in red) at the 26-mile mark--about 2 minutes before the explosions.
Credit Photos courtesy Jeff and Anita Poppe

The force of the first blast at the Boston Marathon threw runner Bill Iffrig of Lake Stevens, Wash. to the ground. The photograph of Iffrig has become an iconic image of Monday’s tragedy.

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Seattle City Attorney
12:00 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Why Was Pete Holmes In Copenhagen?

Pete Holmes is Seattle’s city attorney and that means his clients include the mayor, the City Council, the police and the public. Pete Holmes previously worked as a private attorney in Seattle for almost 25 years before being elected city attorney in November 2009. He was also an original member of the Seattle Police Department's Office of Professional Accountability Review Board (OPARB) and served as chairman from 2003 to 2008. Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes about the recent retirement of Police Chief John Diaz, the Department of Justice and what he was doing in Copenhagen. 

Author Interview
11:58 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Has The Internet Turned All Us Davids Into Goliaths?

Cover of 'The End of Big" by Nicco Mele.

According to Nicco Mele the Internet is the great leveler and the age of "big" has ended. Who has power and control when almost everyone has access? Ross Reynolds talks to Nicco Mele about the Internet, the distribution of power and his new book, "The End of Big." 

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