News

File Photo of an old water fountain.
Flickr Photo/Paul Domenick (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dqusC4

Washington lawmakers want to step up efforts to keep lead out of school drinking water. But the state won't pay for school water quality tests until at least fall of 2017.


The mayor of Federal Way announced a special City Council meeting tonight Thursday. The city has seen a recent uptick in gun violence.

It's had three deaths from shootings this week.


Courtesy of Kate Murphy

You probably already know this, but lunch these days is sad. This is especially true when it’s eaten during the workday. Frequently, it’s eaten alone, at the desk while answering emails.

There’s research to back lunch’s retreat into sadness.

Tents lined up in the Jungle, which extends north and south under Seattle's Interstate 5 corridor.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Almost nobody provides outreach and services in the Jungle, the homeless encampment under Interstate 5. Most city-funded outreach workers won't go there because of safety concerns. 

But that's about to change. The city of Seattle is planning what they're calling an intense period of outreach in the Jungle. 

About three feet of snow covered the summit of Chinook Pass in 2015. That was an exceptionally light snow year for Washington.
WSDOT blog

The unusually warm spring has let gardeners do some early planting, but it signals problems ahead for Washington farmers. The warm weather is causing snow in the mountains to melt faster than normal.


File Photo of an old water fountain.
Flickr Photo/Paul Domenick (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dqusC4

SEATTLE - For about $5 per student in Washington state's public schools, every parent could know if the drinking water in their child's school was free of lead.

But instead of putting $5 million in the state's budget to pay for lead testing inside public schools, Washington's Legislature has left school districts to their own devices on this health and safety issue.

Progress at last on the tunnel being built to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct.
Flickr Photo/Washington State Department of Transportation CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The Alaskan Way Viaduct is back in operation after a closure that was supposed to last two weeks, but only lasted for a week and a bit.

It’s a surprise, and not the kind we are used to from Bertha, the tunnel borer that could, then couldn’t, and now apparently can. Bertha's bearings and seals were damaged early on, forcing the Seattle Tunnel Partners to haul it to the surface for a massive repair that completed just a few months ago.


Germaine J. Kornegay is the first black city council member for Sedro-Wolley, a small town north of Seattle. Although she supported Barack Obama in 2008, she now supports Hillary Clinton.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Germaine J. Kornegay is the only black city council member for Sedro-Woolley, a tiny timber town about an hour north of Seattle.


Beth Barrett cheerfully confesses that she almost flunked the only film studies class she took when she was a student at the University of Iowa.


The first Syrian refugees have arrived in Seattle since President Obama announced the U.S. would take at least 10,000 Syrian refugees next year.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Presidential candidate Donald Trump warned against Syrian refugees during his recent visit to Washington state. KUOW’s Race and Culture reporter Liz Jones takes a closer look at the candidate’s claims.


Oregon Spotted Frog
Flickr Photo/USFWS Pacific Region, Teal Waterstrat (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ajZhmE

On Monday federal officials defined the critical habitat for a rare Northwest creature: the Oregon spotted frog. That designation is required since the frog was listed as threatened in 2014.

You'd be lucky to see or hear this frog.


Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now!, addressing the Chicago Green Festival in 2010.
Chris Eaves/Wikimedia Commons CC by 2.0

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now! on activist power: 

Bernie Sanders did not start a movement; he tapped into a movement.

The Occupy movement, which never really ended, even though people thought that didn't amount to a hill of beans.

Oh, that's not true.

You say the 1 percent today. And the 99 percent. Everyone knows what you mean. They occupied the language. The word “occupy” was the most looked-up for use word of 2011.

(You change the language, you change the world.)

Rebecca Benson, a public health nurse in King County, holds up a box now being given to parents for their babies to sleep in. Benson, who shared a bed with her own babies, now believes that giving babies their own space to sleep is preferable.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

When infants die in King County, the medical examiner investigates.

One hundred babies were found to have died of SUID – sudden unexpected infant death – between 2009 and 2015, according to data obtained by KUOW.


Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference, has inspired a conversation about vulgarity in political speech.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

If you're a Republican, you may gotten your ballot and thought to yourself, "Why bother filling that out? I mean, Donald Trump is the last candidate standing. He's assured of getting the nomination, right?"


A coal mine operation in Wyoming.
EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

The Lummi Nation’s Tribal Chairman Timothy Ballew pulled fellow council member Travis Brockie into his office to announce the big news:

He’d just gotten off the phone with Col. John Buck of the Army Corps of Engineers.


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