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Washington state's delegates are split on Donald Trump's candidacy -- and his rhetoric.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

This year the Republican presidential nominee has divided the country – and his own party – as much as any nominee in over 40 years.

And much of that has do with his choice of words. 


Alissa Wehrman and Eula Scott Bynoe.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

High-profile killings of black men at the hands of police, as well as shootings of police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge, prompted Eula Scott Bynoe to organize a public discussion with white people about race.


Ijeoma Oluo
Courtesy of Ijeoma Oluo

Deborah Wang talks with Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo about the abuse minority groups receive online

As the U.S. presidential election shifts into the major party convention phase the question arises, how politically polarized are we? As this discussion details, while our political discourse may not have reached historical depths of incivility, sometimes it sure feels that way.

And statistically, both politicians and voters are more polarized now than ever before.

Susan Hutchison, chair of the Washington state Republican Party, at the GOP convention in Cleveland on July 18.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Sen. Ted Cruz spoke at the Republican convention Wednesday night — and got booed.

It wasn't something he said. It was what he didn’t say: He refused to endorse Donald Trump.

And that didn’t sit well with Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison.

Medical residents Bryn Chowchuvech, Bari Laskow and Stephanie Ngo discuss strategy for making their spaghetti dish.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

You don’t expect to see doctors in a kitchen.

Normally you’d find newly minted doctors at Swedish Cherry Hill hospital seeing patients. Instead, a group of them is spending an afternoon chopping onions, red bell peppers and mushrooms under the instruction of Dr. Tanmeet Sethi.


Philipp Mergener, 13, as the lead in the Village Theatre production of the hit musical 'Billy Elliot.'
Courtesy of Village Theatre/Mark Kitaoka

The hit musical, “Billy Elliot,” tells the story of a British coal miner’s son who dreams of being a ballet dancer.

Billy has to keep that dream secret from from his family and most of his friends, or risk their ridicule. Thirteen-year-old Seattle resident Philipp Mergener can relate.


Washington state delegates take a picture with Sen. Ted Cruz, who previously dropped out of the presidential race.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Day three of the Republican National Convention was Ted Cruz's day. Washington state delegates showed up in force for a riverside appearance by the Texas senator, a favorite among our state's GOP delegates.

"Our party now has a nominee," Cruz said to a chorus of boos -- just as Donald Trump's jet passed by on the way to Cleveland's airport. "All right! That was pretty well orchestrated!"

Susan Hutchison, chair of the Washington state Republican Party, at the GOP convention in Cleveland on July 18.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Deborah Wang speaks with Susan Hutchison, chair of the Washington state Republican Party, about Donald Trump's GOP nomination, which was made official Tuesday night.

Hutchison says Trump can win Washington state and it's time for Republicans to get behind the official presidential nominee. 

The Montlake Blvd Market, known as the Hop In, would be torn down to complete construction on 520.
zomato.com

Seattle's Montlake neighborhood faces 11 more years of construction related to the 520 floating bridge, even with the bridge up and running. Transportation officials updated the city this week on plans to replace the western segment of the highway.

Caleb Banta-Green is a UW professor and a member of the King County heroin and prescription opiate task force.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington professor Caleb Banta-Green about a report on 2015 drug trends in King County. It finds heroin overdoses have declined from 2014. Banta-Green is a senior research scientist at the UW's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute.

Lots of members of Washington state's delegation to the GOP convention still back Ted Cruz. They wore these T-shirts Wednesday morning at their hotel in Cleveland.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

In the end, the rebellion was crushed. Donald Trump was nominated as the GOP’s presidential candidate.

All of Washington state’s delegate votes were cast for him Tuesday night at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

“Forty-four votes for Donald J. Trump!” state GOP chair Susan Hutchison said in delivering the delegation on the convention floor.


Washington state Republican delegates get ready to cast their vote for the nomination.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Day two of the Republican National Convention started all abuzz over allegations that Melania Trump's speech the night before plagiarized from Michelle Obama's address at the 2008 Democratic convention. The Trump campaign later denied the charge.

Washington's delegates spent part of the day at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame before heading to the convention's evening festivities.

Washington state schools superintendent Randy Dorn filed a lawsuit Tuesday in King County Superior Court against seven school districts for using levy dollars to boost teacher salaries.

Dorn said the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision was clear: Under the state Constitution, teacher salaries must be funded by the Legislature, not levies. 

Washington state Republican delegate Eric Minor says he will not be voting for Donald Trump in November.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Pandemonium. That’s what broke out on the floor of the Republican National Convention on Monday as a group of delegates tried to derail Donald Trump’s nomination.

It all came down to rules. Getting delegates to pass the rules set out for the convention is usually a formality. But in Cleveland, there was a rebellion.

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