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There's money in a state highway budget that passed the Washington House Thursday to study a one-of-a-kind possible toll bridge fashioned out of retired Navy aircraft carriers.

A special committee in the Idaho legislature assigned to find a compromise deal on roads funding ended the day Thursday with plenty of frustration but, still no deal.

Washington drivers might get to drive 75 on some rural highways.

Friday marks two months since Antonio Zambrano-Montes was shot by police in Pasco, Washington after he was reportedly throwing rocks in a crowded intersection.

Washington State Auditor Troy Kelley is choosing to remain mostly silent about his legal troubles.

Ivan Doig, the award-winning writer, most often wrote about his home state of Montana. He was 75 when he died on Thursday.
University of Washington Photo/Anil Kapahi

Award winning writer Ivan Doig died Thursday at his Seattle home. He was 75.

Doig was one of the most respected writers of the American West and often wrote about his native state of Montana.

He wrote 16 books, including the so-called McCaskill trilogy, three novels about a fictional Montana family covering the first 100 years of state history.

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KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It’s the day before state testing, and the Dimpsey and Rasche kids gather for a playdate in Kirkland.

Pearl, a third-grader at Peter Kirk Elementary, won’t take the test. “If people didn’t know it was such a big test then I think they would actually do a better job,” she says.

Meri Putnam, age 11. She was adopted from Ethiopia at age 5.
Courtesy of the Ryan-Putnam family

It was a long trip and many things were different. But I enjoyed it. I was young so I wasn’t that close to many people. But it was hard to let go of my grandma, who took care of me when my mom wasn’t there.   

Then I met my adoptive parents.  

I knew they were going to be my parents the second I saw them, the way they smiled at me. They were crying but trying to act calm.

Moodette Ka'apana in a photograph taken at her 60th birthday celebration.
Courtesy of KaLehua Ka'apana

To people who knew Moodette Ka’apana, she was Aunty Moody.

“There’s a saying in the Hawaii community: ‘Huiiii, Aunty! How you?’” said Stephen Gomes, a friend.

“Everybody knew Aunty,” Gomes said, “they knew Aunty Moody.”

Activists Urge Wyden To Stop 'Fast Track' Bill

Apr 9, 2015

Labor and environmental advocates are urging Sen. Ron Wyden to oppose a bill that would "fast track" the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade deal.

Activists rallied outside Wyden’s Portland office Wednesday afternoon. They were calling for the senator to step away from a "fast track" bill that could limit lawmakers’ ability to amend later trade agreements.

The TPP trade deal has been a target for labor and environmental groups. In part, because many of the details have been kept confidential from the public.

Mt. Hood Snowpack At Record Low Ahead Of Final Measurement Thursday

Apr 9, 2015

This is the time of year when mountain snowpacks are usually at their deepest. But as of last week, three quarters of Oregon’s long-term snow monitoring sites had the lowest snowpack levels on record. On Mt. Hood, the final snow survey of the season will be conducted Thursday.

Julie Koeberle is a Snow Hydrologist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service. She sat down with OPB’s Kate Davidson to talk about the year’s snowpack and what lies ahead.

Oregon lawmakers decided Wednesday to make it less likely for people who win big at the Oregon Lottery to keep getting public assistance.

The ping-pong of transportation plans between the Idaho House and Senate promises to make this a long week at the Capitol.

Cheu Chang, right, at the Indochinese Farm Project in Woodinville in the mid-80s.
Courtesy of WSU Extension/Sharon Coleman

If you’ve bought one of those big flower bouquets at Seattle’s Pike Place Market, there’s a good chance a Hmong farmer sold it to you.

In this courtroom sketch, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, center, is depicted between defense attorneys Miriam Conrad, left, and Judy Clarke, right, during his federal death penalty trial, Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with conspiring with hi
AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins

BOSTON (AP) -- Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was convicted Wednesday in the Boston Marathon bombing by a federal jury that now must decide whether the 21-year-old former college student should be executed.

Tsarnaev kept his hands folded in front of him and looked down at the defense table as listened to the verdict, reached after a day and a half of deliberations. He was found guilty on charges that included conspiracy and use of a weapon of mass destruction - offenses punishable by death.

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