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One of the largest independent expenditures in Washington state elections this year has come in the race for schools chief. 


Five years ago this week, a wolf known as OR-7 began a long journey across Oregon. He traveled some 1,200 miles, including a stint in northern California, before settling in southern Oregon.

Some biologists thought OR-7 would forever remain a wandering bachelor and never pair up. But he found a mate in 2014, and the two have produced pups for the past three years in a row.

Michelle Dennehy with Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife says much has changed for wolves since OR-7 was born in 2009 in eastern Oregon.

This is the second story in a three-part series. Read part one and part three.

DRY RIVER CANYON, Ore. — In the middle of the night, at the edge of a Central Oregon canyon, a man in a jumpsuit sent mating calls into the darkness.

National Archives, Seattle collection

Seattle traffic, as you know, has become monstrous.

Delays on regional freeways doubled between 2010 and 2015, according to the Puget Sound Regional Council. 

Why have our highways failed us so? A 50-year-old document provides one answer. 

Hossein Khorram (left) at a Republican viewing party of a presidential debate in Bellevue, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Hebah Fisher

There are about 20,000 self-identified Muslims in Washington state – and some are voting for Trump. 


No-GMO food label
AP Photo/Paul Sakuma

Washington state officials are calling it the largest campaign-finance penalty in U.S. history.

A Thurston County Superior Court judge on Wednesday ordered the Grocery Manufacturers Association to pay an $18 million fine for deliberately hiding its donors.

A new state audit says the Oregon agency that monitors natural hazards has engaged in some questionable fiscal practices. The report says the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries is also taking steps to correct the problem.

A vast pool of warmer-than-normal ocean water off of the West Coast continues to mess with our weather and sea life. It's nicknamed "The Blob.”

First they called for her resignation. Now the Republican leaders of the Washington House and Senate are calling for the suspension of the director of the state’s campaign finance watchdog.

To Chinese-American voters: We hear you!

Nov 2, 2016

A KUOW story about Chinese-Americans' views on the presidential race has received a considerable response from the Chinese-American community. The original headline, “A Trump win would help China. That is why this banner flew over Seattle,” was changed to “Why some Chinese-Americans support Trump (it has nothing to do with China)” to more accurately convey the focus of the story.

More than a quarter of the lands in Washington state and more than half of Oregon’s acreage are owned by the U.S. government. It’s land that makes up national parks, forests, monuments, and wildlife refuges.

So what would it mean if the federal government did what many have been asking for, and transferred those lands to states?

This banner flew over Seattle on Oct. 28. It reads, WA Chinese for Trump.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Editor’s note, 11/3/16: This story has been updated with additional reporting. KUOW failed to include the voices of Chinese-Americans in the original article. We apologize for this oversight.

You might not expect Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to be popular in China or among Chinese-Americans in the U.S. given his many comments about China draining away American money and jobs. And yet on Friday, an airplane flew over Seattle with the banner, “Washington Chinese Americans for Trump.” 

The King County ballot has a stub at the top you must tear off.
KUOW Photo/Jim Gates

Voting is hard. Your ballot is packed with decisions – some tougher than others. You have to parse the wonk, find the right-colored pen and sweat over whether you actually need a postage stamp.

For King and Snohomish county voters, there’s one more step: You’re asked to tear a stub off the top of your ballot before placing it in the security envelope. Or else … what?

This is the first story in a three-part series. Read part one and part two.

For wildlife in Oregon, the best way to stay alive is to make sure someone wants to kill you.

Durell Green is voting for the first time in 2016. 'I feel like a citizen again, like my rights are almost all the way restored.'
KUOW Photos/Gil Aegerter

You know how you get your ballot in the mail, and you throw it in with the pile of fall catalogs and bills? And you say to yourself: “Oh, yeah, voting. Yeah. Gotta get to that.”

Well, that's not what it's like for former prisoners like Susan Mason taking advantage of a change in state law. She anticipated her ballot this year.


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