News

Alaskan Way Viaduct
8:11 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Problems And Progress For Seattle's Waterfront Tunnel

Architect Brian Runberg climbing onto the roof of the building he owns, with a building motion detector above him and the Alaskan Way Viaduct directly behind him.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

The world’s largest tunneling machine started grinding into the soil beneath downtown Seattle Tuesday afternoon. The machine known as Bertha is digging a 58-foot-wide tunnel to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

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Human Trafficking
1:06 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

FBI Sweep Includes Victims And Pimps In Seattle Area

Over the last several days the FBI, in cooperation with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, conducted its seventh cross-country sweep looking to help stop child sex trafficking. The FBI worked with local police agencies, helped recover victims who have been forced into prostitution, and made arrests. About 50 different task forces participated.

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Wrongful Conviction Legislation
12:34 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Exonerated Convict Is Ready To Test Washington’s New Law

Alan Northrop speaks with media members in May following the signing into law by Gov. Jay Inslee a measure that would allow people who have been wrongfully convicted to seek state compensation for the years they were imprisoned.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

A new law that took effect this week in Washington allows people wrongfully convicted of crimes to sue the state for damages. Alan Northrop will be one of the first to file a claim.

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Listener Call-In
11:32 am
Tue July 30, 2013

The Conversation Heads To Summer Camp

Flickr Photo/dierken

Summer camp can be a magical place for kids, full of craft time, first kisses, freedom from parents and sleeping under the stars. Of course, it can also mean snakes, mean kids and wedgies. Did you go to summer camp? Did anything memorable happen? Can you still sing your old camp song? Break out the s’mores, gather around the fire and we’ll swap stories.

Aging Population
11:21 am
Tue July 30, 2013

The Dangers Of Senior Assisted Living

Flickr Photo/ma neeks

Seattle-based Emeritus Senior Living is the country’s largest assisted living operator, housing approximately 37,000 elderly Americans in more than 400 facilities across the country. Frontline and ProPublica teamed up to investigate reports on the failures of Emeritus. The year-long investigation resulted in a series of articles and a documentary on the dangers of senior care. Ross Reynolds hears from A.C. Wilson, a reporter at ProPublica, about the dark side of senior assisted living.

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Soldier Award
8:19 am
Tue July 30, 2013

JBLM Solider To Receive Medal Of Honor

Staff Sgt. Ty Carter.
US Army

A solider from Joint Base Lewis-McChord will be awarded the Medal of Honor.

Spokane-born Staff Sgt. Ty Carter of  will be one of only a handful of living American soldiers to receive the nation’s highest military honor. The Army says US troops were far outnumbered that day in 2009 at Combat Outpost Keating in eastern Afghanistan. During the battle the Army says Carter killed enemy troops and risked his own life to save an injured soldier pinned down by a barrage of enemy fire.

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Family Hopes For Release
4:46 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Will Jimmy Carter Help Free Lynnwood Man Held In North Korea?

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Several news outlets reported Monday that former President Jimmy Carter may travel to North Korea to secure the release of Kenneth Bae, who's been imprisoned in North Korea for nine months.

The unconfirmed reports raised hopes for Bae's family members, though they said they had not been informed of any specific plans to seek his release.

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Shellfish Industry
9:36 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Scientists Embark On West Coast Ocean Acidification Mission

The shellfish industry, which injects about $111 million each year into the Pacific Northwest's economy, is particularly at risk from the threat of ocean acidification.
Credit EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

On Monday scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will begin a one-month US West Coast expedition to investigate ocean acidification, an issue that poses a serious threat to the Pacific Northwest’s shellfish industry.

“We will for the first time not only study the chemistry of acidification, but also study the biological impacts on the marine ecosystems in the open ocean,” says Richard A. Feely, a scientist from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Research Laboratory in Seattle. Feely is co-chief of the mission.

Read the full story at KUOW's EarthFix.

Health Insurance
9:25 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Health Exchange Foreign Language Fact Sheets Get Poor Marks

Washington Health Benefit Exchange

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:02 am

Call it a case of “lost in translation.” Washington and Oregon’s new health insurance exchanges are getting poor marks for their efforts to communicate with foreign language audiences.

On the Washington Health Benefit Exchange website you can find fact sheets in eight foreign languages – from Cambodian to Somali. These one and two page documents are supposed to help uninsured families navigate the new world of the Affordable Care Act.

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Climate Change
9:24 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Field Test Near Pasco Renews Attention On Viability Of Carbon Storage

Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 8:34 am

The viability of carbon capture and storage can spark lively debate among climate scientists, activists and industry. This week, technicians in southeast Washington continue a field test to show how carbon dioxide could be injected and trapped deep underground.

It's an experiment led by the Pacific Northwest National Lab. Injection of fifty tanker truck loads of CO2 will take about four weeks. Then comes about a year and a half of monitoring to see if the global warming gas stays locked away forever beneath ancient lava flows.

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Radioactive Waste
9:16 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Cleanup Options For Hanford's 300 Area Going Public

Hanford.gov

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:02 am

Federal officials are trying to figure out what to do about radioactive materials that remain at a place near the Columbia River known as the 300 Area. It’s the subject of a series of public meetings that kick off this week.

The 300 Area was where workers milled uranium rods and tested ways to process plutonium during WWII and the Cold War. They poured about 2 million gallons of radioactive liquid waste a day into sandy ponds and trenches right next to the Columbia River. Cleaning up buildings and material there has kept crews busy for 20 years.

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Dance
9:05 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Preserving Balanchine's Ballet Legacy, 30 Years Later

Dancers perform George Balanchine's Serenade in a 2007 production staged by Francia Russell and Suzanne Schorer at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow.
Maxim Marmur AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 9:59 am

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Ticketing Marijuana Use
4:39 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Smoking Pot In Public In Seattle Could Cost You

Seattle City Council is considering a law that would make public pot smoking a ticketable offense. Tickets would cost more than $100 dollars, mirroring a state law. At the playground at Cowan Park in Seattle on Friday, people had mixed reactions to banning pot smoking in public.

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Abandoned Seal Pups
10:14 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Fisheries Officials Say To Leave Seals Alone

Flickr Photo/Tom Talbott

In the Olympia area, a woman reported a weeks-old harbor seal pup is on a railroad trestle on the Woodard Bay beach. Its mother was gone and it was crying.

The woman told The Olympian newspaper she’s afraid the pup is dying. But Fisheries officials are adamant: leave it alone.

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Raising The Minimum Wage
9:28 am
Fri July 26, 2013

SeaTac City Council Signs Off On “Good Jobs Initiative"

A food court at Sea-Tac airport. The initiative would cover about 6,500 workers, including those who work at airport restaurants.
Flickr Photo/Matt Biddolph

People in the City of SeaTac could vote this November on an initiative that would create a $15 an hour hour minimum wage for thousands of workers at Sea-Tac airport and other places. The so-called “Good Jobs Initiative” would apply to about 6,500 workers in transportation and hospitality jobs in the City of SeaTac. Tuesday night, the SeaTac City Council decided to allow the measure to go before voters.

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