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Street view of Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School, where gunfire damaged a school bus on Thursday afternoon.
Google Maps

Shots suspected of coming from a BB gun hit a school bus outside Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School in South Seattle on Thursday afternoon, according to Seattle police.

No students were on the bus at the time, and the driver was not injured, Seattle Public Schools said.

A portion of a page on SBTickets.com, provided by the state Attorney General's Office, offers reassurances to potential ticket buyers for the Super Bowl
Washington Attorney General's Office

Yes, the Seahawks 2015 Super Bowl loss was heartbreaking for fans. We'll leave that in the past. But here's something new: The state is filing a lawsuit against one Super Bowl ticket vendor. KUOW's Sara Lerner reports.

Amazon Vice President Greg Russell wants to help the Seattle Police Department make better use of technology.
Amy Radil

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole has announced a long-awaited leadership shakeup, looking outside and within the department for four new assistant chiefs.

photo @ Angela Sterling

I’ll admit it: I am a fan girl.

Last week, I got to sit down with one of my choreographic heroes, William Forsythe.

I came away from that conversation with renewed admiration for both Forsythe’s dances, and his respect and love for dancers – and theirs for him.

Fishing boats on Puget Sound
Flickr Photo/Canopic (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Sixty years ago, in the middle of the night, a Navy ship struck a small fishing boat in Puget Sound. The Santa Maria was from Tacoma, and three fishermen on board died. The deaths of three working men made front-page news, and their widows sued the Navy, but it looked like they would get nowhere, until a sound saved the day for them.

Workers and labor activists demonstrate outside the US District Courthouse in support of the city's $15 an hour minimum wage
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Lawyers for the International Franchise Association and five local franchisees were in court Tuesday asking that portions of Seattle’s new $15-an-hour minimum wage law be barred from taking effect.

An orca pod travels past the Seattle skyline. A new study shows that pods are most likely led by older females.
Courtesy of NOAA/Candice Emmons

Nearly every mammal on earth reproduces until they die – except for humans, and two species of whales.

A new study shows that older, female killer whales are most likely to lead their pods as they travel through the salmon foraging grounds of the Pacific Northwest.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about the personnel shakeup at the Seattle Police Department. Police Chief Kathleen O' Toole is replacing four assistant police chiefs.

Flickr Photo/Debbie R

Ross Reynolds talks with Kristi Heim, executive director of Washington State's China Relations Council, about local exports to China and the growing demand for fresh fruit and baby products. 

In this Sept. 10, 2014 file photo, detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center in Texas. About 70 children from the border have been placed with foster families in Washington state.
AP Photo/Eric Gay

Sara, 20, is a Mexican student in Des Moines, Washington, a half hour south of Seattle. She wears her hair in two braids, tucked under her black knit hat. White ear buds hang from her collar. She’s friendly, but far from talkative.

We meet in a small meeting room at Highline Community College, where she is taking a GED-prep class. She looks out the window as she recalls her first days in the U.S., at an immigration holding shelter in California. 

A screen capture shows the South Sound Magazine website after a hacking attack by a group claiming to be ISIS.
South Sound Magazine

South Sound Magazine is among several businesses across the country whose websites were hacked over the weekend by a group claiming to be the Islamic State, also known as ISIS.

NBC News reported that investigators were skeptical that ISIS was behind the attack, believing the hackers just claimed the affiliation to gain more attention.

On Saturday, the Tacoma-based magazine's normal website was replaced with an all-black background and a message beginning, "HACKED BY ISLAMIC STATE."

Rainier Avenue street Seattle
Flickr Photo/Matthew Rutledge (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Phyllis Porter, outreach coordinator and events specialist at Rainier Valley Greenways Project, about the Seattle Department of Transportation's plan to improve traffic safety on Rainier Avenue.

Josh Etzler, left, and colleague Jeff Stewart break for lunch in Tulalip. Etzler says marijuana retail stores could be undercut by tribes.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In Les Parks’ perfect world, the Tulalip Tribes would not only legalize marijuana but fund research into its medical benefits.  

“I see Tulalip leading the country and being on this frontier for what this plant can do for mankind, basically,” said Parks, the Tulalips’ vice chairman and a longtime supporter of legalization, speaking from the tribe’s gleaming new government building, with sweeping views over Puget Sound.

Keep grizzly bears in Alaska, residents of Central Washington residents have told federal agencies. Agencies are considering reintroducing the bears to the area.
EarthFix Photo

Bill Bruton, who lives in the foothills of the North Cascades, isn’t too keen on having grizzly bears as his neighbors.

That’s a proposition that has drawn dozens of his neighbors to meetings hosted by federal agencies in central Washington – Okanogon, Winthrop and Wenatchee. Those agencies want to reintroduce the animals to this part of the state, where ranches and homesteads butt up against public forestland.

A federal judge in Seattle heard arguments Friday in a potentially far-reaching immigration case. At issue is whether children who face deportation alone are entitled to an attorney, at the government’s expense. KUOW’s Liz Jones reports.

TRANSCRIPT:

There’s a rising trend of children coming alone to the U.S., unlawfully crossing the southern border. Most are from Mexico and Central America. They’re often called  ‘unaccompanied minors’.

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