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KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Some NFL players took a knee or sat during the national anthem. The Seahawks stayed in their locker room. Other players stood and locked arms. What does it all matter if the fans tune them out?

Also, Facebook says it will get tougher on fake Russian campaign ads, but what is our responsibility to consume media smartly?

And Washington state sues the maker of OxyContin, but pharmaceutical companies say they don't deserve all the blame because it's doctors who over-prescribed and patients who over-used.

Dulce Palma, right, and classmates join a walkout to support undocumented students.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Students at several high schools in Seattle staged a walkout Thursday in support of their undocumented classmates.

This comes in response to the Trump administration’s phase out of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and a looming October 5 deadline for current DACA recipients to renew their temporary waivers one last time.

Can you have kids and care about climate change? Listeners respond

Sep 29, 2017
Ashley Ahearn with her dog Burnaby
Courtesy of Ashley Ahearn

Should we have kids, given where the planet is headed? It's a deeply personal question that my husband and I are struggling with right now.

Oren Etzioni and Max Tegmark in the KUOW Green Room.
KUOW PHOTO/JASON PAGANO

Tesla CEO Elon Musk made headlines when he urged leaders to intervene in the quest for artificial intelligence, saying the technology “is a fundamental existential risk for human civilization.”

Musk painted a frightening picture of a future where an AI arms race could lead to apocalyptic outcomes for humanity. But KUOW’s Bill Radke recently talked with two AI experts who take a more optimistic view on the role intelligent machines can play in our future.

Oxycodone pills.
Flickr Photo/Be.Futureproof (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4xcHp9

Washington state’s attorney general and the attorney for the city of Seattle have filed separate lawsuits against opioid manufacturers, including OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma.

Both the city and the state claim drug companies have contributed to the ongoing opioid and heroin epidemic.  

PERMISSION FOR ONE TIME USE, DO NOT REUSE
Courtesy of Alan Berner

The cover article of this year’s June issue of The Atlantic magazine concerned a woman called Lola. “My Family’s Slave” was written by Alex Tizon, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Filipino-American writer.

Lola had lived with the Tizon family and cared for them since before Alex Tizon was born. She had come with them from the Philippines to the United States. To Tizon and his siblings, it had always seemed like she was part of the family, until it didn’t.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

Many white Americans believe that black Americans earn close to what their own families make. The truth is far different.

Blacks, on average, earn half of what whites do in this country.

Courtesy of the Konz family

Everyone has a story to tell, and we thought it would be cool to see what they were.

FILE: Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell smiles as he leaves the chamber after announcing the release of the Republicans' health care bill Thursday, June 22, 2017.
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Bill Radke talks to Mary Agnes Carey, senior correspondent covering health reform and federal health policy for Kaiser Health News, about how healthcare policy changes will affect patients. 

Health premiums for Washington state residents who buy into the state exchange can expect an average rise of 24 percent next year.

FILE: Then-Councilmember Tim Burgess signs an official document after taking the oath of office and becoming the mayor of Seattle on Monday, September 18, 2017, at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The Seattle Police Department will take over regulation and management of off-duty work performed by officers under a new executive order from Seattle mayor Tim Burgess.

The order, signed Monday, directs SPD to set up an internal work group run by civilians to oversee outside work.

University of Washington campus at night.
Flickr Photo/Alireza Borhani (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/GgzJYf

Sexual assault has been “a scourge on American (college) campuses” for generations, according to Vanessa Grigoriadis, the author of "Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power, and Consent on Campus."

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Dozens of the worst hazardous-waste sites in the Northwest are not being cleaned up, for lack of personnel to do the job, according to a report from the inspector general of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

T-rex teeth being unearthed at the University of Washington.
KUOW Photo /Casey Martin

Last year paleontologists from the Burke Museum discovered a Tyrannosaurus rex in eastern Montana. The fossil pieces include a complete skull -- one of only 15 ever discovered in the world.

Now you can watch as the skull is being unearthed at an exhibit at the Burke called T-rex Live.

Jean Primozich is one of the volunteers removing dirt and rock from the 3,000 pound skull.

FILE: Teens at the King County Juvenile Detention
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

"You have the right to remain silent."

Most people can recite at least the first line of the Miranda warning used by police when arresting people. The warning informs suspects they don’t have to talk to the police if they don’t want to, and that they have a right to an attorney. But brain scientists say young people often lack the perspective and judgment, especially in the moment, to know what’s in their best interest.

You don’t know Seattle until you see these gritty scenes

Sep 27, 2017
Along with houses of prostitution, First Avenue became home to arcades with coin-operated machines to watch racy moving pictures.
'First Avenue, Seattle' exhibit. Photo by Nancy Walz. ©Pike Place Market PDA 1981.

If you check into most hotels on First Avenue tonight, it'll run you at least $400. Not so in 1981, when low-income people found affordable rooms up and down "Skid Road" in single-room-occupancy hotels — for a night, or for the rest of their lives.

Houses in Queen Anne
Flickr Photo/Harold Hollingsworth (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9C1rMq

Seattle officials are preparing zoning changes for lower Queen Anne to make the area denser. The legislation gained preliminary approval from the city council this month.


The fast ferry between Bremerton and Seattle, the Rich Passage 1, docks at Pier 50 in Seattle, which is just south of Colman Dock.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Bremerton is two months into operating its new fast ferry to Seattle, and now Tacoma is looking into the idea. Tacoma's City Council started discussions this week on the potential benefits of running a foot ferry to-and-from Seattle. City council member Ryan Mello is proposing the idea.

A scene from a simulation by the Washington State Department of Transportation of what could happen if a massive earthquake hits the Alaskan Way Viaduct.
YouTube/WSDOT

Seconds before last week's 7.1 magnitude earthquake in Mexico City, people got an alert that the ground was about to start shaking. The Sistema de Alerta Sismica Mexicano, or SASMEX, gives people a chance to get under a desk or leave a building before the shaking begins. 

King County's juvenile court and jail are located south of Capitol Hill.
Flickr Photo/jseattle

A Washington state appeals court ruled Tuesday that King County has been improperly calculating the property taxes it’s using to fund a new courthouse and youth detention center.

It’s the latest legal ruling in the contentious battle over replacing the facility. 

Mayor Tim Burgess answers questions on Monday, September 18, 2017, after taking the oath of office and becoming the mayor of Seattle, at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Mayor Tim Burgess has unveiled his proposed 2018 city budget.

It's perhaps the most important thing he’ll do in his short time in the mayor’s office and he made sure to insert some of his own priorities into the document before presenting it to council.

Owner JB Dickey says owning a book store is a 'very honorable way of making a living.'
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

Another independent brick-and-mortar bookshop is closing its doors: This week is Seattle Mystery Bookshop’s last after selling mysteries in Pioneer Square for almost 30 years.

A watercolor by Takuichi Fujii painted between May 1942 and October 1945.
Courtesy of Washington State History Museum

A newly exhibited, hand-painted diary from an internment camp is shedding light on wartime experiences here in the Pacific Northwest.

Friends and family in Mexico City write a thank you to people in Seattle who contributed to the earthquake victims.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

SAN GREGORIO ATLAPULCO, MEXICO - A week after Mexico City’s devastating earthquake, donations continue to pour in. One came this week from Seattle and was delivered by hand to a hard hit town. KUOW's Liz Jones just happened to be nearby.


FILE: People begin to gather before a rally protesting President Donald Trump's travel ban on refugees and citizens of seven Muslim-majority nations, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Civil rights organizations in the Northwest plan to fight the Trump administration's latest travel ban. The president wants to limit U.S. travel for people in eight countries, saying it will help prevent terrorism. The restrictions are scheduled to go into effect October 18.

Sara Jacobsen, left, never gave much thought to the Chilkat robe hanging over her dining room table. Until she took a class in high school, when she saw another robe that looked eerily similar to the one at home.
Courtesy of Sara Jacobsen

Sara Jacobsen, 19, grew up eating family dinners beneath a stunning Native American robe.


FILE: Then-Councilmember Tim Burgess signs an official document after taking the oath of office and becoming the mayor of Seattle on Monday, September 18, 2017, at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Mayor Tim Burgess will unveil his 2018 city budget Monday.

Most of the work on the budget had already been done before Burgess ascended to the office of mayor last week.

But he’s included some legislation of his own.

Linda Hargrove discusses using Suboxone with her doctor Grant Scull during an appointment.
KUOW Photo/Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

Linda Hargrove takes white Suboxone tablets daily, dissolving them in her mouth. She’s used to the taste: chalky, not real bitter. Still, Hargrove sips juice from a straw to wash it down. 

The Trump Administration announced Friday it's revoking federal guidance on how campuses investigate sexual assault.

Schools now have the option to require clear evidence that what an accuser says is true, called "the clear and convincing evidence" standard. That's a higher burden of proof than the Obama-era rules.

L-R: Dave Ross, Bill Radke, Joni Balter, Rob McKenna
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Bill apologizes to listeners for our interview with the man from this week's viral Seattle-Nazi-gets-punched video, and we look for the lessons. (see the video and read the transcript)

Seattle gets a new temporary mayor, and the race to replace Eastside Congressman Dave Reichert gets a well-known Republican challenger.

I went undercover in Seattle’s white nationalist group

Sep 22, 2017
Patrik Hermansson, a Swedish activist, spent time with the Northwest Forum in June.
Courtesy of HOPE not hate

For the past year, Patrik Hermansson, a young, gay, anti-racist activist from Sweden has been undercover inside white nationalist — also known as ‘alt-right’ — groups for HOPE not hate, a UK group. One of his assignments took him to Seattle. This is an excerpt from his report.

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