News

Chickasaw
7:43 am
Wed January 8, 2014

What Happens When A Language's Last Monolingual Speaker Dies?

A portrait of Emily Johnson Dickerson by artist Mike Larsen.
Courtesy of the Chickasaw Nation

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 12:47 pm

Emily Johnson Dickerson died at her home in Ada, Okla., last week. She was the last person alive who spoke only the Chickasaw language.

"This is a sad day for all Chickasaw people because we have lost a cherished member of our Chickasaw family and an unequaled source of knowledge about our language and culture," Chickasaw Nation Gov. Bill Anoatubby said in a news release. The Chickasaw Nation has about 55,000 members and is based in the southern part of central Oklahoma.

Read more
Guns
7:43 am
Wed January 8, 2014

Despite Calls To Arm Teachers, Most Schools Opt For Other Measures

A new controlled entry system in the Coeur d'Alene schools requires visitors to speak to the front office over video before coming in.
Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 10:07 am

Parents and students across the Northwest are seeing many new security measures as a result of the Sandy Hook shooting in 2012.

Read more
Coal Terminal
7:39 am
Wed January 8, 2014

Wall Street Giant Backs Away From Washington Coal Export Project

Goldman Sachs has parted ways with a proposal to export 48 million tons of Wyoming Coals through a terminal near Bellingham, Wash.
Katie Campbell

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 4:35 pm

A multinational banking giant is backing away from a proposal to build the West Coast’s biggest coal export project near Bellingham, Washington.

New York-based Goldman Sachs has sold its stock back to the companies proposing to build the Gateway Pacific Terminal. If built it would transfer 48 million tons of Wyoming coal each year from trains to ocean-going vessels bound for Asia.

Read more
Labor
4:39 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Airport Workers To Port: 'It's Like Living Paycheck To Paycheck'

Mohammad Kadhim, a baggage handler at Sea-Tac Airport, appeals to Port of Seattle Commissioners for higher wages.
Liz Jones KUOW

Port of Seattle Commissioners said Tuesday they will consider higher wages for some airport workers, despite last week's court ruling that the Port is exempt from a new ordinance in SeaTac. That law would require a $15 hourly minimum wage for airport-related workers.

Read more
EarthFix Reports
1:07 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Washington Officials Say Shellfish Is Safe For China To Import

Credit Flickr Photo/USDAgov

Washington state officials said Tuesday they found lower contamination levels when they tested geoduck clams than those alleged by China when it said geoduck imported from Puget Sound had high levels of arsenic.

Read more
Fossil Replication
10:20 am
Tue January 7, 2014

How A 3-D Printer Is Helping Preserve A Saber-Tooth Salmon

A saber-toothed salmon, as depicted by artist Ray Troll. The mural is part of the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History.
University of Oregon

For years, museum conservators and paleontologists have yearned for a way to duplicate fragile fossils without damaging them. Now scientists with the University of Oregon say they have found a way to do just that, with the help of a relatively inexpensive 3-D printer.

Read more
Books And Guns
10:02 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Why Seattle Public Library Surrendered Its Gun Ban

Seattle Public Library lifted its gun ban in November after a patron complained that the library rule was breaking the law.
Credit Flickr Photo/Frank Fujimoto

When Seattle Public Library lifted its ban on guns in early November, officials there said they had done so because patrons had complained.  

Internal library emails reveal that there was just one patron complaint in several years – a man with a Yahoo email account who didn’t identify himself as either a patron or Seattle resident.

Read more
Sochi Olympics
9:37 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Cross Country Ski Duo Bring Sibling Power To Winter Olympics

U.S. Ski Team teammates and siblings Sadie and Erik Bjornsen.
Robert Whitney

Originally published on Wed January 15, 2014 4:06 pm

Athletes headed to next month's Winter Olympics in Russia can be expected to leverage any advantage that nature or nurture provides: Experience, a bigger body, or a higher tolerance for pain.

Read more
2014 Ballot
9:37 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Washington Initiative Promoter Files Measure To Resurrect Anti-Tax Rule

Initiative promoter Tim Eyman has a plan to resurrect the two-thirds vote requirement for tax increases in Washington
Austin Jenkins Northwest News Network

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 3:06 pm

Washington initiative promoter Tim Eyman kicked off the New Year with a new ballot proposal.

Read more
Liquor Privatization
9:37 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Northwest Craft Distilleries Hung-over After Washington Liquor Privatization

Mikel, a distiller at Dry Fly Distilling in Spokane, checks quality levels during the process.
Dry Fly Distilling

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 5:22 pm

A Hood River distillery has the top selling brand of liquor according to sales numbers released by the state of Oregon. But other craft distillers say those hot numbers don’t reflect their experience.

Read more
'Mass Movement'
7:44 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Socialist Kshama Sawant Delivers Blistering Speech At Inauguration

Newly-elected Socialist City Councilmember Kshama Sawant celebrates her inauguration with a raised fist. She was sworn in by Nicole Grant of the Washington State Labor Council.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Inauguration in Seattle has usually been a low-key affair. But not this year.

Hundreds packed the lobby of Seattle City Hall on Monday. Some came to see Ed Murray, the city’s first openly gay mayor, take the oath of office. But many more came to catch a glimpse of Kshama Sawant, Seattle’s first Socialist City Council member who has attracted international attention.

Read more
Secrets And Lies
11:57 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

The Secret Burglary That Exposed J. Edgar Hoover's FBI

FBI director J. Edgar Hoover is seen in his Washington office, May 20, 1963. The 1971 burglary of one of the bureau's offices revealed the agency's domestic surveillance program.
William J. Smith AP

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 11:23 am

More than 40 years ago, on the evening of March 8, 1971, a group of burglars carried out an audacious plan. They pried open the door of an FBI office in Pennsylvania and stole files about the bureau's surveillance of anti-war groups and civil rights organizations.

Hundreds of agents tried to identify the culprits, but the crime went unsolved. Until now.

Read more
Workplace Safety
4:26 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Year After Cell Tower Climber Fell, Question Remains: Who To Blame?

Mike Rongey, 32, fell to his death last year because the cell phone tower he was climbing was unsafe.
Credit Courtesy of Jon Rogney

Last January, Mike Rongey, a seasoned climber, was assigned to climb a cell phone tower in Mount Vernon, Wash., to replace electronics that are part of the Clearwire wireless network.

Read more
Education Reform
1:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Public Hearings On Charter School Proposals Begin Today

The Washington State Charter School Commission will host nine public forums around the state this month regarding the 19 charter school proposals it is considering. The first one is  Monday afternoon in Spokane.

Each forum will focus on up to three proposals, and begin with a presentation from the charter applicants.

Read more
EarthFix Reports
9:15 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Oregon Bill Would Limit Household Pesticide Use To Protect Bees

Lori Vollmer, owner of Garden Fever nursery in Portland, removed pesticides containing neonicotinoid chemicals from her store shelves after an estimated 50,000 bumblebees were killed in Wilsonville.
Cassandra Profita

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 1:30 pm

An Oregon lawmaker is looking to restrict household use of four common pesticides that pose risks to bees.

Rep. Jeff Reardon, D-Portland, says given the toxicity of certain pesticides and their track record for killing bees, untrained home gardeners shouldn't be allowed to use them.

Read more

Pages