More from KUOW

Journalism
11:51 am
Wed November 28, 2012

The New Front Page: 21st Century Journalism And What It Means For You

Claudia Rowe
Author's LinkedIn Profile

What happens when the demand for profit by media companies drives news coverage? Seattle reporter Claudia Rowe joins Ross Reynolds to talk about the changing landscape of journalism in 2012. She’s been in journalism for more than 20 years, writing most recently for The New York Times and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

Public Transportation
11:48 am
Wed November 28, 2012

Is Seattle's Mass Transit Massively Bad Or Massively Good?

Has your riding experience truly been easy?
Oran Viriyincy Flickr

Do you have complaints about the RapidRide bus service? Or are you loving the WiFi? Ross Reynolds talks to listeners about the state of their mass transit commute. How’s your bus, train, ferry commute going these days?

Economy
10:00 am
Wed November 28, 2012

Canada, Culture And Commerce: Fiscal-Cliff Notes And "Hitchcock"

Sacha Gervasi's
Credit Courtesy/Fox Searchlight

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton assesses Anthony Hopkins as Alfred Hitchcock. Then, we review the latest economic news with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton.

History
9:00 am
Wed November 28, 2012

More From Jon Meacham On Thomas Jefferson

Credit (Credit/Random House)

Thomas Jefferson was a deeply political man who viciously fought for his beliefs, but he was also flawed. More than simply accepting slavery, Jefferson benefited from it in many ways — though, through the language of the Declaration, he may have set in motion its eventual disintegration. We hear more from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham ("Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power") about how this contradictory president wielded power and influence, and how he shaped America’s evolution.

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Women's Civil Rights
2:00 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

"The Good Girls Revolt:" Lynn Povich On How The Women Of Newsweek Changed The Workplace

Cover of 'The Good Girls Revolt,' by Lynn Povich

The 1960s was a time of economic boom and social strife. Young women poured into the workplace, but the help wanted ads were segregated by gender and the office culture was rife with sexual stereotyping and discrimination.

Author Lynn Povich was one of the lucky ones; she landed a job at Newsweek. It was a top-notch job for a woman at the time, and it was an exciting place. Newsweek was renowned for its cutting-edge coverage of civil rights and the Swinging Sixties. Yet the organization unknowingly sat on a discriminatory powder keg of its very own making.

For women, the job was a dead end. Women researchers sometimes became reporters, but rarely writers, and never editors. Any aspiring female journalist was told, “If you want to be a writer, go somewhere else.” So the women of Newsweek decided to sue their employer.

Lynn Povich talked with the CBC's Jim Brown about what it was like for her and the women of Newsweek to fight for the right to equal treatment in their workplace.

 Other Stories On KUOW Presents:

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Family
12:02 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Not Everybody Says I Love You

Love messages on concrete walls in Vancouver, BC.
Geoffrey Kehrig Flickr

The last time you talked with family you either said "I love you" or you didn't. And you either heard it back, or you didn't. Do you hear "I love you" a lot from family? Do you say it? KUOW's Jeannie Yandel talks to listeners about families that do and don't say those three magic words.

Author Interview
12:00 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Seattle Writer Domingo Martinez On Coming Of Age In A Texas Border Town

Seattle writer Domingo Martinez is the author of "The Boy Kings Of Texas," which was recently nominated for the National Book Award.  It’s about the cultural tensions he experienced growing up in the border town of Brownsville.  

KUOW's David Hyde talks to Martinez about growing up in a border town, his family, why he moved to Seattle, and why he stayed. 

Gardening
10:00 am
Tue November 27, 2012

Greendays Gardening: Preparing For Winter

Winter is coming. Are your trees and plants ready?
Credit Flickr photo/Mark Grapengater

Just a few more weeks until we winter over. Is your garden ready for winter? Marty Wingate and Greg Rabourn join us to answer your questions.  Call us at 206.543.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

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Books
9:00 am
Tue November 27, 2012

Jon Meacham On Thomas Jefferson

Jon Meacham
Credit Courtesy/Gasper Tringale

Many books have been written about Thomas Jefferson. The latest, by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham, seeks in part to rehabilitate Jefferson’s legacy, reinstating him as a consummate politician and an idealist for human liberty, even as he fell short in ending one of America's greatest injustices. How did Jefferson see his role in the evolving American idea? Jon Meacham joins us to talk about "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power."

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Drug Reform
8:00 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Debate: Should Drugs Be Legalized?

Medical marijuana is available in 18 states, and the vote on November 6 legalized the possession of pot in Colorado and Washington. With the highest incarceration rate in the world, and more than $2 trillion dedicated to fighting the "war on drugs," we continue to fill our prisons with drug offenders. Is it worth it? From the series Intelligence Squared U.S., the motion is Legalize Drugs.

Panelists:

Paul Butler, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center

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Literary Giants In Decline
2:00 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

How A Few Indistinct Words Burped Up By A Drunk Tennessee Williams Changed One Man's Life

A quote by Tennessee Williams found at the Southernmost Beach in Key West, Florida.
Flickr Photo/Sam Howzit

The writer Allan Gurganus admired Tennessee Williams. One day, Gurganus heard the famous playwright had read one of his stories and enjoyed it. Full of confidence, Gurganus traveled to New Orleans where some friends had arranged for him to meet Williams. But the drunken, Tabasco-stained man he met taught him a lesson he didn’t expect.

WUNC's Dick Gordon brings us Gurganus' captivating story of a literary giant in decline.

Other Stories On KUOW Presents:

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Psychology
12:00 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Your Surgeon May Be A Psychopath (But Don’t Worry)

The psychopath Hannibal Lecter in the movie "Silence of the Lambs" is ruthless.  But he’s also charming, persuasive and highly intelligent.  Cambridge psychology professor Kevin Dutton says when psychopaths don’t turn violent they can become very successful as CEOs, surgeons, or in other professions. His latest book is "The Wisdom Of Psychopaths."

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Family
10:18 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Andrew Solomon On Parents, Children And Differing Identities

“The apple never falls far from the tree,” the saying goes. But what happens when it does? Our guest today tells the stories of children whose identities are very different from their parents, such as dwarfs who are born to parents of average stature.  How do parents and children navigate these differences?  And what do these children have in common?

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International News
10:00 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Tamim Ansary On Afghanistan's Interrupted History

The US military and its allies are drawing up plans to leave Afghanistan by 2014, but it will be some time before the nation is truly independent. Peace in Afghanistan has been interspersed with foreign invasion for centuries, from the Mongol Empire to today’s war. We talk with writer Tamim Ansary about his new book, “Game Without Rules: The Often Interrupted History of Afghanistan,” and what Afghan independence might look like in the future.

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Arts & Entertainment
9:00 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Conlangs: The Art Of Fake Languages

Constructed languages, or "conlangs," are the made-up tongues that bring the worlds of "Avatar,"  "Lord of the Rings" and "Star Trek" to life. We talk with linguist David J. Peterson, creator of the Dothraki language for HBO's "Game of Thrones," about what goes into creating a language from scratch.

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