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'Week in Review' panel Ross Reynolds, Claudia Balducci, Joni Balter and Rob McKenna.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Will the city come to a standstill with the viaduct closed? That isn't the only transportation story this week, we're also talking about Sound Transit 3.  And can you win an election without big donations? Why aren't more people furious about Troy Kelley? Plus, a round up of this week in pot. 

Ross Reynolds talks the week's news with former Attorney General Rob McKenna, Seattle Channel's Joni Balter and King County Councilmember Claudia Balducci. 

The groups facing off on the proposed ballot measure are Just Want Privacy and Washington Won't Discriminate.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

A group in Washington state wants to force transgender people to use bathrooms and locker rooms corresponding to their biological sex.

Joe Wolf / Flickr

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is holding an Education Summit at Garfield High School on Saturday to look at ways the city can help improve the academic success of low-income students and children of color.

Bellevue High School fans cheer during the first half of the team's Class 3A high school football championship game against Eastside Catholic, Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

When you think high school, do you think math class? Or do you think about the Friday night lights, the pep rallies and the spirit days?

Let's face it, high school sports are big in this country. By placing such a big emphasis on sports, some schools are sending kids the wrong message, said Amanda Ripley, an education journalist and author.

Two workers walk through the first rings of the tunnel toward Bertha, the SR 99 tunneling machine.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bertha the tunneling machine will slowly grind its way below the foundations of the viaduct over the next two weeks.

Thomas Merton Center dinner honoring Bill McKibben, 11/4/2013
Flickr Photo/Mark Dixon (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/hkccL6

On his recent visit to Seattle, author and environmentalist Bill McKibben apologized for his “life’s work of bumming people out” about climate change. He continued with that sobering work in this talk at Town Hall Seattle, but not without sharing his optimism about the successes and the future of the environmental movement.

Half of the workplace deaths involved people over the age of 50 – not people who died of heart attacks, but people who fell or injured themselves on the job.
KUOW photo

Worker Memorial Day, the day Washington State honors people who lost their lives on the job, is this Thursday.

Barbara Hagstrom of Duvall shows off her Trump t-shirt at the 5th Legislative District GOP Caucus.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The Republican presidential contest is going to be heating up very quickly in Washington state.

All three GOP candidates have announced that they are coming here to campaign before the state's primary.

Tacoma School District officials will test every school's water quality. That's after results from last May showed unacceptable levels of lead in six Tacoma schools.

District officials say they're investigating why no one took action to fix the problems.

Is it a problem when white chefs cook other people’s food?

Apr 26, 2016
Angela Garbes, food writer at The Stranger.
Courtesy of Angela Garbes

When you go to a restaurant that touts itself as Korean, French, Mexican or Italian—it’s hard to know exactly what that means. And you might accidentally be stepping into murky food politics by going to one. How? If the chef is white and making money off the cuisine of people of color.

Seattle chef Edouardo Jordan at his restaurant in Ravenna, Salare.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

This week, we explored what it means when a white chef earns a reputation from cooking the food of people of color.

Here in Seattle, we met a chef who had the opposite problem.

Seattle Public Utilities says its dams are about three-quarters full.
Flickr photo/Konstantin Stepanov (CC BY 2.0)

Recent, routine tests in Seattle Public Schools found that 49 schools had at least one faucet with lead levels above the district’s acceptable limit.

The district’s lead threshhold is stricter than federal standards: 10 parts per billion, compared to 20.

A bus moves into traffic on Delridge Way in West Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

King County Metro plans to increase transit service in the next five years, and it plans to do so without adding more greenhouse gas emissions.

City of Seattle

A majority of Seattle City council members voted in favor of the legislation and said it will help them meet an increased workload now that most council members represent geographic districts.

The lobby at Exeter House, which was built as a luxury, live-in hotel in the 1920s.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Exeter House in downtown Seattle was built as an apartment hotel for elegant living in the 1920s. It was part of a construction boom downtown at the time.

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