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Flickr Photo/Skip&Nell (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Washington State Patrol Trooper Chase VanCleave about the new distracted driving law. Trooper VanCleave gets into the difference between primary offenses and secondary offense in the law.

Delvonn Heckard's legal team: Julie Kays, left, and Lincoln Beauregard.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Earlier this year, a man named Delvonn Heckard filed a lawsuit claiming he was repeatedly raped by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the mid-1980s, when he was a teenager.

Heckard later withdrew the suit.

Beach-goers in Seattle enjoy a Puget Sound shore in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

While the Trump administration aims to slash funding for environmental protection nationwide and eliminate funding for cleaning up Puget Sound, the Republican-controlled Congress hasn’t seen things the same way.

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

One thing all of the candidates running for Seattle City Council Position 8 agree on: The rent is too damn high. But they're divided on what to do about it. 

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

State and local governments in Washington receive millions in federal police grants. This week, the Justice Department said some of these future grants are contingent on immigration enforcement. It’s the administration’s latest swing at so-called sanctuary cities.

Illustration by Drew Christie

Bill Radke speaks with Katherine Switz, founder and executive director of The Stability Network. The nonprofit includes professionals who give talks and workplace presentations about their own mental health diagnoses and the stigma surrounding taking a day off work for mental health. 

Courtesy of Shannon Hargis

Picture a Metro bus of new people entering Seattle every day. That’s roughly how much the city is growing.*

One of those newbies is Shannon Hargis.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle is growing crazy fast — roughly 56 people moved here every day last year. 

We've heard what some Seattelites think of newcomers (ahem). But what do newcomers think about Seattle? Especially during an election season when we're our least "Seattle nice."

File: Magnuson Park movie night, 2015.
Google Maps

If you were hoping to make it to movie night at Magnuson Park in the next few weeks, you're out of luck.

The outdoor movie series has been canceled part way through the season.

Safe injection sites in King County would be stocked with naloxone, a drug used to treat narcotic overdoses in an emergency
Flickr Photo/Jeff Anderson (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/QDVuAb

Bellevue could become one of the first places in King County to impose a ban on supervised injection sites for drug users.

Registered nurse Sammy Mullally holds a tray of supplies to be used by a drug addict at the Insite safe injection clinic in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday May 11, 2011.
AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Darryl Dyck

Plans to open safe consumption sites for drug users in King County may soon be subject to a public vote. 

Opponents say they've collected nearly 70,000 signatures, more than enough to get an initiative banning such sites on the ballot.

In this March 12, 2015, file photo, Seattle police officer Debra Pelich, right, wears a video camera on her eyeglasses as she talks with Alex Legesse before a small community gathering in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File

Seattle's police union leaders have filed a complaint against Mayor Ed Murray's body camera mandate. Murray issued an executive order this month to require all officers to wear body cameras while on duty.

KUOW/John Ryan

Eleven states including Washington have sued the Trump administration to improve safety at the nation’s refineries and chemical plants.

The lawsuit, led by New York's Attorney General, aims to force the Environmental Protection Agency to revive safety rules enacted in the final days of the Obama administration.

A detainee sits in the intake area at the Tacoma Detention Center in 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

When the Department of Justice ordered a group of Seattle lawyers to stop helping in some immigration cases, the lawyers fought back.

On Monday, U.S. District Judge Richard Jones sided with the lawyers again in a nationwide ruling.

A mural on 20th Avenue in Seattle's Central District
KUOW Photo/Paul Kiefer

A plan to bring more affordable housing to Seattle's Central District was approved by the City Council today. 

It's one part of the city's goal to add 20,000 new units for lower-income households (those making less than 60 percent of the area’s median income).

Football
Flickr Photo/Eierschneider (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Ok5MYl

Bill Radke speaks with Seatle Times staff reporter Claudia Rowe about her investigation into how football and basketball teams at Seattle Public Schools use a law to protect homeless students as a way to get around eligibility requirements for student athletes.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The Trump Administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants is causing some people to avoid seeking medical care.  Public Health Seattle-King County is taking steps to reassure patients.


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray rejects a call for him to resign after a Seattle Times report that an Oregon child-welfare investigator concluded Murray had sexually abused his foster son in the 1980s.

Washington's new distracted driving law starts this weekend. You already couldn't hold your phone up to your ear. Now anything more than the "minimal use of a finger" will cost you a $136 fine.

And bike share is back in Seattle, with a new idea: leave the bike where ever you want to when you're done riding it. Will it work?

KUOW PHOTO / KATE WALTERS

The first lawsuit over Seattle's new income tax on high earners has been filed. The city is being sued by Michael Kunath in King County Superior Court.

He and his attorney didn't immediately respond to interview requests, but according to court filings, Kunath argues that Seattle's new income tax on high earners violates the state constitution. That's because the constitution says cities cannot impose a net income tax.

Seattle's mayoral candidates explain themselves

Jul 21, 2017
Top candidates for Seattle mayor debate in a forum hosted by KING 5 and KUOW.
KING 5

What separates top candidates for Seattle mayor? How would they tackle housing costs, police reform and other problems facing a booming city? KUOW interviewed them on the top issues and here are the results.

Dozens of murals hang on the walls at the Northwest Detention Center. They're painted by detainees, and the designs must be approved by staff. Painting is also considered a voluntary job, and the artists are paid $1 per day for their work.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The policy changes came fast as President Donald Trump took office.

In Seattle, a city where roughly one in five people are immigrants, protests erupted. First, when Trump ordered a crackdown on so-called sanctuary cities for undocumented immigrants.

The King County Council decided to put a proposed property tax increase before voters this November. The levy renews funding for veterans and now also, seniors.

Thursday the King County Board of Health approved a new regulation for pregnancy resource centers, otherwise known as limited service pregnancy centers.

Under the rule, they need to post signage saying "This facility is not a health care facility."

Tommy Le's family sit front and center at Asian Counseling and Referral Services (ACRS) in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Angela Nhi Nguyen

A community forum was held Wednesday night in Seattle, to give people a chance to talk about the fatal officer-involved shooting of 20-year-old Tommy Le. Parents of the young man spoke about his death.

Seattle police officer James Norton is running for mayor
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Monday, July 24, is the deadline for people to register in person to vote in the August primary.

Twenty one candidates for Seattle mayor are vying for votes. There are multiple long-shots in the race, including Seattle police officer James Norton.

Mathematical physicist and educator Robbert Dijkgraaf on the importance of the 'pursuit of useless knowledge' in both the sciences and the humanities.
Courtesy of Andrea Kane/Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ USA

In 1939 the influential American education reformer Abraham Flexner published an essay in Harper’s Magazine titled “The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge.” In it he promoted the well-funded, free pursuit of scientific inquiry, arguing that great scientists were “driven not by the desire to be useful but merely the desire to satisfy their curiosity.”

A look inside More Hall Annex at the old nuclear reactor
Courtesy of Washington Trust for Historic Preservation/Jennifer Mortensen

The Washington State Supreme Court has put an end to a decades-old debate between the University of Washington and the city of Seattle.

The court ruled Thursday that the UW has to abide by the city's landmark preservation laws.

Seattle Police Officer Louis Chan, center, talks with a man in Ballard about his erratic and threatening behavior. Chan is partnered with a social worker to help deescalate volatile situations.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

When it comes to policing, there’s a lot of history in the race for Seattle mayor.

Two of the candidates, Jenny Durkan and Mike McGinn, have faced off before. They negotiated the city’s consent decree between the Justice Department and the city of Seattle.

The crowd at a 2016 public meeting in Tacoma rises when asked to stand if they oppose the proposed methanol plant.
KUOW Photo/Ashley Ahearn

Environmental issues haven't been a big focus in the race to become Seattle's next mayor, but they're playing a key role in Tacoma.

Police and city staff arrived in the morning of Friday, March 11, 2016 to force out the remaining 16 residents atat the former Nickelsville camp on South Dearborn Street.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Whoever is elected as the next mayor of Seattle will inherit a growing homelessness crisis.

Perhaps the most visible markers of this crisis are the tents that line the freeways and nestle in the city’s green spaces.

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