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In light of President Donald Trump’s contentious immigration order, Washington lawmakers started making moves of their own. At a press conference in Olympia Thursday, faith leaders said they want to help.

The chief executives of Alaska Airlines, Southwest and Delta Air Lines had positive reactions after a White House meeting with President Donald Trump Thursday morning.

Attorney General Bob Ferguson, left, greets Allen Novak, newly-arrived from Iran, his wife Jayne and their daughter Nikta, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, at Sea-Tac Airport. Allen Novak joined his family, of Silverdale, Wash., on a conditional resident visa.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal appeals court refused Thursday to reinstate President Donald Trump's ban on travelers from seven predominantly Muslim nations, unanimously rejecting the administration's claim of presidential authority and questioning its motives.

KUOW Photo/Andy Hurst

Our Immigration Team has been talking with people from local communities who are affected by President Trump's travel ban. Mohamud Yussuf tells KUOW why he was initially was okay with President Trump winning the election, and why now he's afraid to leave the country, despite being a U.S. citizen. Yussuf is a Somali-American who publishes Runta News, which covers the Somali community in the Puget Sound region.

The three busiest mountain highway passes in the Washington Cascades remain closed at this hour due to high avalanche danger. The Washington Department of Transportation said Snoqualmie Pass may open Thursday night. The latest on White Pass is that it will remain closed overnight.

There’s a movement sweeping states across the nation, known as the “Right to Work.” State Senators in Olympia heard a bill Wednesday that would bring it to Washington.

Courtesy of Rabaa family

They were ready. They had even packed gifts for relatives who would greet them in Seattle.

Then a snowstorm delayed the flight.

And the very next day, President Trump signed his temporary immigration ban.


Drivers and professional lobbyists for the ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft are urging state lawmakers to replace what they call a "patchwork" of city regulations with uniform statewide rules for their industry. They testified in Olympia Wednesday that this would expand the availability of the smartphone-based ride-booking services.

Nordstrom in pink, downtown Seattle, November 2014.
Flickr Photo/Matthew Rutledge (CC BY 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/pWEUux

President Donald Trump called Seattle-based retailer Nordstrom "terrible" on Wednesday for dropping his daughter Ivanka Trump's line of clothing. He also tweeted that Nordstrom had treated her "so unfairly."

Discussions are under way in Oregon's capitol over whether to change or delay implementation of a voter-approved ballot measure on high school education.

Some Oregon farming groups want state lawmakers to allow counties to regulate or even ban genetically engineered crops. The legislature took away that right in 2013 during a special session. At the time, opponents of genetically engineered crops were told that a statewide policy would be forthcoming.

KUOW Photo/Andy Hurst

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle attorney Takao Yamada about airportlawyer.org, a website he co-founded to provide legal assistance to refugees and immigrants affected by President Trump's travel ban.

Domestic abusers, felons and fugitives are prohibited from owning guns. But what happens if they try to buy a gun? In Oregon, the State Police investigate or alert local police. In Washington state no one follows up.

But that could soon change.

In a ruling Wednesday, U.S. District Judge William Orrick ordered more water releases from dams on the Klamath River to flush out parasites causing deadly disease outbreaks in salmon.

In recent drought years, scientists have found extremely high rates of a disease caused by an intestinal parasite known as Ceratanova shasta in salmon populations protected under the Endangered Species Act.

FLICKR PHOTO/TDLUCAS (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nNMBep

Port of Seattle commissioners stood by their decision to pay around 650 employees close to $5 million in bonus pay, even though a routine state audit found the payments violated the Washington state constitution. Still, commissioners will attempt to collect some of the money back and are weighing future legal action.


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