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American History
6:00 am
Mon February 17, 2014

Inside The Presidents Club With Nancy Gibbs And Michael Duffy

Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy's book "The Presidents Club."

Harry Truman and Herbert Hoover were from opposing parties, but they became friends when Truman took office after Franklin Roosevelt's death and needed some advice. This was the start of the 'presidents club,' a shadow organization that began as a joke. These private relationships — and rivalries — among the most powerful men in the country are documented in Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy's book "The Presidents Club: Inside the World's Most Exclusive Fraternity."

Gibbs and Duffy trace the evolution of the presidents club from the end of World War II to Barack Obama. They spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on May 11, 2012.

This interview originally aired on September 6, 2012.

Relationships
3:56 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Modern Love: Misconceptions Of Soul Mates

Daniel Jones' book, "Love Illuminated."

Marcie Sillman talks with Daniel Jones, editor of The New York Times' "Modern Love" column, about his new book, "Love Illuminated: Exploring Life's Most Mystifying Subject (With The Help Of 50,000 Strangers)," and what he's learned about love from other people's stories.

Author Interview
3:02 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Aggrieved Entitlement: New Era For American Masculinity

Michael Kimmel's book, "Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era"

Ross Reynolds talks with Michael Kimmel, a professor of sociology and gender studies at Stony Brook University in New York, about his new book, "Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era." Kimmel says white men have a reason to be angry, but it's often not the reason they think it its.

Mental Health
2:54 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Public Defender Pushes Back On Involuntary Committment Bill

Flickr Photo/Micheal J (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Mike DeFelice, supervising attorney for civil commitments at the King County Public Defender's office, about a proposed bill that would give people more say over the involuntary commitment of a mentally ill family member.

The Week In Review
2:53 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Death Penalty Debate, Bertha Costs, And No Place Like Home

Governor Jay Inslee announced Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014, that he is suspending the use of the death penalty in Washington state, but the moratorium does not commute the sentences of people currently condemned to death.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File

Governor Jay Inslee puts a halt to executions and initiates a debate about the future of capital punishment in Washington state. Meanwhile, state transportation officials continue to explore the cost overruns as repairs to Bertha are expected to take months. And the housing community reviews Seattle's affordability issue.

Steve Scher talks with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Eli Sanders of The Stranger and news analyst Joni Balter about this week's top stories.

Nancy Pearl
1:39 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Joys And Dangers Of Re-Reading Old Favorites

Revisiting books years after the first read can be an interesting experience.
Flickr Photo/Sarah Browning (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with librarian Nancy Pearl about the joys and dangers of re-reading favorite books. Pearl said revisiting a book years after the first read will sometimes force herself to ask, "What did I see in this?” But other times, she is glad to be reunited with an old friend.

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Young And Restless
9:37 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Sleep-Deprived Teenagers? Starting School Later Could Help Them Catch Up

The Seattle School District is considering flipping bell times of high and middle schools with elementary schools.
Flickr Photo/Rico San (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It’s 6:35 a.m. on a recent school day: time for Wendy VanKoevering to do the rounds. Anyone who’s had to wake up a teenager in the morning knows it can be a struggle.

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Department Of Health
9:11 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Washington's New Rules On Hospital Partnerships Challenged

New rules on hospital mergers put undue burden on hospitals, according to the Wash. State Hospital Association.
Flickr Photo/Ralf (CC BY-NC-SA)

The Washington State Hospital Association has filed suit in Thurston County Superior Court over the state's new permitting process for hospitals.

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Poetry
7:20 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Nathan Cummings On Becoming A National Student Poet

First Lady Michelle Obama with the 2013 National Student Poets (from left: Michaela Coplen; Sojourner Ahebee, Nathan Cummings, Louis Lafair, and Aline Dolinh) in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Sept. 20, 2013.
Credit Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson

Elizabeth Austen features Nathan Cummings, a senior at Mercer Island High School, as he reads his poem "Proteus" and describes what being named as one of five National Student Poets in 2013 has meant to him.

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Public Issues
6:00 am
Fri February 14, 2014

To Combat Urination And Littering, Olympia Bans High-Alcohol Sales In Downtown Core

Flickr Photo/Steve Snodgrass (CC-BY-NC-ND)

At $1.39, less than the price of a pack of gum, you can get up to four servings of alcohol at a store selling high alcohol beverages. Starting Saturday, though, that store will have to be located outside of downtown Olympia.

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Capital Punishment
3:08 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Murder Victim's Sister 'Thrilled' For Death Penalty Moratorium

Flickr Photo/Dar (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Karil Klingbeil, whose sister was murdered in 1981, about why she's pleased with the Governor Jay Inslee's suspension of the death penalty. Candy Hemmig was killed by Mitchell Rupe, whose appeals process was so lengthy that he died in prison of natural causes in 2006.

Minimum Wage
3:07 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Income Inequality Advisory Committee Working On Minimum Wage Proposal

Fast food workers and minimum wage advocates marched from SeaTac to Seattle as part of a national demonstration for a $15 minimum wage on December 5, 2013.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Ross Reynolds talks with Howard Wright, co-chair of Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's Income Inequality Advisory Committee, about the status of its proposal to the mayor.

Video Games
2:54 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

New Video Game Centers Around Government Surveillance

The new video game, "Republique," begins with with a phone call from a woman named, Hope.
Camouflaj's Facebook page

Ross Reynolds talks with video game creator Ryan Payton and business director Jeffrey Matthews about their new game, "Republique," out of the Bellevue-based studio, Camouflaj.

Environment
2:45 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Hood Canal Oil Spill: 'No Evidence Of Harm To Wildlife, Environment'

Flickr Photo/EcologyWA (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Lisa Copeland, communications manager for the Washington State Department of Ecology, about the cleanup efforts of the 2,000 gallons of oil that spilled in Hood Canal on Monday.

History
2:45 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Operation Paperclip: How US Recruited Nazi Scientists

Annie Jacobsen's book, "Operation Paperclip."

David Hyde talks with journalist and author Annie Jacobsen's latest book "Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America." The book is the account of more than a dozen German scientists recruited by the U.S. government after WWII.

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