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Nancy Pearl
1:39 pm
Fri February 14, 2014

Joys And Dangers Of Re-Reading Old Favorites

Revisiting books years after the first read can be an interesting experience.
Flickr Photo/Sarah Browning (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with librarian Nancy Pearl about the joys and dangers of re-reading favorite books. Pearl said revisiting a book years after the first read will sometimes force herself to ask, "What did I see in this?” But other times, she is glad to be reunited with an old friend.

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Young And Restless
9:37 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Sleep-Deprived Teenagers? Starting School Later Could Help Them Catch Up

The Seattle School District is considering flipping bell times of high and middle schools with elementary schools.
Flickr Photo/Rico San (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It’s 6:35 a.m. on a recent school day: time for Wendy VanKoevering to do the rounds. Anyone who’s had to wake up a teenager in the morning knows it can be a struggle.

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Department Of Health
9:11 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Washington's New Rules On Hospital Partnerships Challenged

New rules on hospital mergers put undue burden on hospitals, according to the Wash. State Hospital Association.
Flickr Photo/Ralf (CC BY-NC-SA)

The Washington State Hospital Association has filed suit in Thurston County Superior Court over the state's new permitting process for hospitals.

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Poetry
7:20 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Nathan Cummings On Becoming A National Student Poet

First Lady Michelle Obama with the 2013 National Student Poets (from left: Michaela Coplen; Sojourner Ahebee, Nathan Cummings, Louis Lafair, and Aline Dolinh) in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Sept. 20, 2013.
Credit Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson

Elizabeth Austen features Nathan Cummings, a senior at Mercer Island High School, as he reads his poem "Proteus" and describes what being named as one of five National Student Poets in 2013 has meant to him.

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Public Issues
6:00 am
Fri February 14, 2014

To Combat Urination And Littering, Olympia Bans High-Alcohol Sales In Downtown Core

Flickr Photo/Steve Snodgrass (CC-BY-NC-ND)

At $1.39, less than the price of a pack of gum, you can get up to four servings of alcohol at a store selling high alcohol beverages. Starting Saturday, though, that store will have to be located outside of downtown Olympia.

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Capital Punishment
3:08 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Murder Victim's Sister 'Thrilled' For Death Penalty Moratorium

Flickr Photo/Dar (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Karil Klingbeil, whose sister was murdered in 1981, about why she's pleased with the Governor Jay Inslee's suspension of the death penalty. Candy Hemmig was killed by Mitchell Rupe, whose appeals process was so lengthy that he died in prison of natural causes in 2006.

Minimum Wage
3:07 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Income Inequality Advisory Committee Working On Minimum Wage Proposal

Fast food workers and minimum wage advocates marched from SeaTac to Seattle as part of a national demonstration for a $15 minimum wage on December 5, 2013.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Ross Reynolds talks with Howard Wright, co-chair of Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's Income Inequality Advisory Committee, about the status of its proposal to the mayor.

Video Games
2:54 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

New Video Game Centers Around Government Surveillance

The new video game, "Republique," begins with with a phone call from a woman named, Hope.
Camouflaj's Facebook page

Ross Reynolds talks with video game creator Ryan Payton and business director Jeffrey Matthews about their new game, "Republique," out of the Bellevue-based studio, Camouflaj.

Environment
2:45 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Hood Canal Oil Spill: 'No Evidence Of Harm To Wildlife, Environment'

Flickr Photo/EcologyWA (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Lisa Copeland, communications manager for the Washington State Department of Ecology, about the cleanup efforts of the 2,000 gallons of oil that spilled in Hood Canal on Monday.

History
2:45 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Operation Paperclip: How US Recruited Nazi Scientists

Annie Jacobsen's book, "Operation Paperclip."

David Hyde talks with journalist and author Annie Jacobsen's latest book "Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America." The book is the account of more than a dozen German scientists recruited by the U.S. government after WWII.

Police Reform
2:35 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

SPD's New Approach For Treating People With Mental Illnessnes And Drug Addiction

Flickr Photo/Brittney Bollay

Marcie Sillman talks with Bill Hobson, executive director of the Downtown Emergency Service Center, about the Seattle Police Department's new policy for dealing with people who have mental illnesses or drug and alcohol issues. Hobson is also a member of Seattle's Community Police Commission.

Breast Cancer Awareness
2:35 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Stop Getting Mammograms? Not So Fast!

Flickr Photo/Kristie Wells (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Dr. Julie Gralow, medical oncologist at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, about a new study on mammograms.

Tacoma City Council
2:14 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Tacoma Council Member Returns With New Perspective From Marine Training

Tacoma City Councilmember Anders Ibsen.

Anders Ibsen is back in his seat on the Tacoma City Council after returning early from officer training in the Marine Corps Reserves.  

Ibsen, 27, was originally expected to be gone until November of this year but said that he was determined medically unfit to continue training. In an interview with KUOW, Ibsen described the grueling training regimen where the “tempo and intensity never ends.”

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Transportation
1:17 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Legalizing Rideshare: Seattle Council Wrestles With How To Regulate The New Marketplace

A Lyft driver identifies his or her car with a distinctive mustache.
Flickr Photo/Spiros Vathis

Rideshare companies have been flourishing in Seattle – illegally. On Friday, the City Council will consider a new plan to finally regulate taxi-alternatives like Lyft, Sidecar and UberX.

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Hurts So Good
12:00 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

The Science And Music Of Heartbreak

Dr. Helen Fisher studies why after a break-up all we want to do is wallow in sad music.
Flickr Photo/Lis Ferla

There are a lot of songs about love, but perhaps there are even more songs about loss. That raises a serious scientific question: Why are so many songs written about heartbreak, and what happens to the brains of people who are experiencing a really bad break-up?

Biological anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher studies what happens in our brains when we are in love and when we are heart broken. She says that Tylenol is helpful, but staring at pictures of your ex and listening to a sad song when your brain is going through massive dopamine withdrawal is not.

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