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Flickr Photo/Emory Maiden (CC-BY-NC-2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/avtfVU

Kim Malcolm talks with Northshore School District Superintendent Dr. Michelle Reid about her district's new approach to assessing students for giftedness. In January, the district implemented a universal screening process for its Highly Capable program.

The yes light is on.
Flickr Photo/Jeremy Brooks (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/prQbnr

University of Washington sociologist Pepper Schwartz says the takeaway from the allegations against Aziz Ansari is that we should talk about sex before having it. She sat down with Bill Radke to discuss why that is and some of the social programming that gets in the way.

In "The Burning Question," KUOW takes a close look at Seattle’s goal of carbon neutrality and what it would take to get there. It turns out a lot of those solutions are right around us.

So, what would it be like to wake up in a Seattle that’s really on track to be carbon neutral? Here are seven snapshots of what success might look like. 

Dancer and choreographer Bill T. Jones at UW's Kane Hall, January 30, 2018.
Courtesy of Emile Pitre

"Art is going to save us, right?" Choreographer Bill T. Jones opens his talk. He says it’s not a laugh line. His answer is sobering.

In the iconoclastic world of modern dance, Bill T. Jones has long searched for answers to questions like, “What is love? What is death? And what does art have to do with it?” He explores those themes in this talk “Analogy/Form: Finding Meaning in Confusing Times.”

kids drawings
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Compost-pooping robot dog! Smog-cleaning penguins! Treehouses! Wikes (wind + bikes)!!! 

Those are just a few of the fantastic and whimsical ideas submitted to our drawing contest that asked kids to imagine one way Seattle can save energy.

Musa Sesay completes paperwork while waiting to meet with an immigration expert at McCaw Hall in Seattle on January 23, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Immigrants and refugees can get some free legal services this Saturday at the Seattle Center. For the second year, the city is hosting what it calls a “mega workshop” that aims to help more than a thousand people with citizenship applications and other immigration issues.

LaDonna Horne, center, is surrounded by family and friends during a vigil honoring her son, DaShawn Horne, on Saturday, Feb. 3, 2018, at Harborview Park in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Family members and friends are standing watch over a 26-year-old man who King County prosecutors say was the victim of an unprovoked racist attack last month.

DaShawn Horne remains in a medically induced coma at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

FILE - In this July 15, 2015 file photo, an Uber driver sits in his car near the San Francisco International Airport.
AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

Traffic congestion in Seattle is getting worse.

As traffic slows, more people are hailing rides from Uber and Lyft — and that’s adding to the trouble. Now, transit agencies that once fought to regulate car sharing services are thinking it may be time to make a new deal with them.

Pedestrians cross the street at Amazon headquarters in Seattle in September.
KUOW Photo / Megan Farmer

Carbon emissions by the tech giants that dominate cloud computing are surging, even as companies like Amazon and Microsoft take steps to tame their climate impact.

The Seattle-area competitors — two of the nation’s largest electricity consumers — take different approaches to their clouds' carbon problems. One favors sunshine; the other, secrecy. Internal documents obtained by KUOW break through that secrecy.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

State investigators say a farm near Bellingham is not to blame for the death a worker last summer. But the owners face steep fines for other violations.

Read these lyrics about regret from incarcerated youth

Feb 1, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/Lila Kitaeff

Two young men created this song at the Echo Glen Children's Center, a maximum security facility in Snoqualmie, in a series of workshops with RadioActive Youth Media. This was RadioActive's first workshop at Echo Glen.


Courtesy of Jamie Rand Imaging/Jamie Colman

The second annual Women’s March was celebrated in Seattle on January 20. Organizers say as many as 100,000 people attended. But those organizers had more in mind than a one-day march. They want to make a change.

Amazon employee Filomeno Saya packages items at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Amazon is now contacting its shortlist of places for its next headquarters. The company told applicants who didn’t make the cut that they’ll be considered for future investments by the company.

But a new study from the Economic Policy Institute says places that have already received Amazon investments in warehouses don’t get the growth they bargained for.

Customers shop at Amazon Go on Monday, January 22, 2018, on 7th Ave., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Amazon is the place where you buy stuff and then it magically appears at your front door. Or, more recently, it's the place where you go to buy a sandwich in a store and walk out without having to interact with a cashier.

There's an invisible side of all this: the cloud.


Dexter the peacock did not get to fly the friendly skies.
Photo courtesy Dexter the Peacock via Instagram screenshot/www.instagram.com/dexterthepeacock/

This week a woman and her peacock were turned away from a cross-country flight. She'd pleaded that Dexter was an emotional support animal, to no avail. And now the most regal road movie in existence is taking place as the pair drives to Los Angeles instead. But sneaking untrained animals onto planes and into restaurants is no snickering matter, and could soon be subject to civil penalties in Washington state.

School bus drivers with Teamsters Local 174 strike on Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018, outside of the First Student bus lot on Lake City Way Northeast in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle public school bus drivers began a strike Thursday morning, and it's unclear how long the picketing will last. 

Seattle folk singer and restaurateur Ivar Haglund
Courtesy of Ivar’s

Kim Malcolm gets advice from KUOW reporter David Hyde on what seafood to order to lower your carbon footprint as a part of our series "The Burning Question: What would a climate friendly Seattle actually look like?" 

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington law professors Lisa Manheim and Kathryn Watts about their new book, "The Limits of Presidential Power: A Citizen's Guide to the Law."

Flickr Photo/Third Way Think Tank (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/WFNxkD

President Donald Trump talked a lot about immigration in his State of the Union address last night. He said the immigration package in Congress right now would give a path to citizenship for Dreamers, fully secure the border, end the visa lottery and “chain migration.”


Seattle City Hall
Flickr Photo/Daniel X. O'Neil (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1OGMTuh

The #MeToo movement has reached inside the City of Seattle, with city employees speaking out about sexism, discrimination and sexual harassment in the workplace.

As first reported by Crosscut, current and former city employees have formed a group called the Seattle Silence Breakers. Their purpose is to provide support to city employees and spur change.

The Capitol Rotunda is seen with the statue of George Washington on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, ahead of the State of the Union address by President Donald Trump.
AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

President Trump is delivering his State of the Union address to Congress, which will be followed by a response from the Democratic Party. Journalists across the NPR newsroom will be annotating those remarks, adding fact-checks and analysis in real time. 

Today on The Record we're looking at the #MeToo and Time's Up movements here in Washington state. How did we get here and what we can do next?

Michael Perera speaking at a "Why We Stayed Here" event at Theatre Off Jackson on January 17, 2018.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Michael Perera gave this talk as part of a KUOW-sponsored  “Why We Stayed Here” event that took place at Theatre Off Jackson on January 17. It has been edited and republished with permission.

I started putting this talk together the day after it was announced that someone who lives in Seattle is officially the richest person of all time.

I’m guessing it’s not one of the people in this room. But if it is, can you give me a ride home?

Seafood is displayed at Pike Place Fish Market on Tuesday, January 9, 2018, at Pike Place in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

You’ve got a hankering for seafood, but you’re worried about climate change. What should you eat?


Tommy Le's family and attorneys announce their decision to file a $20 million wrongful death and civil rights violation lawsuit against King County, the King County Sheriff's Office and (former) Sheriff John Urquhart in 2017.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Families of police shooting victims in King County will have a new voice during inquests.

The County Council agreed unanimously Monday to let these families have legal representation at these proceedings.


Jeff Bezos laughs while touring The Spheres, which opened on Monday, January 29, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

On Monday, Amazon officially opened The Spheres, the newest addition to the company’s downtown campus. Inside, there are over 40,000 plants from all over the world. 


Poet Melinda Mueller
KUOW Photos / Gil Aegerter

What will it take for Seattle to become climate-friendly?  That's The Burning Question this month on KUOW.

In this interview, reporter David Hyde put the question to Melinda Mueller, a Seattle high school biology teacher and a poet, and the author of "The After," a book of poems that imagines the world after humans have gone extinct. 

Flickr Photo/Tom Davidson (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dQVW4x

Our region’s population hit 4 million people just over a year ago. Now, there’s a prediction that it will reach nearly 6 million by 2050. It’s the latest growth projection from The Puget Sound Regional Council.

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

This week, an Amtrak engineer said he didn't see the signs telling him to slow down before last month's fatal derailment near Tacoma. Amazon opened a convenience store with no checkout lines. Sound Transit might lose a bunch of car-tab tax money. And Edgar Martinez might want to hit Hall of Fame voters with a light bat.

Thaddeus Teo counts the number of people experiencing homelessness during the annual King County Point-In-Time count on Friday, January 25, 2018, on the Marion Street Ferry Walkway in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Hundreds of volunteers scattered across King County early Friday morning to count the number of people experiencing homelessness during the annual King County Point-In-Time count.

The annual count gives a snapshot of the homelessness crisis and, despite King County and Seattle spending tens of millions of dollars on services in recent years, the tally has continued to rise.

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