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Bill Radke, host of the Record, reads an apology on air on Friday, Sept. 22.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

This week, we chose to air an interview I did with a man who got punched unconscious in downtown Seattle, while wearing a swastika armband.

He said he's not a Nazi. Many of you told me if you wear a swastika, you’re a Nazi. We’ll discuss that in a moment.

The Luminata lantern parade begins with a performance on Thursday, September 21, 2017, at Green Lake in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Lanterns of all colors, shapes and sizes illuminated Green Lake on Thursday for the Luminata lantern parade. The parade, hosted by the Fremont Arts Council, signifies the autumn equinox and the beginning of fall. 

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle has a shortage of housing. But all over town, houses stand vacant. Either they’re in foreclosure, or they’re waiting to be torn down for development. Some people think vacant homes are an underused resource.

One man steals them.


A pro-Trump rally attendee listens to an organizer speak at Westlake Plaza in downtown Seattle on Monday, May 1, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

On Wednesday we aired an interview with a man who wore a Nazi armband in Seattle. According to people observing him on the bus and then downtown, this man harassed black people — by yelling and throwing bananas at them. 


An Alaskan Copper Works employee walks in the  warehouse on Friday, September 8, 2017, in front of a mural painted by artists Blaine Fontana, Sneke, Hews and APaul, along the Sodo Track, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The second summer of painting is complete for the Sodo Track mural project, with 26 artists painting on 14 properties.

The project, when complete after next summer, will consist of over 50 artists from all over the world, with painted murals relating to one common theme – motion.

Your feedback on The Record's interview with a neo-Nazi

Sep 21, 2017

Brendan Sweeney is KUOW's managing producer. He oversees The Record.

On yesterday’s episode of The Record, Bill Radke spoke with a Seattleite who wore a Nazi band in public. The conversation aired at 12:57 p.m.

The response from our audience was swift and largely negative. Broadly speaking, that feedback via phone calls, emails, tweets and Facebook posts fell into two categories:

Dr. Jonathan Kanter, associate psychology professor at the University of Washington
KUOW/Megan Farmer

Racism takes many forms — it could be a white supremacist rally or a racial slur — but more subtle forms, called microaggressions, happen every day.

Dr. Jonathan Kanter wanted to learn more about microaggressions from a white person's point of view. The associate psychology professor and his research team at the University of Washington found that people who are more likely to make subtle racist statements are also more racist in other ways.

He told KUOW's Emily Fox that the researchers began by asking black students what they thought were microaggressive behavior.


Courtesy of Nation Books

Who are the most dangerous people in America? According to author John Nichols, the answer to that question includes the following: Betsy DeVos, Scott Pruitt, Stephen Miller, Steve Bannon, Jeff Sessions, Elaine Chao, Kris Kobach and Rex Tillerson.

The list goes on to include over 40 members of President Donald Trump’s inner circle.

Attack ad targetting Democrat and Washington State Senate candidate Manka Dingra
YouTube Screenshot

The political attack ad starts with the image of a dirty heroin needle. 

"Heroin destroys lives and threatens our community," the narrator says. “Now Seattle politicians wants safe injection sites around King County.” 


Thick brows were not invented by your favorite Instagram star

Sep 21, 2017
KUOW PHOTO/ZEYTUN AHMED

What’s up with eyebrows?

Eyebrows take up such a small part of our bodies but hold a special place in our hearts. They also make up a multimillion dollar industry.

Growth makes driving Seattle streets crazy - in front of schools, on narrow streets in old neighborhoods, and 59th St. and 22nd Ave NW  where this crazy thing went down. Our audience's question, by a landslide: where are the stop signs to restore order?
KUOW/Megan Farmer

As traffic has worsened in the Seattle area, drivers have taken to side streets to beat the brake lights.

This prompted one of our most popular Local Wonder questions: Why doesn’t Seattle have more stop signs?


Dozens of murals hang on the walls at the Northwest Detention Center. They're painted by detainees, and the designs must be approved by staff. Painting is also considered a voluntary job, and the artists are paid $1 per day for their work.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson is suing the company that runs the immigration detention center in Tacoma.

The lawsuit claims that GEO Group, Inc., the second-largest private prison operator in the nation, has been violating the state's minimum wage law for over a decade.

The federal government is just beginning to enforce the Obama-era education rule called Every Student Succeeds Act. The measure replaces the No Child Left Behind Act.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The rising cost of housing in America's most desirable "creative" cities troubles Richard Florida, urbanist thinker and author. In those cities, the cost of housing is affordable only to the creative class themselves. The rest of the working population — those in service industry or manufacturing — struggle to keep up with rising housing prices.

Florida says what's happening in Seattle, specifically, is surprising even to someone like him, "supposedly in the know."

A new report says Seattle police may have been underreporting hate crimes. 

This after Police Department’s own findings showed a substantial increase in hate crime reporting last year.

The Sam Hill mansion on Capitol Hill is on the market for $15 million.
KUOW Photos/Megan Farmer

The Sam Hill mansion on Capitol Hill is the most expensive real estate listing in Seattle.

Should the owner have to pay a luxury sales tax? It's one of the big proposals in this year's Seattle mayor's race.

Sharon Larcey and her boyfriend live in their vehicle. Sharon said many of her friends would benefit from a supervised drug site.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

At a King County council meeting earlier this month, Councilmember Jeanne Kohl-Welles sought to allay fears about supervised drug consumption sites being imposed on unwilling neighborhoods.


In addition to helmets. proper signaling and the use of front and rear lights are required for bikers in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/iurikothe

It's illegal to ride a bike without wearing a helmet in Seattle and greater King County.

Since three bike sharing companies launched in the city, however, there's been a lot of talk about how that law is enforced.

The non-binary option on Oregon's driver license application.
Oregon Department of Transportation

Washington state residents could eventually get a third option to designate gender on their birth certificates.

That new option would be "non-binary."

Turns out Siri might be racist

Sep 19, 2017
Siri on an iPhone.
Flickr Photo/Karlis Dambrans (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/njdYn7

We use speech recognition every day, like providing captions on video for the hard of hearing and voice-to-text apps on our smart phones. But when it comes to how well the software understands various accents or dialects, Caucasian speakers are understood much better than people of color. 

Justin Robinson, left, and the man who bought his apartment building, Dan Robins.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

When an old apartment building goes on the market, all of a sudden, everybody starts doing the math.  


One of the halls at juvenile detention in Seattle. There are 212 beds but less than a quarter of those beds are used.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The excavation work for King County’s new youth jail is done. But with the building’s foundation soon to be laid on East Alder Street, a new report calls into question how the design aligns with the county and city’s stated goals of not jailing young people at all.

Good guys, bad guys

Sep 19, 2017
Marines marching in Danang. March 15, 1965.
Courtesy of Associated Press

Ken Burns and Lynn Novick join Thanh Tan, host of our new podcast Second Wave, to discuss the new documentary, "The Vietnam War."


Councilmember Tim Burgess, right, takes the oath of office, administered by Seattle City Clerk Monica Simmons, on Monday, September 18, 2017, becoming the mayor of Seattle, at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle has another new mayor, the third in less than a week.

Noelani Pantastico and Lucien Postlewaite in 'Romeo et Juliette' in 2008 at Pacific Northwest Ballet.
Courtesy Pacific Northwest Ballet/Angela Sterling

Lucien Postlewaite remembers exactly how he felt the first time he danced with Noelani Pantastico.

“I was this young boy,” he recalls. “I’d always admired Noe’s dancing. The first time she talked to me I was like, ‘Oh my god!’”

Kevin, Kelvin and Georgia Hinton at their old apartment
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The movers have arrived at the Hinton household. They load up boxes onto dollies and wheel them out the door.

Ask a cop, get beyond 'protect and serve'

Sep 16, 2017
KUOW's Ask A Cop event at the Tukwila Community Center
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

“To protect and serve.” That’s the motto of many police agencies. But recent police shootings in Seattle and around the nation have undermined respect for the job cops do.

King County sheriff's deputies
Flickr Photo/N i c o l a (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8JhWF9

King County officials are calling on the sheriff's office to improve its de-escalation protocols. This week, the King County Council passed a measure requesting that the sheriff's office make updates to both policies and training when it comes to use of force.

Seattle City Council President Bruce Harrell signs an executive order on Wednesday, September 13, 2017, after taking the oath of office and becoming the mayor of Seattle at City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bruce Harrell, president of the Seattle City Council, has been mayor for two days. 

Former Mayor Ed Murray at a press conference in the University District in September 2016.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Let’s be clear. The mess that culminated in the resignation of Seattle’s ex-Mayor Ed Murray should not be celebrated as vindication that “the process works.”

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