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Foster High School teacher Lynette Finau, left, told student Lika M.: "I’m a better teacher now, because I look at every student with the assumption what if they’re like Lika?"
StoryCorps

Three years ago, Lika M. and her family were evicted from their home after falling behind on rent payments. At the time, Lika was 14 years old and in eighth grade.

Lika is now a junior at Foster High School in Tukwila. She recently shared her story in front of fellow students during Foster's homecoming assembly. Here she talks with her teacher and adviser, Lynette Finau, about what it's like to attend school while living in a homeless shelter.

The Polar Pioneer at Seattle's Terminal 5, which was closed last year to cargo and needs at least $150 million in investments to ready it for mega-cargo ships - and to compete with Canadian ports.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

The West Coast ports dispute is expected to end Friday.

Shipping companies have already accepted the new contract.

Port workers have also voted on the contract and are expected to release their results today.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Protesters of Arctic drilling have run afoul of the ocean environment in their own small way.

In addition to assembling a flotilla of kayaks on Seattle's Elliott Bay last weekend, the activists brought in a construction barge. It's a solar-powered platform for protests against Shell Oil's plans to drill in the Arctic Ocean. But the protesters anchored their solar barge over one of Seattle's most popular sites for scuba diving. 

Courtesy of George Patterson and Dave Cable

Lt. James Patterson, better known as Kelly, is missing in action.

Patterson went MIA 48 years ago, after his plane was shot down near Hanoi during the Vietnam War.

Brigid Schulte discusses her book "Overwhelmed" at an event in 2014.
Flickr Photo/Howard County Library System (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Americans are famously industrious. The chart of our productivity growth per hour worked from 1948 to 2011 shows a rise of over 250 percent. It’s the classic ‘up and up and where it stops, nobody knows’ graph.

But the fact is, while Americans work longer hours than workers in most other countries, we’re actually less productive than you might think. According to a number of studies, working more than 40 hours a week just makes us less productive. So what would happen if we worked less?

Lying On Shelter Bunk Bed: 'How Did I Get Here?'

May 21, 2015
Franklin and Sherry Gilliard lost their home after their business foundered during the recession. They've since found transitional housing. "But we're thankful that we can come together with our food, with the lights on, with the heat on," Sherry said.
StoryCorps

In 2007, Franklin Gilliard and his wife, Sherry, a teacher’s aide, started their own business: a driving school. Shortly after, they were hit by the recession.

The couple worked hard to stay afloat, but they found themselves drowning in past-due bills and late notices, and they became homeless in 2013. Sherry and Franklin sat down with StoryCorps to talk about their experience.

Eli and Oliver Abrahamson at home in 2012.
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Memorial Day weekend in the Seattle area means barbecues, camping trips and the annual Northwest Folklife Festival.

This four-day festival of folk traditions convenes again Friday, May 22, at the Seattle Center. Attendees can experience everything from do-it-yourself drum circles to square dancing to a bevy of string bands.

Three years ago, we introduced audiences to the Oliver and Eli Abrahamson, two boys who got their musical start busking at Folklife. At the time, they and their parents performed together as the Smalltime String Band.

Sturgeon Poachers Angle For Caviar On The Columbia

May 21, 2015
 The man in this photo has been charged with trying to sell an illegal sturgeon. Police say he used this cellphone photo of himself alongside the fish on the bank of the Columbia River to market the fish.
Courtesy of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The high value of caviar is driving poachers to an inventive way to cash in on giant sturgeon in the Columbia River:

They lash live fish with ropes to the riverbank for safe-keeping until black-market buyers can be located. Enforcement officials have also found sturgeon carcasses floating in the river with their bellies slit open to harvest their eggs.

The forensics lab in Ashland, Oregon, uses state-of-the-art technology to crack cases against endangered species and trafficked trees.
EarthFix/Katie Campbell

Laura Daugherty balances a small tray on one gloved hand, like a waiter at black-tie restaurant.

Today’s main course is ring-necked pheasant – freshly skinned and raw.

Her patrons are a teeming pile of flesh-eating beetles.

Outside the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The immigration detention center in Tacoma has been hit this week by new allegations of abuse by guards.

An incident in mid-April set off this recent flurry of complaints against the Northwest Detention Center. Several detainees say they witnessed guards allegedly assault an elderly man from Honduras.

Makah whalers celebrate atop a dead gray whale after a successful hunt seen in this May 17, 1999, file photo, in Neah Bay, Wash.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Ross Reynolds talks to historian Joshua Reid about his new book, a history of the Makah tribe  titled, “The Sea is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs."   

The Makahs' tribal land occupies  the Northwest corner of Washington state.  They gained worldwide attention in 1999 when they resumed the traditional practice of hunting for grey whales. Reid's book takes a fresh look at the controversy seen through the  history of the Makahs.

Reid, a member of the Snohomish tribe, was born and raised in Washington. In the fall he’ll be at the University of Washington as an associate professor of history and American Indian Studies.

Homeless Children: 'They Were Blaming Themselves'

May 20, 2015
Shelter volunteer Desmond Pullen of Snohomish thanked granddaughter Thandi Venema for helping out: "You know, it’s one thing to empathize with people and it’s another thing to do something about it."
StoryCorps

After Desmond Pullen retired from his job as a school principal in 2005, he started volunteering at a local homeless shelter for families, close to his home in Snohomish. Today, Desmond works at that same shelter as an advocate for children living there.

Desmond came to StoryCorps with his 9-year-old granddaughter Thandi Venema to talk about his work at the shelter and how Thandi has become involved.

An all-female United Airlines crew celebrates picking up a new Boeing 737-900.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

It’s a first for United Airlines.

On Wednesday morning, an all-woman crew and a plane full of female United employees took possession of a new airplane.

It happened at Boeing Field early this morning.

Robert Darden, left, and Anthony Fox moved to Seattle from Nashville. They say they are adamant about living within Seattle city limits, although escalating rents have made that increasingly tough.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

About half the renters in the Seattle region pay too much for their place.

Too much means they’re spending more than a third of their household income before taxes. SeaTac and Rainer Valley neighborhoods are particularly rough on renters, although this trend affects the entire city, regardless of median income. (Check your neighborhood in the interactive graphic below.)

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Teachers marched in the streets of Seattle Tuesday. It was part of a one-day walkout. They were protesting what they call the state Legislature’s failure to fully fund education. 

Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Many of them ended up at Seattle Center.

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