News

The Eastside Dabbles With Affordable Housing

Nov 24, 2014
Redmond barber Young Choi discusses the changing face of Redmond with client Kurt Link.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle has struggled to provide affordable housing, and now suburbs are grappling with the same problem. Cities on the Eastside have been updating zoning laws to encourage more affordable housing. But critics say those cities should press developers for more.

Hill’s Barber Shop has been serving people in Redmond for more than 40 years. Last year, Young Choi, an immigrant from South Korea, bought the business.

Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC BY-NC-ND)

The city is beginning to hammer out the details of the subsidized preschool program Seattle voters approved two weeks ago. At a news conference Wednesday, Mayor Ed Murray announced the first two members of an advisory group that will lay out recommendations for things like how the city should select care providers.

Erin Okuno is executive director of the Southeast Seattle Education Coalition, and Kevin Washington is chair of the board of directors of Thrive by Five. Murray said they will serve as co-chairs of the advisory group, with more members to be appointed soon.

A scene from "All the Way," a play about President Lyndon B. Johnson by Seattle playwright Robert Schenkkan.
Seattle Repertory Theatre

For those of us who came of age in the 1960s, Texas Democrat Lyndon Baines Johnson was larger than life. 

Johnson had years of Congressional politicking under his belt when he was thrust into the presidency after John F. Kennedy's assassination. He used that political experience to change America. The Johnson administration ushered in a new era for civil rights, as well as environmental protections, among other cultural paradigm shifts.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Rents are rising sharply in Seattle, and the city has launched another effort to tackle the shortage of affordable housing.

At an Ethiopian community center in the Rainier Valley, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's new affordable housing committee tried Wednesday night to take the pulse of a community hit hard by housing costs.

The 28-member committee's first open house began slowly as a consultant showed the multicultural audience how to use handheld electronic clickers to take part in an instant survey.

Kevin Stormans, owner of Ralph's Thriftway, is at the heart of a seven-year legal over whether pharmacists can withhold prescriptions for religious reasons. The debate began over whether pharmacists may refuse to dispense the contraception pill Plan B.
Google Maps Street View

Whether pharmacists must dispense controversial prescriptions goes before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday. The case pits patients’ access to medication against healthcare providers’ religious beliefs. 

In 2007, pharmacy owner Kevin Stormans and two pharmacists sued Washington state. The Washington Pharmacy Board had just adopted rules to insure that patients had access to prescriptions in a timely manner.

An Army sergeant who faced two counts of premeditated murder announced via Twitter he will plead guilty to a lesser charge at Joint Base Lewis-McChord Thursday.

Sergeant 1st class Michael Barbera says he will plead guilty to communicating a threat.

Roosevelt High School, Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

After 13 students at Roosevelt High School in Seattle came down with whooping cough, Seattle Public Schools looked at their records and saw they had all been immunized against the highly contagious, bacterial illness.

If they were vaccinated, how did they contract whooping cough, or pertussis?

Bamboo, one of two elephants at Woodland Park Zoo, will be leaving with Chai.
Flickr Photo/Cara_VSAngel (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle’s elephants are leaving town to join another herd.

The Woodland Park Zoo announced on Wednesday that it will close its elephant exhibit and send its only two elephants, Chai and Bamboo, to another zoo.

Across Seattle are storefronts with green crosses out front – medical marijuana providers.

Seattle has long been friendly to these businesses, but there’s mounting friction between them and state-licensed stores as lawmakers sort out the state’s new legal marijuana law.

This week, the City of Seattle will hold a symposium on the city’s booming medical marijuana scene. The event comes as city officials are trying to gently rein in these unregulated businesses.

Santo Rodriguez says when he can't do his laundry or take a shower for a few days, people treat him differently, like refusing to sit next to him on the bus.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The city budget for the next two years is coming together and it looks like a downtown facility for the homeless will get enough money to keep its doors open from early morning to late at night. 

It’s called the Urban Rest Stop and it’s a place where the people without a home can take showers, do their laundry and use the restroom (without having to buy a cup of coffee first). 

Flickr Photo/neovain (CC-By-NC-ND)

You might think the elderly are targeted by strangers, but more often, it’s someone they know.  

Now prosecutors say that crimes against vulnerable adults are on the rise.

Pujpha Bania, 33, and her daughter Manisha, 8, are migrant workers from Odisha state in northeast India. They travelled several days by train to work at a brick kiln near Hyderabad, India.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

HYDERABAD, INDIA – The road to Hyderabad winds through a landscape of ancient boulders – some three or four stories high. The earth-colored stones fill wide gaps between the sleek, high-rise towers that push the city’s skyline and suburbs to new limits.

Students sit in a computer science class taught by professor Chakravarthy Bhagavati at the University of Hyderabad.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

HYDERABAD, INDIA – If you ask engineering students in India about their career paths, the conversation often leads to America and if they’d like to go there.

“Obviously,” is a typical response.

Apurva Koti, 16, plays tabla drums in his living room in Hyderabad, India.  Apurva also plays electric guitar. Apurva and his family moved to India from Redmond, Washington in 2008.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

HYDERABAD, INDIA – Decades ago, when immigrants moved to Seattle from India, they asked each other: “Why would you ever leave the U.S.?”

But now, a growing number of Indians are doing just that. And they’re doing it largely so the families they start here can bond with their homeland.

Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC BY-NC-ND)

Posey Gruener interviews Metro bus drivers at Northgate Transit Center, who describe why they're having trouble catching a bathroom break.

And Marcie Sillman speaks with Paul Bachtel, president of the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 587, which represents transit operators. Bachtel said access to bathrooms is "probably the most significant issue [for the union right now]. It's much greater than wages, or benefits. It's a working issues condition and it's the number one cry of unfairness from our transit operators at this point in time."

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