feminism http://kuow.org en Gloria Steinem On What's Next For Feminism http://kuow.org/post/gloria-steinem-whats-next-feminism <p>Steve Scher talks with Gloria&nbsp;Steinem, women's rights movement leader and founder of <a href="http://www.msmagazine.com/">Ms. Magazine</a>, about what modern feminism means and her goals for the next 30 years. She visited KUOW in 2006. Tue, 25 Mar 2014 23:26:54 +0000 Steve Scher & Hannah Burn 31269 at http://kuow.org Gloria Steinem On What's Next For Feminism Tavi-In-Chief: 'You Can Be A Feminist And Also Like Stuff' http://kuow.org/post/tavi-chief-you-can-be-feminist-and-also-stuff <p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/128743080&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>There are a lot of stereotypical images of teenage girls: vain, ditzy, obsessed with pop music. Tavi Gevinson makes it her job to break these stereotypes. As she sees it, "A lot of teenage girls are very articulate and maybe they like Taylor Swift and One Direction, but that doesn’t mean that they aren’t also smart and strong.”</p> Tue, 14 Jan 2014 19:08:25 +0000 Kendra Hanna & RadioActive Youth Media 26826 at http://kuow.org Tavi-In-Chief: 'You Can Be A Feminist And Also Like Stuff' Katniss Everdeen: The New Superwoman? http://kuow.org/post/katniss-everdeen-new-superwoman <p>Steve Scher talks with film historian Caetlin&nbsp;Benson-Allott, <span style="line-height: 1.5;">assistant professor of English, film and media studies at Georgetown University, about a new genre of Hollywood heroines.</span> Thu, 21 Nov 2013 23:48:48 +0000 Steve Scher & Christine Streich 24244 at http://kuow.org Katniss Everdeen: The New Superwoman? Gloria Steinem, Gang Violence And Talking To Kids About Sex http://kuow.org/post/gloria-steinem-gang-violence-and-talking-kids-about-sex <p><strong>Gloria Steinem: The Next 30 Years</strong></p><p></p><p>Gloria Steinem, founder of Ms. Magazine, leader of the women’s movement and journalist, visited KUOW in 2006. Steve Scher talked with Steinem about what modern feminism means and her goals for the next 30 years.</p><p><strong>Gang Violence In Seattle And Tacoma</strong></p><p></p><p>In 2006, Seattle and Tacoma saw a sudden surge in gang violence. Rival gangs were battling over street corners and engaging in drive-by shootings. Steve Scher talked with Lt. Eric Sano of the Seattle Police Department, Gabriel Morales who trains law enforcement officials to prevent gang violence, and Dennis Turner, a former gang-member-turned prevention specialist in Pierce County. Steve asks why these gangs were proliferating, what can be do to prevent them and we hear personal stories of gang life.</p><p><strong>Talking To Kids About Sex</strong></p><p></p><p>It may well be the subject every parent dreads: the sex talk. But Amy Lang, founder of Birds + Bees + Kids, is here to make it easier. Marcie Sillman talked with Lang back in 2006 about strategies to talk to kids about sex.</p><p> Thu, 22 Aug 2013 13:00:00 +0000 weekday 18565 at http://kuow.org Gloria Steinem, Gang Violence And Talking To Kids About Sex Weighing The Impact Of The Feminine Mystique With Stephanie Coontz http://kuow.org/post/weighing-impact-feminine-mystique-stephanie-coontz <p>Fifty years ago Betty Friedan published "The Feminine Mystique." It's been called one of the most important books of the 20th century. Stephanie Coontz is the author of a book about the impact of "The Feminine Mystique." It's called "A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s." Coontz says she was 19 when the book was published and she heard about it from her mom. Ross Reynolds talks with Coontz about the impact and importance of the book that many say sparked the second-wave feminist movement.&nbsp;</p><p> Tue, 19 Feb 2013 20:20:00 +0000 Producer 8448 at http://kuow.org Weighing The Impact Of The Feminine Mystique With Stephanie Coontz At 50, Does 'Feminine Mystique' Still Roar? http://kuow.org/post/50-does-feminine-mystique-still-roar In 1963, Betty Friedan called it "the problem that has no name" and then proceeded to name it — and the name stuck. The problem was "The Feminine Mystique," which was also the title of her groundbreaking book, published 50 years ago.<p>Since its first publication in 1963, millions of people have read <em>The Feminine Mystique</em>. These days, many people read it in college — often in women's studies classes. Mon, 11 Feb 2013 18:37:32 +0000 Lynn Neary 8028 at http://kuow.org At 50, Does 'Feminine Mystique' Still Roar?