News

The impacts of population growth are visible all around the Puget Sound area: thicker traffic, rising rents. It's also leading to more crowded classrooms, as some families with school kids know.

North of Seattle, Bothell schools in particular are experiencing growing pains. Schools and daycares are nearly filled to the brim.

Growing up in Seattle I spent summer evenings like this picking blackberries.

These days I spend more time trying to fend off blackberry vines in my garden.

If you’ve tried to do that, you’ve probably found that following one long blackberry vine to the source leads to another heading a different direction.

The Sammamish River Valley.
Flickr photo/Keith and Kasia Moore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Seattle Times reporter Lynn Thompson tells KUOW's Kim Malcolm about how farmers and the wine industry are tussling over zoning along a small outpost of agricultural land south of Woodinville.

You can read Thompson's story here.


A large group of mountain goats moves along slope near Mount Baker. The photo was taken from the air in late July by state wildlife researchers.
Courtesy of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

That’s a lot of mountain goats – 90 to be exact. The aerial photo was taken in late July near Mount Baker by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

There's been a recent rebound for a species that was decimated decades ago by hunting, the department’s Rich Harris told KUOW’s Emily Fox.


Anna Ponder teaches a dance called stepping at the Steppers Unite Dance Studio - built in her garage. Ponder dances here with her student, Askia Heru.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Gentrification: It’s what happens when the people living in a low-income neighborhood get pushed out by new people with more money.

But some long-time residents manage to stay in gentrifying neighborhoods and thrive, like Anna Ponder, who teaches a dance style called stepping in Seattle's Columbia City neighborhood.

Monday marked 20 years since the welfare system was overhauled by the federal government. The reforms have played out differently in every state, including Washington.

The 1996 reforms ended some welfare benefits, and in turn encouraged people to find work by offering job-training and money for things like child care.

Courtesy of Washington OSPI / Bobbi Stockwell

After Michael Brown was killed in Ferguson, Missouri two years ago, Nathan Bowling's students came to him for guidance.

Bowling is a teacher at Lincoln High School in Tacoma, where he teaches AP government and politics.

"Mike Brown had just graduated. He's their age. There was just a panic in the room: what if this happens to me? What if this happens to someone we know?" Bowling told KUOW's Bill Radke.

birth control contraception
Flickr Photo/Raychel Mendez (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7o4hRZ

People’s medical records and personal information are protected under federal law, but there’s a loophole in the law that allows employers to access information about employees’ health.

You know those wellness programs that employers use to help improve workers’ health?  They hold a wealth of information about employees: their lifestyles, diet, and medication, including birth control. 

People walk along sun-baked University Way Northeast in Seattle on Friday.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

If you're dripping with sweat during this heat spell, you can blame Canada (kind of).

Washington state climatologist Nick Bond told KUOW's Kim Malcolm that warm air is flowing down from the northeast, contributing to this hot weather.

The only dog park with a beach in Seattle is at Magnuson Park in northeast Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC BY 2.0) http://bit.ly/2bT4lEW

In these hot August days, you're likely to see a lot more dogs taking a swim in Seattle. But there's only one beach dogs are allowed in Seattle, and that's in Magnuson Park.

There won't be as many happy test-takers in the new future, predicts the Washington State Department of Licensing. That's because a new test replaces the old one on Monday, and there will be more questions.
Flickr Photo/John Meehan CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 http://bit.ly/2boP91R

A new Washington state driver's test debuted on Monday.

The number of questions has been upped to 40, and there are some new topics.

The Tyrannosaurus Rex skull arrives at the Burke Museum in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Paige Browning

There's a Tyrannosaurus rex in Seattle.

A team from the Burke Museum and University of Washington dug up the skull and other bones in Montana last month. It arrived at the museum Thursday.


Simone Biles, a 4'8" package of muscle, performs at an Olympic exhibition gala after having won four gold medals and one bronze in the 2016 Games. What she is wearing is not relevant.
AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky

It's heartbreaking to Lindy West that young women work hard, become the best in the world at a difficult sport, and their moment of triumph turns into: "Man's sex companion does something, I guess." 

West laughed as she said this. But it's not really a joke. In fact, she's incensed by the way female Olympians have been talked about during the Rio Olympics. 

kids at play
Flickr Photo/guilherme jofili (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8Gw7aW

Dr. Peter Gray is an evolutionary research psychologist. He focuses on our education system and how children learn naturally. And that’s the rub: Gray points to the many ways our schools impede natural learning, with disturbing consequences.

His research and writing shed light on how the creativity and skills we establish in free play influence learning.

Pages