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Jessica and Blakely Tossey walk along Kent-Des Moines Road. The busy highway does not have sidewalks so Jessica wears a bright-colored sweatshirt.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Jessica Tossey is in the living room of her condo, getting herself and young son Blakely ready for their mile-long walk to church, where he goes to preschool.

Jessica puts on a bright orange sweatshirt, shoulders a backpack, grabs Blakely’s hand, and heads out the door.  

A zombie robot army visualized: sorting through signals from infected computers
The Office for Creative Research

Last week Europol’s European Cybercrime Center led the takedown of a network of computers controlled by cybercriminals. Microsoft played an important role, taking legal action that led to the seizure of servers in four countries — servers that were the command and control centers for millions of infected computers worldwide.

Tacoma Link Light Rail train approaches
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Politicians in Olympia are negotiating the final size of a transportation package. But we found out this week it may not be as much as some people hoped. Transit advocates hope the final package will pay to extend light rail from Seattle to Everett and Tacoma. 

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols went to Tacoma to find out more.

Capitol Hill's Neighbours nightclub.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Hate crimes are up on Seattle’s Capitol Hill, and often they target people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. Tuesday night there was a meeting to discuss the problem. KUOW's Carolyn Adolph reports.

The Navy uses EA-18G Growlers in electronic warfare.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Pacific Fleet (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington state has told the U.S. Navy it can’t use state land to conduct electronic-warfare training on the Olympic Peninsula.

The state Department of Natural Resources gave no reason for the denial, simply saying in a letter that the agency preferred not to partner on the project.

The Navy wants to use mobile electronic emitter trucks on 15 sites on the Olympic Peninsula. The trucks would emit electromagnetic signals for Navy pilots in radar-jamming planes to detect.

Jonathan Murrell said his life spiraled out of control after a car accident in 2012.  He hasn't had housing in years.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Ten years ago this month, King County made a bold promise to end homelessness in 10 years. The ranks of the homeless have declined in Washington state and nationally during that time. But in the Seattle area, the number of people sleeping on the streets and in shelters has only gone up.

Homeless families outside Mary's Place shelter in Seattle
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

If you have an emergency, you call 911.

If you need emergency shelter or housing, you can call 211 – but be prepared to wait six months or more.

In the Seattle area, as throughout the United States, there aren’t enough beds.

Alex Williams, an operator for 211, King County's information line for emergency food or shelter.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

A phone rings in a room full of busy operators at Seattle's Crisis Clinic. Alex Williams answers this one. 

“Good morning, thank you for calling King County 211. My name is Alex. How can I help you today?"

King County 211 is the line members of the public can call for emergency shelter or social services.

A clipboard used for King County's annual One Night Count.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

When a homeless person needs help, they are often asked for a lot of personal information.

For victims of domestic violence, that information could potentially help an abuser track them down. That’s why homeless people in Washington state are given the choice to keep personal information from a big database that service providers keep and share on the people they help.

KUOW Graphic/Kara McDermott

In 2002, when the Bush administration started pushing cities to adopt 10-year plans to reduce homelessness, Seattle/King County was already on board.

The feds suggested targeting chronic homelessness – typically the most visibly homeless people. But Seattle was ambitious and promised to end all homelessness by 2015.  

It’s been 10 years since the Seattle plan was launched, and the number of homeless people here has surged. This isn’t a national trend – across the county, homelessness has dropped by nearly a quarter.

Rachel Martin owns and manages Ballard Blossom. She says she monitors the news, apps and public websites to determine the most efficient route for her delivery drivers.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Mayor Ed Murray laid out his 10-year transportation plan Monday. The move sets the stage for renewing the transportation levy that expires this year. He plans to reveal a new levy proposal in a few weeks.

Seattle's city hall was a mishmash of additions, including a basement where some prisoners were sent and brutally treated, fed a minimal diet of bread and water.
Seattle.gov

Little surprises Knute Berger, writer and local historian, when it comes to Seattle history.

So when he discovered that Seattle had used chain gangs – ball and chain style – into the 1900s, he thought, “Chain gangs? That’s a Southern thing.”

Bamboo, one of two elephants at Woodland Park Zoo, will be leaving with Chai.
Flickr Photo/Cara_VSAngel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Woodland Park Zoo’s two remaining elephants will be moving to Oklahoma City. Zoo officials made the announcement Friday after months of debate.

Reporter Dominic Holden at his going-away roast after departing The Stranger,  Nov. 1, 2014. Holden submitted a complaint to the SPD after an incident in July 2013.
Joe Mabel

In the summer of 2013, Seattle journalist Dominic Holden, a reporter for The Stranger, filed a complaint with Seattle’s Office of Professional Accountability, saying a police officer tried to harass and intimidate him. The OPA sustained his complaint, saying the officer had broken rules on professional courtesy and deserved a one-day suspension without pay. The case was closed.

Then in February last year, Holden heard indirectly that the officer had appealed the finding. Interim SPD Chief Harry Bailey had reached a settlement with the officer in which the misconduct finding was, in fact, reversed.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Changes are afoot at King County Metro. Bus fares went up over the weekend by 25 cents. Bus drivers started accepting the county's new reduced fare cards, called ORCA Lift. And Metro's gone on a hiring spree as it gears up to fulfill Seattle's custom order, approved by voters last fall, for 10 percent more bus service.

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