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The cover of Mishna Wolff's book, "I'm Down," about growing up as a white girl in South Seattle.
Macmillan

Before there was Rachel Dolezal, there was Mishna Wolff’s dad.

In this 2009 interview, comedian Mishna Wolff tells Steve Scher about her dad, a white man, and how he became a part of Seattle's black community. 

This week's federal drought map shows how widespread the trend is across the West.
David Miskus/NOAA/NWS/NCEP/CPC

As the Northwest drought deepens, millions of dollars in emergency federal aid are headed toward stricken states, top Obama administration officials told seven western governors Friday.

Workers sort through strawberry roots on a planter pulled behind a tractor at Sakuma Brothers Farm in Burlington, Wash.,
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

BURLINGTON, Wash. – On a recent morning at Sakuma Brothers Farm, eight Latino workers sat on a bench seat behind a tractor, planting strawberry roots that will bear fruit in a few years. Dust masks and goggles covered their faces.

There’s a good chance these field workers have joined, or work side by side, with a group calling for a union contract here.

A file picture from Oct. 17, 2008, shows the "B" cell and bunk unit of the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Guaranteed payments to contractors at federal detention centers have helped to create a quota system for immigration enforcement, according to a report released Thursday by advocates for detainees.

Lara Davis is the arts education manager for Seattle's Office of Arts and Culture
Seattle.gov

Once upon a time, when you were young, you probably painted pictures, sang songs and danced yourself dizzy.

Many artists and arts educators believe that making art is second nature to humans. And they believe it helps kids learn. But somehow, by the time children reach their teens, many lose their enthusiasm for creative activities. Experts say that lack of arts curriculum in schools may be to blame.

Jesse Jackson visited Seattle on Wednesday, asking that the tech industry focus on hiring more people of color and women.
KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

Rev. Jesse Jackson called out Amazon during a visit to Seattle on Wednesday.

“The board of the directors is all white in 2015,” Jackson said at Northeastern University’s newest building on South Lake Union. “Our challenge is not just to point the blame, but to point out the solution. Which is inclusion.”

By the end of the year, the Washington State Patrol could need more than 200 new troopers because many are closing in on their retirement.

So the agency is turning to community job fairs as one way to recruit new troopers, as well as other employees.

Seattle moms Sarah Weigle and Julia Crouch and their daughter Maya. Although married in Washington state, Crouch chose to adopt their daughter to protect her status as a parent across the U.S.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to rule on gay marriage this month. The high court decision could mark the end of a complicated legal era in which same-sex couples have had to jump through legal hoops to legally protect their family unit.

In this 2012 file photo, Troy Kelley, the Democratic candidate for state auditor at the time, takes questions at a debate.
Flickr Photo/Daniel Brunell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

State Auditor Troy Kelley is facing another investigation. This time the state is looking into possible criminal activities.

The state’s investigation is separate from the federal charges he currently faces.

Waiting for Laverne Cox to enter the room.
Marlo Mack

As the mother of a young transgender child, my response to Caitlyn Jenner’s headline-grabbing announcement is a visceral one.

Yes, I’m kind of put off by the hype. No, I’m not a big fan of celebrity culture or reality television. But when I look at the cover of Vanity Fair, and read the news articles that respectfully use Jenner’s new name and female pronouns, I’m overwhelmed by this new state of affairs, and by a world that might just be ready to accept my daughter. And that knocks me off my feet with awe and gratitude.

People walk in the May Day labor march in Seattle on Friday, May 1, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Greater Seattle is known as home to some of the world’s most successful corporations including Microsoft and Amazon. But it's also home to some of the most vigorous anti-capitalist protests in the United States. What’s going on here?

Nelida Martinez, one of the farmers growing their businesses at Viva Farms, a farm incubator project
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

  Strawberries, beware. Blueberries and raspberries are ripening early this year.

A warm winter has given way to a hot spring, which means berries are ripening early this year in the Pacific Northwest. That’s great for some growers in the short term – and the rest of us hankering for juicy fruit – but it’s also created competition among farmers.

Left to right: Donald Watts and Professor Eric Davis at Naked City Brewery
Photo credit: Matt Owens

Amateur and professional sports bring out the fan, and sometimes the fanatic, in people worldwide. Athletes are modern-day gladiators. So it shouldn’t surprise us when Bellevue College professor Eric Davis says that “sports is essentially a reflection of the best of who we are and the worst of who we are.”

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW's Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins, about the battle between Republicans and Democrats over the last details of a new state budget. 

Megan Rapinoe is seen in action in 2012.
Flickr photo/kimphotography (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talked to Megan Rapinoe, midfielder for the Seattle Reign FC and the U.S. Women's National Team in 2013 about her career and the future of soccer in the United States. The women's team opens play in the World Cup in Canada on Monday.

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