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How well do you know the Seattle City Council district you live in? In 2013, Seattle voted to split the city into seven districts to elect council members with two more members elected at-large. This year will be the first election under that system.

To help navigate the new voting framework, we gathered demographic and other information on the new districts from Seattle's Department of Planning and Development and surveyed our listeners about their thoughts as they prepare to choose the new City Council.

The Corner Creek Fire has burned 26,000 acres south of Dayville, Oregon.

Idaho Governor Butch Otter issued a disaster declaration Monday for two north Idaho counties dealing with a fast-growing wildfire.

The first four providers of the city's new subsidized preschool program were unveiled Monday, and they're primarily in South Seattle.

Beginning this fall, the first Seattle Preschool Program sites will offer free or sliding-scale tuition to about 230 children who are 3 or 4 years old.

American fans march fill the street as they march to the final match at BC Place.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

VANCOUVER, B.C. -- The streets of Vancouver were abuzz this weekend as U.S. soccer fans poured into the city to watch the showdown between the U.S. Women’s National Team and Japan in the final of the World Cup.

With the final game just over the border at BC Place, fans from Washington state made their way north.

An investor quietly shows an auctioneer his money at the foreclosure auction that takes place outside the King County courthouse in downtown Seattle every Friday.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The Seattle-area housing market could use an injection of inventory. It’s on a tear right now, fueled by high demand and low supply, and hooked on low-interest rates.

And there is a potential supply of lower-priced homes in the region. Those are the 4,300 foreclosed homes from Everett to Tacoma that are now owned by banks.

Allison Dunmire, a stay-at-home mom in Kirkland, is having a tough time finding a house to buy -- even one they don't like all that much.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

It’s tough to buy a house in Seattle at the moment.

The shortage of houses on the market has widened the gap between those who can plunk down far more than the asking price – often in cash – and those without such means.

Linda Vane from the King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks examines a stand of Scotch broom, a invasive plant that is highly flammable.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Linda Vane stoops down to pull out a handful of weeds at the edge of a gravel road. The weeds are dry and crumble in her hands. The soil beneath them is dry as well.

"I'm nervous this year," said Vane, who assesses wildfire risk in her duties with the forestry program at the King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks.

The window of opportunity to prevent grave ecological damage to our oceans from climate change is closing. That's according to a paper appearing Friday in the journal Science.

To understand Hanford and its nuclear legacy, many newcomers need a “translator” like Liz Mattson.

Duwamish tribal chairwoman Cecile Hansen hold her great-grandson, Maximus Pearson in this photo from May 2013.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A long journey for Seattle’s Duwamish Tribe appeared to have hit a dead end Thursday. The federal government rejected the tribe’s decades-long fight for official recognition -- and many benefits that come with it. KUOW’s Liz Jones reports.

A federal jury in Washington has ruled that railroad company BNSF retaliated against a whistleblower who brought safety concerns to light. This week the court awarded the former employee $1.25 million in damages.

In 2011, BNSF employee Mike Elliott raised safety concerns about the freight and passenger rail line connecting Vancouver, Washington, and Seattle. He said the signal system, which controls traffic on the line, did not function properly and was obscured by overgrown vegetation.

A government whistleblower protection office has authorized an investigation into alleged misuse of federal funds by a Klamath Basin irrigators’ group.

Earlier this spring, two federal biologists filed a whistleblower complaint with the U.S. Office of Special Counsel. They said the Klamath Water and Power Agency used money earmarked for drought-stressed fish to pay for things like office space, travel and employee salaries.

Since 2008, nearly $50 million in federal dollars has been paid to the Klamath organization.

The family of Antonio Zambrano-Montes -- and the Tri-Cities -- are grappling with fresh details of his death.

Idaho law enforcement say they’ve been finding more marijuana in vehicles coming from states with looser pot laws.

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