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An armpit dye model. Roxie Hunt of Vain salon in downtown Seattle started dying friend's armpits in bright Kool-Aid colors. That little experiment garnered international attention.
Courtesy Roxie Hunt, How To Hair Girl

Roxie Hunt didn't set out to be a spokesperson for armpit hair and feminism.

But one day Hunt stopped shaving under her armpits, a decision that sparked conversations about body hair and fashion choices at Vain, the downtown salon where she works.

And then she got another idea: What if they dyed their armpit hair in electric Kool-Aid colors? Hunt, who runs the popular How To Hair Girl blog, dyed her friend’s armpits a bright teal blue to match her hair. And then she blogged about it in a post that got shared 30,000 times.

File photo of a hand gun.
Flickr Photo/Zorin Denu (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Opponents of the new measure that expands gun background checks in Washington have filed suit against it.

They're asking a federal judge to block parts of Initiative 594 that involve transfers of guns. That initiative was approved by voters in November.

File photo of a flu shot.
Flickr Photo/Fort Meade (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The flu season is ramping up and it has turned deadly in Washington state.

According to the State Health Department Wednesday, influenza has claimed at least seven lives in Washington so far this season. Two deaths last week and five this week were confirmed in lab tests.

Donn Moyer, a spokesman for the department, said despite the news that this season's flu vaccine is less effective against mutations of the current strain, people should still get the shot if they can.

Inside Everett's Boeing factory.
Flickr Photo/Jetstar Airways (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It was a year of soaring profits for Boeing and Microsoft, rapid expansion for Amazon and anguish for Boeing machinists. KUOW's economy reporter Carolyn Adolph tells Bill Radke how the Puget Sound region's major employers fared in 2014.

File photo of oil train tankers in a Portland, Ore. railyard.
EarthFix Photo/Tony Schick

SEATTLE — For the past few years, a growing number of trains have been bringing “rolling pipelines” of oil from North Dakota to ports and refineries in the Pacific Northwest.

And in that time, the Washington and Oregon legislatures have failed to come up with the money to pay for the cost of responding to the increasing risk of oil spills in their states. That could change in 2015.

Justin Ingram ate two heaping bowls of cereal, a bowl of oatmeal, two pieces of toast with butter and a rare pint of ice cream for breakfast at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Ballard on Tuesday morning. Still, he says he's lost 50 pounds while homeless
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

A facility in Ballard where homeless men and women can wash their clothes and take a shower has received the city's blessing, but the process has been stalled by a legal complaint filed by concerned neighbors.

Final permits for the Urban Rest Stop can't be issued until it's resolved. The delay is felt hardest by those struggling to enter the job market and be a part of society. 

A frequent sight in our newsroom: Business reporter Carolyn Adolph arguing with Siri, the iPhone personal assistant.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Dear KUOW listeners,

We apologize for the inconvenience several of you experienced recently when listening to a story about distracted driving and Siri, the personal assistant who lives inside the iPhone.

An oil tanker and a container ship about to cross paths near Seattle.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Oil tankers bring about 15 million gallons of oil every day into Washington state. Starting Jan. 1, those ships are required to have double hulls.

The oil-spill prevention measure has been in the works for decades, ever since Capt. Joseph Hazelwood ran the Exxon Valdez onto Alaska's Bligh Reef in 1989. Eleven million gallons of oil spilled into Prince William Sound, killing thousands of seabirds and sea otters, devastating the region's fisheries and unleashing action in Washington, D.C.

When my friend tells me she’s thinking about having a baby on her own, my mind flashes immediately to that January morning in 2011 when, as I just settled my eighth graders into a rare calm, my son’s father burst into my classroom with a video camera, sloppy drunk, slurring demands about my son’s whereabouts.

2014: The Year Of All Women

Dec 29, 2014
Katie Kuffel, right, debated whether to tell her story at a rally on Friday opposing violence against women. The rally stemmed from the May 23 shootings in Santa Barbara the week before. Kuffel's partner, Gerri DeSouza, joined her in a six-second scream.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Women didn’t plan for 2014 to be a year of activism. But a series of events sparked a discussion of sexual assault on campus, rape and incessant harassment of young women in public.

On social media, a movement materialized under the hashtags #yesallwomen and #carrythatweight.

"Carry that weight" referred Emma Sulkowicz, the Columbia University student who carries a mattress around campus, demanding that her alleged rapist be kicked out of school. (The university has dismissed the case made by Sulkowicz and two other women.)

A Washington State ferry travels to Friday Harbor.
Flickr Photo/James N (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Travelers to the San Juan Islands have always had to cope with uncertainty. Up to now there’s been no way to guarantee a spot on a particular ferry.

But Washington ferries are now taking reservations for the San Juan Islands. The first ferries to fill up under the new system leave Monday morning.

Foster High School senior Nandina Cengic is a feminist, filmmaker and activist.
Courtesy of Jesenko Spahic

Do you hate men?

Nandina Cengic said she hears that question all the time. That's because the Foster High School senior tells people she is a feminist. As she puts it, people assume she's a "man hater," who's "trying to squander men."

"Which isn't true at all!" she said. 

KUOW/John Ryan photo

Eddy Mahon says the Aloha Inn saved his life.

Each day, thousands of people speed by the run-down old motel on Highway 99 just south of Seattle's Aurora Bridge. It's no longer a motel. Now it's a place where homeless people can stay for up to two years and get help while they try to get back on their feet; there's a long waiting list to get in. Mahon manages the Aloha.

He told his story to KUOW's John Ryan.

Mural near the Fisherman's Cove Marina and Lummi Island Ferry on Lummi Nation.
KUOW Photo/Jeff Emtman

After a visit to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Nation in North Dakota, President Barack Obama announced an initiative to help Native American youth.

Obama's proposal aims to provide culturally appropriate education at tribal schools, access to mental health providers and peer counseling and better preparation for college and careers. KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel spoke with Gyasi Ross, a writer, attorney and member of the Blackfeet tribe. He lives on the Suquamish reservation north of Seattle.

“You can see it in Obama's face, you can hear it in the words that he speaks -- he actually has a passion for trying to do something proactively for Native people," Ross said. "I knew that it was coming from a good place.”

KUOW Photo/Jenny Asarnow

When RadioActive's Noah Phillips Reardon was 13, her friend put Beat Connection's song "Silver Screen" on a mix tape. Noah played it over and over and over again. Four years later, she sat down with the Seattle band in KUOW's studio for this live performance and interview. 

Keyboard player and producer Reed Juenger explains the phrase he coined to describe today's iteration of the perennial artist's dilemma: Industrial Condo Sadness.

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