News

Stalled Investment
10:07 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Minimum Wage Limbo Keeps Small Business Owners Up At Night

Jody Hall, owner of Cupcake Royale, was an early supporter of the mayor's plan to raise the minimum wage to $15. Now she is having serious second thoughts.
Credit KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

As the Seattle City Council continues to debate a plan to phase in a $15 minimum wage, and as minimum wage advocates gather signatures to put an even stronger measure on the November ballot, businesses in the city are finding themselves in an uncomfortable position: in limbo.

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Summer Forecast
9:35 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Long, Warm Summer On Tap According To Weather Service Outlook

National Weather Service is forecasting a strong probability of above-normal temperatures in June, July and August for most of the Northwest.

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 4:28 pm

The supercomputers at the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center have crunched long-term trends to produce an outlook for June, July and August. For most of the Northwest, the forecast gives a strong probability of above-normal temperatures.

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Immigrant And Refugee Affairs
9:24 am
Thu May 22, 2014

Seattle Office Wants To Go Beyond ‘Same Old Voices’ To Address Immigrant Needs

Uriel Ruelas, originally from Mexico City, has lived in Seattle for 15 years. He says immigrants should have the same access to city services as everyone else.
Credit KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

In October 2012, Seattle’s local government expanded in a way typically only seen in bigger cities. Former mayor Mike McGinn created the Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs, or OIRA, in an effort to give more voice to the area’s booming immigrant population. Nearly 20 percent of Seattle’s residents are born outside of the U.S., according to recent census figures.

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Seattle's Past
4:32 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Matt Smith's Last Year With The Nuns

Matt Smith in "My Last Year With The Nuns"
Credit John Jeffcoat, courtesy Matt Smith

Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood is hipster central these days: the place to go for the latest in music clubs, trendy restaurants and street style.

That wasn't always the case.

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Sakura Celebration
11:06 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Japan Gifts UW With 18 Cherry Trees

Members of Seattle Kokon Taiko perform at a dedication ceremony for 18 new cherry trees given to the University of Washington from Japan.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

One of the first signs of spring is when the cherry trees bloom at the University of Washington. The iconic trees on the quad have become a symbol of the University’s ties to Japan. Yesterday, the University celebrated a gift from Japan — 18 new cherry trees to add to the campus.

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EarthFix Reports
7:49 am
Wed May 21, 2014

SolarWorld Among Victims of Alleged Chinese Hacking

Entrance to SolarWorld in Hillsboro, Oregon. The company is among victims in a cyberspying campaign the U.S. Department of Justice say Chinese officials used to steal trade secrets.
Oregon Department of Transportation

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 3:28 pm

SolarWorld, a solar panel manufacturer with its U.S. operation in Hillsboro, Oregon, is among the companies listed as victims in an alleged cyberspying campaign carried out by the Chinese government.

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EarthFix Reports
7:49 am
Wed May 21, 2014

A Wild and Scenic Underground River In Southern Oregon?

The River Styx could become the nation's first underground Wild and Scenic river with a proposed expansion of the Oregon Caves National Monument.
National Park Service

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 2:14 pm

A proposed expansion of Oregon Caves National Monument would make the River Styx the nation’s first underground river to receive Wild and Scenic status.

The River Styx flows through the main cave system of the national monument in Southern Oregon. The water drains into the Illinois River before joining the Rogue River.

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EarthFix Reports
7:49 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Yakama Nation Protests Coal Export Terminal

Yakama Nation fishers and tribal leaders hopped on boats to the fishing site. As a protest, they dropped a net right next to the proposed Morrow Pacific coal export facility.
Courtney Flatt

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 5:44 pm

BOARDMAN, Ore. -- Yakama Nation tribal members took to the Columbia River Tuesday to protest a proposed coal export facility in eastern Oregon. The tribe says the export facility would cut fishers off from treaty-protected fishing sites along the river.

More than 70 people held signs and waved flags on the banks of the Columbia River, just downstream from the proposed Morrow Pacific coal export terminal.

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Washington Supreme Court
7:49 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Inslee's Judicial Appointees Virtually Unopposed On Ballot

Washington Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu takes the oath in the state’s Temple of Justice.

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 10:48 pm

The Washington Supreme Court has its first openly-gay, Asian-American, Latina justice. Former King County Superior Court Judge Mary Yu was sworn-in Tuesday.

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Overloaded Quincy Hospital
7:49 am
Wed May 21, 2014

Rural Hospital Frustrated With Role As Sasquatch Festival's Emergency Room

Dr. Fernando Dietsch is the chief medical officer and E.R. director at Quincy Valley Medical Center.
Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 8:31 am

Over three days, the annual pilgrimage of 25,000 rollicking concertgoers to the Sasquatch Music Festival turns central Washington's picturesque Gorge Amphitheater along the Columbia River into the largest city in Grant County.

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Sakura
3:25 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Japanese Cherry Trees Harken Back To Darker Times At UW

One of the 30 young cherry trees the University of Washington dedicated in a ceremony on Tuesday.
Credit KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

In a ceremony on Tuesday morning, the University of Washington dedicated more than 30 young cherry trees, gifts from Japan.

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10th Anniversary
2:48 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

The Library Seattle Grew To Love, Or At Least Get Used To

Managing architect Joshua Prince-Ramus and KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on the fourth level where the meeting rooms are. The walls, ceiling and floors are painted four different shades of red, hence the floor’s nickname: the womb.
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

Superstar architect Rem Koolhaas and his Rotterdam-based firm OMA almost didn't build Seattle's iconic downtown library building.

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Hidden Kitchens
10:45 am
Tue May 20, 2014

How Russia's Shared Kitchens Helped Shape Soviet Politics

Anna Matveevna came to this communal apartment in St. Petersburg in 1931, when she was 8 years old.
Courtesy of European University, St. Petersburg, Russia,Colgate University and Cornell University

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 3:44 pm

In the decades following the 1917 Russian Revolution, most people in Moscow lived in communal apartments; seven or more families crammed together where there had been one, sharing one kitchen and one bathroom. They were crowded; stove space and food were limited. Clotheslines were strewn across the kitchen, the laundry of one family dripping into the omelet of another.

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Caricatures
9:16 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Macklemore Plays Dress-Up And Lands In Hot Water

A costumed Macklemore performed at the opening night of an exhibition at Seattle's EMP Museum. His costume choice has become A Thing.
Suzi Pratt FilmMagic

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:57 pm

Post Updated 1:45 a.m. ET Tuesday:

Macklemore posted an apology on his website late Monday. He said he picked out items that he could use to disguise himself so he could move freely around an event. "I wasn't attempting to mimic any culture, nor resemble one. A 'Jewish stereotype' never crossed my mind," his post reads.

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EarthFix Reports
10:17 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Arrests Highlight Threat To Ancient Redwoods

File photo of a redwood burl. Burl thieves have been striking in Northern California's forests recently.
aefitzhugh / Flickr

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 7:43 am

Two northern California men have been charged with damaging old growth trees in the Redwood National and State Forest. The arrests are the first in response to a recent increase in illegal poaching of redwood burl.

You’ve probably seen countertops or furniture made from redwood burl. The richly colored, swirling grain is prized for its beauty and can fetch a hefty price. A coffee table or bar top can sell for thousands. That kind of money — combined with a largely unregulated market for the wood — has proved irresistible to poachers in the northern California forests.

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