News

Labor
12:53 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Seattle Steps Closer To Setting Highest Minimum Wage In U.S.

Supporters of Mayor Murray's proposed $15 minimum wage packed a committee as council members discuss amendments to the plan. In the end, the committee unanimously passed the proposal.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

It was standing room only at Seattle’s city hall on Thursday, as councilmembers made changes to a minimum wage proposal. This signals that Seattle is poised to be the first city to pass a $15 minimum wage, the highest in the country.

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Student Privacy
9:57 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Proposed Sale Of Seattle Student Data Site Worries Officials

Student data is increasingly being stored on cloud computing services, raising new security and privacy concerns.
Kjetil Korslien Flickr

The potential bankruptcy sale of a company that stores online student data – including personally identifiable information for about 20,000 Seattle middle and high school students – has concerned the Federal Trade Commission and Seattle Public Schools. 

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This Not Just In
9:44 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Remembering Seattle's Historic NBA Moment 35 Years Ago

Seattle Sonics fan with sign, circa 1980, the year after the team won the NBA championship.
Flickr Photo/King County (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Oklahoma City Thunder are playing the San Antonio Spurs in the NBA conference finals Saturday. They currently trail the spurs two games to three after a tough defeat Thursday night.

The fact the Thunder are even in the finals might be a bitter pill for some Supersonic fans, as they remember the time when the Sonics were in the national spotlight, 35 years ago this Sunday.

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Crime & Courts
8:13 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Fighting Public Welfare Fraud In Washington Keeps State Investigators Busy

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 4:38 pm

Fraud investigators in Washington state say they expect to announce a major case of public welfare theft next month.

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Sports
4:48 am
Fri May 30, 2014

NBA Says LA Clippers Sale 'Resolved,' But Sterling Vows To Sue

Los Angeles Clippers co-owner Shelly Sterling (left) has announced a "binding contract" to sell the team to former Microsoft executive Steve Ballmer for $2 billion. Any sale of the team would require the NBA's approval before it is made official.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 4:49 pm

Shelly Sterling says her family's trust has reached a deal to sell the Los Angeles Clippers to former Microsoft executive Steve Ballmer for $2 billion. The wife of embattled Clippers owner Donald Sterling issued a news release announcing a "binding contract" Thursday night.

"I am delighted that we are selling the team to Steve, who will be a terrific owner," Shelly Sterling said in the news release. "We have worked for 33 years to build the Clippers into a premiere NBA franchise. I am confident that Steve will take the team to new levels of success."

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StoryCorps
12:04 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Once Forbidden, Books Become A Lifeline For A Young Migrant Worker

On a visit to StoryCorps, Storm Reyes told her son, Jeremy Hagquist, about growing up as a farm laborer. Reyes eventually went to night school and worked in a library for more than 30 years.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 10:33 am

In the late 1950s, when she was just 8 years old, Storm Reyes began picking fruit as a full-time farm laborer for less than $1 per hour. Storm and her family moved often, living in Native American migrant worker camps without electricity or running water.

With all that moving around, she wasn't allowed to have books growing up, Storm tells her son, Jeremy Hagquist, on a visit to StoryCorps in Tacoma, Wash.

"Books are heavy, and when you're moving a lot you have to keep things just as minimal as possible," she says.

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EarthFix Reports
3:32 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Oso Highlights A Policy Challenge: Development Pressure Vs. Landslide Risk

Barbara Ingram stands in front of the site of a proposed development in her neighborhood. Snohomish County denied the permit for the development due to "slope stability and drainage issues" but the developer has reapplied.
KUOW Photo/Ashley Ahearn

Barbara Ingram furrows her brow as she peers into a patch of woods up the road from her house. Developers have had their eyes on this place, too.

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Mental Illness
3:10 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Washington ACLU Urges High Court To End Psychiatric Boarding

Advocates for the mentally ill filed a friend of the court brief with the Washington State Supreme Court urging the justices to uphold a Pierce County judge's ruling. The state's high court will hear arguments in the case next month. Last year, Pierce County Superior Court Judge Kathryn Nelsons ruled that boarding the mentally ill was illegal. 

Drivers Ed
7:54 am
Thu May 29, 2014

Stopped By A Trooper? Don't Reach For Your Registration

File photo of a new Washington State Patrol cruiser

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 4:16 pm

With the summer driving season fast approaching, the Washington State Patrol is reminding drivers what to do and not do if you’re stopped.

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EarthFix Reports
3:54 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

One County’s Controversial Move To Protect Homeowners From Landslide Risk

John Thompson, a geologist and senior planner with Whatcom County, surveys the Jim Creek and Bald Mountain landslides along Canyon Creek. The slides have blocked the creek repeatedly, causing flooding that has destroyed homes downstream.
Ashley Ahearn

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 11:00 pm

This is the first part of a two-part series on managing landslide risk. Read the second part of the serieshere.

GLACIER SPRINGS, Wash. — Canyon Creek comes plunging fast and steep down the Cascade Mountains near Mount Baker.

Since the March 22 Oso landslide killed 42 people, county governments in the Northwest have been thinking more about how to plan for and mitigate the risk of landslides.

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Gender Wage Gap
2:18 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Seattle Women Earn Less Than Men. The City Wants To Change That

Seattle Councilwoman Jean Godden said she was shocked to learn that the city does not provide its employees with paid time off to care for a new child.
Credit Jean Godden's Facebook page

City of Seattle employees who are women earn on average 9.5 percent less than men.

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EarthFix Reports
7:55 am
Wed May 28, 2014

New Rules Make It Easier To Log Damaged Federal Forestland

A 330,000-acre area of Oregon's Fremont-Winema National Forest has been infested by bark beetles. It's one of the areas now designated for restoration logging under new rules.
Courtesy of Fremont-Winema National Forest

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 1:16 pm

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has eased rules for logging millions of acres of Northwest forestland considered to be at risk of catastrophic fire.

These are forests where insects and disease have damaged trees and other vegetation, creating fuel for wildfires. These forestlands now have a special designation that allows a streamlined process for logging on larger tracts.

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Government
7:54 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Pacific Tower Expected To Fill With Tenants; Long-Term Funding An Issue

File photo of Pacific Tower, a 14-story former public hospital that also once served as the headquarters of Amazon.com.

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 6:13 pm

After a slow start, the state of Washington says it’s on track to fill the former headquarters of Amazon.com with tenants. But long-term costs remain a concern.

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Baby Lambs
7:54 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Pneumonia Outbreaks Hitting Northwest’s Wild Bighorn Sheep

File photo of Bighorn sheep in Glacier National Park, Montana.

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 5:54 pm

Bighorn sheep in the Northwest have their lambs in early spring. About now, those babies start playing together in the mountains – a sort of lamb daycare.

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The Birds
7:53 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Environmentalists See Chance To Quash Idaho Raven-Killing Experiment

File photo of a common raven

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 7:18 am

A plan to poison 3,500 ravens in Idaho won’t proceed this year as state wildlife managers had hoped. The idea is to stop the ravens from eating the eggs of the imperilled sage grouse.

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