News

Sports Industry
12:19 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Has Seattle Sounders’ Success Trickled Down Into Pioneer Square?

Salvatore Savago, "The Hot Dog King," sells about $1,000 worth of tube steaks on Sounders game days. That's more than three times his regular haul.
Credit KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Sounders FC soccer team played their first Major League Soccer game five years ago Wednesday. In that time, the team’s fans have broken attendance records over and over.

But has the team’s financial success trickled down into the community? It depends on who you ask.

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Grand Coulee Dam
9:46 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Tribes Push To Restore Salmon To Upper Columbia River

A pre-conference tour of Grand Coulee Dam on Monday kicked off a conversation about restoring salmon to the Upper Columbia Basin.
Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:00 pm

Once upon a time, salmon and steelhead swam over a thousand miles upriver to the headwaters of the mighty Columbia River, at the foot of the Rockies in British Columbia.

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Seattle Symphony Media
9:33 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Seattle Symphony Launches New Venture To Release Own Recordings

The Seattle Symphony performs at Benaroya Hall.
Flickr Photo/kmaschke (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Seattle Symphony is joining the ranks of other major orchestras across the country with the creation of an in-house production company called Seattle Symphony Media.

The venture launches with the release of three new recordings, one of which was made during a live performance.

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Education Funding
7:45 am
Wed March 19, 2014

District Rescinds Planned Staffing Cuts At Seattle Schools

Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle Public Schools has rescinded staffing cuts it planned to make at schools across the district.

Superintendent Jose Banda said after analyzing the supplemental budget the Legislature passed last week, the district won’t need to reduce the hours of many secretaries, counselors and other employees.

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Animal Rights
5:04 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Lawsuits Charge 'Ag-Gag' Laws Violate Free Speech

The group Mercy for Animals released video in 2012 of workers at Bettencourt Dairy in Idaho abusing cows. The incident led Idaho lawmakers to outlaw surreptitious video at farms.
Mercy for Animals

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:47 pm

A lawsuit led by the ACLU is challenging Idaho's brand new, so-called “ag-gag” law aimed at stopping undercover animal rights activists from making videos of abuse at farms and slaughter houses.

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EarthFix Reports
5:04 am
Wed March 19, 2014

How Industry Specs And A Federal Loophole Allow Railroads To Avoid Response Planning Oversight

Unlike marine vessels, pipelines and terminal facilities, railroads are not required to file response plans for trains of tanker cars.
EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

Neither states nor the federal government have oversight over how railroads plan for responding to spills from trains carrying crude oil, meaning environmental regulators cannot identify gaps in the plans or verify a railroad’s abilities to carry them out.

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Transportation
5:03 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Washington State Ferries Chief To Resign

David Moseley, the head of Washington State Ferries, with Washington Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond.
WSDOT Flickr

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:07 pm

David Moseley, the head of Washington State Ferries, announced Tuesday that he will step down on April 15 after six years on the job.

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Rideshare Services
9:15 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Seattle City Council Legalizes Rideshares, But Puts Cap On Cars

Drivers and supporters of app-based rideshare service UberX pack Seattle City Council chambers.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

You may see fewer cars with pink mustaches on the road in the coming months.

Seattle’s City Council yesterday gave final approval to a plan that would limit the number of cars that rideshare companies like Lyft, UberX and Sidecar can operate.

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River Ports
9:08 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Oregon Says Coal Export Project Will Need To Lease More Land

A project to transfer coal from trains to Columbia River barges and eventually to ocean-going ships will require additional permits, Oregon regulators recently decided.
Katie Campbell

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 2:55 pm

Developers of the Morrow Pacific coal export project on the Columbia River already have land leases with the Port of St. Helens and the Port of Morrow.

But according to the Oregon Department of State Lands, they're going to need a couple more.

In Oregon, the state owns all the land submerged in water -– including riverbeds.

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No Votes
9:08 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Washington Legislature Fails To Pass Any Oil Train Legislation

Increased oil train traffic had put public pressure on Washington lawmakers to act, but none of this session's oil-train bills passed before the Legislature adjourned Friday.
flickr/Russ Allison Loar https://www.flickr.com/photos/11072040@N08/6184231577/in/photolist-aqtNAn-9d8NnY-dMMvL1-9bXnje-fa6tG7-cCoWk1-cCp1fU-cCp3yQ-cCoSAq-cCoYf1-cCoUqj-cCoP3Q-cCoR5b-cCoLWY-cCoJUo-cCoD3Q-cCoGSL-foFREg-eQovqh-

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 8:00 pm

SEATTLE -- More oil is moving through Washington state from the Bakken oil fields, putting public pressure on elected officials to pass laws protecting public health and the environment.

Bakken oil from North Dakota and Montana has proven extremely flammable, causing several explosions in North America, including one that killed 47 people in Quebec last July.

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Nuclear Waste Cleanup
9:05 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Energy Secretary Meets With Inslee On Hanford

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee met with Department of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz on Monday.
Office of the Governor

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 2:51 pm

Washington Governor Jay Inslee says the U.S. Department of Energy is failing to provide him a “comprehensive” Hanford clean-up plan.

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Chopper Crash
8:22 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Fatal News Helicopter Crash At Seattle Center, Injured Man Improving

Officials on the scene of the crash.
KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

KUOW reporter Patricia Murphy speaks with several voices of the day; including NTSB investigator Dennis Hogenson, witness Daniel Gonzalez, who ran to the scene to aid the survivors, Corwin Haeck from KOMO News Radio, and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray.

Steve Scher talks with KUOW reporter Patricia Murphy about the latest update on Tuesday's helicopter crash.

KUOW's Bill Radke interviews Mike Thielen, helicopter pilot and president of Glacier Aviation, Inc. in Olympia.

An investigation is underway as the National Transportation Safety Board tries to determine what caused the news helicopter to crash near the Space Needle on Tuesday morning, killing two people and injuring one.

NTSB has released a preliminary report on the crash.. The full report will take about a year to complete according to NTSB estimates.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray said that the city will also be reviewing rules of helicopter pads in the city.

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Fish Populations
7:08 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Judge Reduces Hatchery Releases On Sandy River

A federal judge has ruled an Oregon state fish hatchery must limit the number of hatchery-bred fish it releases. The goal is to protect wild salmon and steelhead stocks, which could interbreed with the hatchery fish.
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 2:18 pm

A new court decision reduces the number of hatchery fish releases into Oregon's Sandy River this year.

The Sandy River Hatchery will be allowed to release 200,000 coho salmon this year. That's less than the 300,000 coho hatchery managers were planning to release.

Liz Hamilton, executive director of the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association, said in a statement that the reduction won't harm sport fishers.

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Western Sanctions
4:22 am
Tue March 18, 2014

West Is Ruled 'By The Gun,' Putin Says As He Annexes Crimea

Russian President Vladimir Putin.
Mikhail Klimentyev/RIA Novosti/Kremlin pool EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:21 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': Ellen Barry, Moscow correspondent for 'The New York Times,' talks with NPR's Renee Montagne
We updated this post as Russian President Vladimir Putin spoke and other leaders reacted.

Wasting no time and showing no sign that he's concerned about Western objections or economic sanctions, Russian President Vladimir Putin annexed Crimea on Tuesday.

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Independence Referendum
2:24 am
Tue March 18, 2014

After 300 Years Of Marriage, Scotland Contemplates U.K. Divorce

Pro-independence campaigners attend a rally In Edinburgh, Scotland, in September.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:22 am

Scotland has been part of the United Kingdom for more than 300 years. This fall, that could change. In mid-September, a referendum on independence will determine whether Scotland breaks off from England, Northern Ireland and Wales to become a sovereign nation.

Scotland's largest city, Glasgow, is ground zero in this debate. The East End of this city is poor and run down, with some of the worst health figures in Europe. Men here are expected to live into only their mid-50s, some 30 years less than in wealthy areas.

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