KUOW Presents

No longer on air.
Joshua McNichols

KUOW Presents connects listeners to a diversity of stories and perspectives from around the Pacific Northwest and around the world on topics that matter to our daily lives.

To find stories by KUOW Presents older than October 15, 2012, go to www2.kuow.org and select "KUOW Presents" from the show dropdown menu in the search function.

Composer ID: 
5182a71ae1c89ec2617cc332|5182a70fe1c89ec2617cc30a

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Memoir
2:00 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

Eric Nuzum On "Giving Up The Ghost"

Are you afraid of ghosts?
Flickr photo/Energetic Spirit

Eric Nuzum is vice president of programming for NPR and a writer. He’s also afraid of ghosts. When he was young, Eric became convinced he was being haunted by the ghost of a little girl who lived in his parents’ attic. It started as a weird premonition during his dreams and ended with Eric in a mental ward, having apparently destroyed his life before it truly began. The only thing that kept him from the brink was his friendship with a girl named Laura, a classmate who was equal parts devoted friend and enigmatic crush.

Even now as a fully functioning member of society with a great job and family, Eric still can’t stand to have any shut doors in his house for fear of what’s on the other side. So in order to finally face his fears, he enlists some friends on a journey to America’s most haunted places. Eric Nuzum's book is titled "Giving Up the Ghost: A Story About Friendship, 80s Rock, a Lost Scrap of Paper, and What It Means to Be Haunted." Eric Nuzum told Wisconsin Public Radio's Anne Strainchamps about his fears.

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Brain Science
2:00 pm
Tue October 30, 2012

Cathy Davidson On How The Brain Science Of Attention Will Change Our Lives

Would you notice a gorilla in the crowd?
Flickr photo/tnarik

One of the most famous psychological experiments of all time is called the attention blindness test, also known as the gorilla experiment. Here's how it goes. First, researchers sit their subjects down to watch a video of a basketball game. Then they tell the subjects to count the number of passes made. After a minute or so, a person in a gorilla suit walks right into the middle of the game, in full view of the camera. Now, here’s the fun part. When the researchers ask their subjects who saw the gorilla, more than half say they didn't. That's because the subjects were too focused on counting passes.

Duke University Professor Cathy Davidson says we can learn something important from this experiment. Davidson is the author of "Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn." She tells Wisconsin Public Radio's Anne Strainchamps why attention blindness matters.

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Currency
2:00 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

"It's Just Dreadful:" The Design Of US Money

US currency
Credit Flickr photo/401(K) 2012

When designers look at US money, they usually see a whole host of problems. Aside from being just busy and confusing to look at, US money is so poorly designed that people who are sight-impaired can't even really use it. Yet there's no real movement in this country to change how our money's designed. Producer Roman Mars finds another country's currency that's designed with the user in mind.

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Choral Singing
4:57 pm
Fri October 26, 2012

Seattle's Tudor Choir: Twenty Years Of Vocal Excellence

Seattle's Tudor Choir sings choral music from Renaissance England and colonial America.
Credit Photo courtesy Tudor Choir

Seattle’s Tudor Choir is a 20 year-old institution founded by a University of Washington student with a passion for music and history. During his years at the University of Washington, Tudor Choir founder and artistic director Doug Fullington put together a group of fellow students to sing English Renaissance music associated with the Tudor Monarchy of the 15th and 16th centuries.

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Diversity On The Force
2:00 pm
Fri October 26, 2012

Tough As Nails: The Story Of Oklahoma City's First Openly Transgender Police Officer

Credit Flickr photo/Tom Magliery

Paula Sophia Schonauer is a 20-year veteran with the Oklahoma City Police Department. She’s also the agency's first openly transgender officer. When Paula was a man, she was the star cop in her police force. But when she transitioned to female, her past successes and reputation as top cop evaporated. Her colleagues didn’t think she could do the job she had excelled in for so many years as a man. In Tough as Nails, Paula told NPR Producer Stephanie Foo about her journey changing from police man, to police woman.

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Breast Cancer Art
2:00 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Turning Breast Cancer Tumors Into Tangible Art

A sculpture of a tumor made by caraballo-farman for Object Breast Cancer
Credit Photo: caraballo-farman

The pink ribbon has been an incredibly successful piece of marketing for breast cancer research. But for new media artist and cancer survivor Leonor Caraballo, that pink ribbon is supremely annoying. She always hated the color pink, and Caraballo wanted to come up with a symbol that she didn't find infantilizing.

As an artist, Caraballo collaborates with her husband, Abou Farman, under the name caraballo-farman. And the couple came up with a new approach to representing breast cancer that's very different from pink ribbons. They started making bronze models of real tumors, created from MRI scans, that you can wear around your neck or put on your desk.

In his story, Object Breast Cancer, Independent Producer Eric Molinsky also discovered that this artwork is creating buzz among cancer researchers.

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Human Experience
2:00 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Road Rage And The Science Of Revenge

If you've ever been cut off in traffic by a rude driver, you probably know how it feels to suddenly want revenge. Clare Lawlor acted on that impulse, and sought revenge on another motorist. Her actions caused her to wonder about why humans feel the need to take vengeance - especially when, as Clare learned, it rarely works out well. Clare told the CBC's Sook Yin Lee what happened between her and the other driver.

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Communication
2:00 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

DeafSpace: The Absence Of Sound

The acoustics of a building are a big concern for architects. But for designers at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC, it’s the absence of sound that defines the approach to architecture. Gallaudet is a university dedicated to educating the deaf and hard of hearing, and since 2005, university officials have rethought principles of architecture with one question at the forefront: how do deaf people communicate in space? Producer Roman Mars examines that question.

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Film
2:00 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Sci-Fi Movies About Today's Human Struggles

Human beings struggle regularly with cultural differences. We encounter sensitive situations when people look differently than we do, communicate in a different way or eat different foods. Leilani Nishime is a University of Washington assistant communications professor. She says that a lot of wisdom and insight around communication across cultures comes from science fiction movies. LeiLani Nishime speaks with KUOW’s Jamala Henderson about three films she recommends watching. 

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Travel
2:00 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

A Travel Tip For The Pacific Northwest

Pacific Northwest residents often speak of those places in our region that they hope to visit one day. But in the Northwest we often avoid those destinations - in part, because of all the touristy crowds. Seattle travel writer Crai Bower says fall is a great time to visit those iconic locations. That’s because all the tourists are gone now. And as residents, this is our time to visit. This fall, Crai recommends taking a trip to Mount St. Helens. He speaks with KUOW’s Dave Beck.

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Travel
12:54 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Northwest Travel Writer Recommends Visiting Mount St. Helens This Fall

Seattle travel writer Crai Bower
Courtesy of Crai Bower

Seattle travel writer Crai Bower first came across Mount St. Helens when he was doing a census of the spotted owl population for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources in 1990. Crai was stunned by the vision of Mount St. Helens, which so famously and destructively erupted in 1980. Crai remembers seeing the mountain as he walked down a forest service road:

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Cold War Culture
1:21 pm
Thu October 18, 2012

Rocky And Bullwinkle And The Cuban Missile Crisis

"The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show" debuted on television screens in 1959. The cartoon featured an all-American squirrel and his pal the moose hotly pursued by Boris and Natasha — the Russian-accented spies with a knack for falling on their own grenades. "The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show" parodied the space race, the arms race between the US and the Soviets, and also took its share of digs at the American government and military. In an era when Yogi Bear was stealing pies off window sills — never before had an animated cartoon carried such political currency. And as Studio 360’s Julia Wetherell reports in Rocky and Bullwinkle and the Cuban Missile Crisis, it just might have predicted the fall of communism.

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Creativity
12:39 pm
Wed October 17, 2012

The Surprising Path Of Inspiration That Resulted In Those GEICO Caveman Ads

In 2003, Noel worked at an ad agency. Like everyone else at the agency, Noel wanted to work with high-profile, flashy clients like Apple. Then an insurance company hired the ad agency, and everyone, including Noel, hoped to avoid what looked like a boring job for a boring client. Of course, Noel got stuck working with the insurance company, trying to help them explain how simple it was to sign up for their insurance online. That insurance company was GEICO. And Noel’s work led to GEICO’s well-known caveman ads. In an interview titled "What Gave You That Idea?" with producer Starlee Kine, we're guided back through Noel's surprising, culturally rich path of inspiration. 

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Elections 2012
12:24 pm
Tue October 16, 2012

Idaho Voters Will Decide On Three Education Laws, Could Lead Major Reform

Idaho is considering whether to keep three education laws that overhaul everything from how teachers are paid to how kids learn in the classroom.

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Crime
12:34 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Washington’s Most Wanted

To the world, Richard was Washington state’s Most Wanted, a thief and a murderer. But Richard’s chaplain Chris didn’t see him that way. To Chris, Richard was a sweet, well-meaning man who just wanted to be seen. Chris tells his story today.

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