Courtesy of Dean Forbes, Seattle University

Legendary science fiction writer Ursula K. Le Guin visited Seattle University recently to meet with students and read from her novel "The Lathe of Heaven." The work was chosen as the common text reading for SU freshman and transfer students this year.

Washington's capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC BY NC ND)/

Ross Reynolds talks to journalist Kyung Song about a new report by the Center for Public Integrity that gave Washington state poor marks for government accountability.

José Luis Avila, of Renton, is fighting for the release of his wife Nestora Salgado from Mexico.
KUOW photo/Liz Jones

Human rights activist Nestora Salgado raised her family in Renton. She’s a U.S. citizen and a human rights activist.

But most people know her now as a political prisoner. She’s been held in a Mexican prison for more than two years, with limited outside contact.

photo by Lindsay Thomas

Long before Misty Copeland grabbed international headlines as the first African American woman named principal dancer at American Ballet Theater in New York, Seattle’s Pacific Northwest Ballet was scouting for young people like Copeland: potential dancers who might not find ballet on their own.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Brenda punched through the wall on Friday.

She’s the boring machine that cut a light rail tunnel from Northgate to Roosevelt and now has made it to the future station in Seattle's University District.

Carrie Brownstein: "Sleater-Kinney was a band that wanted to be heard. We had a set of ambitions and sometimes they felt anathema to those politics from which we came."
Autumn de Wilde

Rocker/actress/writer Carrie Brownstein spoke with The Record’s Ross Reynolds about the music scene in Olympia in the 1990s and why she thinks of Portland as a shrug.

Brownstein, of Sleater-Kinney and “Portlandia” fame, has a new memoir, "Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl." She did a reading Friday night at the Neptune Theatre in Seattle.

In this Nov. 3, 2015, photo, the Keystone Steele City pumping station, into which the planned Keystone XL pipeline is to connect to, is seen in Steele City, Neb.
AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama rejected an application to build the Keystone XL pipeline Friday after seven years of federal review, declaring the proposed project wouldn't serve U.S. national interests and would have undercut America's global leadership on climate change.

Mark Kopczak from Spirit Airlines shakes hands with Port of Seattle CEO Ted Fick during the announcement Thursday of Spirit's service to Sea-Tac Airport.
KUOW photo/Kate Walters

A seat: That's all you get when you buy a ticket with low-cost carrier Spirit Airlines. If you want more than that, you pay for it.

Spirit is bringing its bare-bones business model to the Seattle Tacoma International Airport, beginning service there in March.

Tim Eyman
AP Photo/Rachel La Corte

Tim Eyman's latest tax-reducing intitiative, I-1366, passed handily in Tuesday's election.

Eyman talked to David Hyde about why he thought the initiative was necessary and about how he feels to get the victory while he's under investigation over allegations of campaign finance violations.

Prison jail bars
Flickr Photo/Thomas Hawk (CC BY NC 2.0)/

The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world. But that’s a relatively recent development. Over the last three decades rates of incarceration in the U.S. have increased five-fold.

Currently there are about 2.2 million U.S. citizens behind bars. Race and class are major factors in who goes to prison. If current trends continue, 1 in 3 young black men will spend time behind bars. The projected rate for young white men is 1 in 22.

Carlo Voli quit his corporate job a few years ago to become a full time Community Supported Activist. He's been fighting fossil fuels and climate change ever since.
Ashley Ahearn, KUOW/EarthFix

LYNNWOOD, Wash. – Carlo Voli moves through the crowd of protesters outside a recent public hearing in Washington.

He pauses to talk to a woman holding a cardboard cutout of an oil train and directs her over to where a group holding similar train car posters is lining up to complete the phrase “No More Exploding Oil Trains.”

Timothy McCall works in WSDOT's new $17.3 million Northwest Region Transportation Management Center in Shoreline.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Washington has a new Transportation Management Center in Shoreline. That’s the nerve center where engineers help resolve traffic problems.

Before officials showed me the new center, they showed me the building they used to work out of. It looks like an underground missile control bunker from the Cold War era.

A doctor takes a blood sample from an older patient.
Flickr Photo/World Bank Photo Collection (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

American seniors are growing in numbers. But the number of geriatricians, doctors who specialize in treating older patients, is actually shrinking.

And there aren’t enough in the pipeline to meet the growing need.

Elderly couple walking
Flickr Photo/Abdulsalam Haykal (CC BY 2.0)

If you’re an older person, a fall can be devastating. One in every three older adults falls each year, and the risk of falling increases with each decade.

Salmon in the Ballard Locks, Seattle, Washington.
Flickr Photo/goodmami (CC BY SA 2.0)/

The Wild Fish Conservancy sued federal environmental and fisheries agencies Wednesday, saying they inadequately monitor the impact of commercial salmon farms in Puget Sound.

The lawsuit says commercial farms pose many risks to wild salmon.