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King County executive Dow Constantine presents West Seattle Fish House with an 'Excellent' food safety rating
Courtesy of King County

People eating out in King County now have a new way to compare restaurants. King County Public Health began phasing in new food safety rating signs Tuesday.

Instead of a pass/fail system or traditional letter grades, you'll start to see emojis hanging in restaurant windows.

File photo of Uber driver at  near the San Francisco International Airport.
AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

The global ride-hailing company Uber is suing the city of Seattle. Uber is challenging new city rules that allow for-hire drivers to unionize.

I first met the artist Jacob Lawrence in his attic.

That was more than 30 years ago, on a gray day, not so unusual for Seattle. A small window let in pearly light that flattered the paintings leaning against the wall. The vivid primary colors seemed to pop off his canvases. Lawrence told me the light was something he enjoyed about the Pacific Northwest.

Elizabeth Mehlbrech lives in Marysville, where she finds the rent for new apartments more affordable than other places closer to Seattle. Mehlbrech manages Fitness Evolution, near The Lodge Apartments, where she also lives.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The further people flee from the major metro areas, the cheaper the housing. But there’s only so far they can run, because there’s an imaginary wall that stops development from sprawling all over the landscape, a wall that protects the less developed green places that make the region beautiful. 

It’s called the urban growth boundary. Beyond it, developers face more restrictions. 

Just inside the boundary, Marysville, Washington is growing fast as existing rents trend higher and higher. For those who can't afford it, there's nowhere left to go.

Benjamin Hunter at Mt. Zion Baptist Church
Courtesy of Seattle Colleges

For his 1967 speech “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence,” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote:

"We are now faced with the fact, my friends, that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time.”

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Twitter

If you’re a person of color in this country, every day you might encounter oppression that remains from systems set in motion hundreds of years ago.

The inequity that results affects everything from jobs to education to housing to health care. Given our history, what would it take to really bring racial equity?


Teatro Zinzanni, on lower Queen Anne in Seattle
KUOW photo, Marcie Sillman

Seattle’s long-running cabaret/dinner theater Teatro Zinzanni has been drawing crowds to its elegant vintage tent on lower Queen Anne since 2007.

The tent sits on land just north of Seattle Center; the land was given to Seattle Opera as potential funding source for a new home adjacent to Marion Oliver McCaw Hall.

Photo via Flickr creative commons Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday. The event will be marked across the country by both celebrations and protests. 

Here are some of the events taking place in Seattle and the surrounding area this week. 

As a new president takes office Friday, the City of Seattle will mark the occasion with a huge event for immigrants and refugees. It’s a symbolic contrast to events in Washington, D.C. And it also aims to help about a thousand immigrants with citizenship applications and other legal services.

Flickr photo by Bo ("call me Daniel") Gao. (CC BY-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/7KH9gD

To our listeners and readers:

On the eve of the Trump presidency, we will be publishing letters from you to a loved one. Would you join us?

You can love Trump or hate him. You can write three sentences or a thousand words. All we ask is that you speak from the heart. Some questions to get you thinking: 

*What is most important to you right now?

*What goes through your mind when you think about the next four years? 

*How do you believe your life will change with Trump as president?

A fire on Saturday morning burned down a large part of the Islamic Center of the Eastside, a mosque in Bellevue.
Bellevue Fire Department

Updated 8:42 p.m.

A fire burned down most of a mosque in Bellevue early on Saturday morning, just one day after a man was charged with a hate crime for threatening members of that mosque in October.

There were no injuries.

Amazon announced on Thursday that it’s adding 100,000 jobs nationwide by the middle of 2018.

It's a huge growth spurt for the Seattle-based company. The hiring will boost Amazon's U.S. workforce from 180,000 to 280,000 people in just 18 months time. The company had just 30,000 workers back in 2010.

week in review ijeoma vance marcus radke
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

President Barack Obama gave his final address to the nation this week. We’ll take a look back at his legacy as the first African-American president of the United States.

An unverified dossier was released this week about President-elect Donald Trump and his relationship with Russia. Trump called the information “a disgrace” and said the events laid out in the dossier “didn’t happen.”


Trains running through Marysville can be up six minutes long, which doesn't sound like a lot unless you are constantly getting stuck in their traffic backup.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Donald Wilson should be eating breakfast with his friends at the Tulalip Casino. But Wilson is not eating breakfast. He’s sitting in his car, at a railroad crossing.

It's a situation he faces just about every other day when he's just trying to get from one side of town to the other. "Every time we run into the train," he said, "it’s like, ‘God darn it!’”


Megan Moffat Sather and her daughter, Winslow
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

As soon as the presidential election results were in, Megan Moffat Sather of West Seattle got a call from her lawyer: It was time to adopt her 6-month-old daughter, Winslow.

"I have to go through something that I think is actually humiliating," Moffat Sather said. "I have to pay my own money for someone to come into my home and to judge whether or not I should be able to be the parent to my own child."

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