Seattle's Pier 86 grain terminals may be adorned with art some day. Grain silos elsewhere in the world have been a canvas for public art.
Flickr Photo/Bernt Rostad

  You see it everywhere in Seattle.

Hammering Man.

The dance steps on Broadway.

The Fremont Troll.

The super blood moon over Seattle on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015.
Flickr Photo/David Lee (CC BY SA 2.0)/

The Northwest was was treated with a spectacular sky show Sunday night as a lunar eclipse coincided with a supermoon -- a full moon when it's at its closest to Earth on its orbit. Clear autumn skies allowed for prime viewing.

The phenomenon hasn't happened in 33 years, and we'll have to wait another 18 to see it again in 2033 (we however do not yet have a forecast on what the weather will be like that day).

Shell's Polar Pioneer was greeted by dozens of protesting kayakers when it arrived in Seattle this spring.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Environmentalist are celebrating Shell’s decision to stop oil exploration off Alaska’s northern coast indefinitely, but the immediate future of the company’s base at the Port of Seattle is unclear.

Mai Nguyen from Vietnam leads the Shoreline Community College Ukulele Club in a song.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle-area community college students are planning a vigil this week to remember the five international students who lost their lives on the Aurora Bridge. That’s just one example of how students here help each other. Foreign students are thousands of miles away from their families, but they’re not alone.

Share Your Family Connection To World War II

Sep 27, 2015

In a recent story, KUOW Ashley Ahearn reports on the making of the B-17 bomber in Seattle – and the women who moved here to work on Boeing’s production lines.

We want to hear from you. How was your family affected by World War II? Share your memories and photos with us. Write to If you send photos, please be sure to describe what's pictured.

Submissions may be published at and our social media accounts.

Daniel Bagley Elementary School in north Seattle.
Joe Wolf/Flickr Photo (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Bill Radke talks with Seattle school board member Harium Martin-Morris about a new policy to stop suspending elementary students for nonviolent misbehavior.

Jazmyn Scott stands in front of a mural created for MOHAI by SPECSWIZARD who has been making art and beats in Seattle since 1978.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

This week MOHAI opened a new show called The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop. The exhibit is not just about the history here, it’s also about how Seattle hip-hop fits into the larger culture.

For Daudi Abe, author of the upcoming book “Emerald Street: A History of Hip-Hop in Seattle 1979-2015,” it all began 36 years ago.

A woman is taken to an ambulance on the Aurora Bridge after the crash Thursday.
KUOW photo/Liz Jones

They came to Seattle from around the world: Austria, China, Indonesia and Japan. 

They died on the Aurora Bridge on Thursday.

They were mourned at North Seattle College on Friday, where some students said they were frightened by the collision between a large tourist vehicle known as “the Duck” and a bus.

The tall ship Monogahela passes under the uncompleted Aurora Bridge circa 1931.
Library of Congress

When Mike Warren of Queen Anne turned on his TV Thursday, his gut tightened.

Four people had died in a collision on the Aurora Bridge beneath his house. Another 50 or so had been injured. They were international students enrolled at North Seattle College.

“I was going back through the craziness from when Jonathan died,” Warren said.

An injured person is taken from the scene of the Aurora Bridge bus crash on Thursday.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Is the Aurora Bridge too narrow for six fast-moving lanes? Tim Eyman is in trouble again, and unrepentantly so. What did China’s president bring to Seattle besides traffic? Will Seattle’s tallest landmark be eclipsed by a long shot? And what if the Seahawks never win again?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with Knute Berger, Joni Balter and Bill Finkbeiner, plus KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph, Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins, Puget Sound Business Journal’s Emily Parkhurst  and Mike Pesca of Slate’s The Gist podcast.

Howard Lake, north of Stehekin in Washington's North Cascades.
Courtesy of Mike Annee

Fifty Washington lawmakers have made an impassioned plea to change the name of a North Cascades lake on federal maps to remove the possibility that it represents a racial slur.

North Seattle College international students Max Putera and Jeffrey Tung.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Monday will be the first day of school for North Seattle College. The students in the international program will have a lot more than school on their minds. They’ll be thinking about the four students who died in a bus crash on the Aurora bridge Thursday.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch says Seattle is one of the cities that have turned the corner on policing.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch says she came to Seattle as part of a tour of cities “that have turned the corner” toward better policing.

She appeared alongside Mayor Ed Murray and Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole, who all said Seattle has become a model for other cities.

File photo of kids playing tag.
Flickr Photo/Felipe Vidal (CC BY SA 2.0)/

Traditional tag is back in the Mercer Island School District.

The district had decided to ban the perennial favorite game from its playgrounds as part of a "hands-off" policy among children meant to reduce injuries and bullying.

Mona Eltahawy speaking at the Personal Democracy Forum in 2011.
Flickr Photo/personaldemocracy (CC BY SA 2.0)/

Author and journalist Mona Eltahawy learned harrowing lessons about the role of women in revolution during the Arab Spring uprisings. She was physically and sexually assaulted by Egyptian riot police.

Eltahawy says she became “a proud, angry woman” because injustice demanded that of her. She calls herself an anarchist of the Emma Goldman School. She believes that shock and provocation are necessary to bring about change.