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Native Americans
2:04 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Native Americans To Soon Receive Settlement Checks

Elouise Cobell, a member of Montana's Blackfeet Tribe, and four other Native Americans led a class-action land use lawsuit against the U.S. government. Cobell is shown here in 2009 with Interior Secretary Ken Salazar after an announcement on the settlement of the lawsuit. Cobell died last year.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Fri November 30, 2012 4:05 am

Federal officials are working to send out $1,000 checks in the next few weeks to hundreds of thousands of Native Americans. The money stems from a settlement of the Cobell case, a landmark $3.4 billion settlement over mismanagement of federal lands held in trust for Native American people.

The case was brought by Elouise Cobell, a member of Montana's Blackfeet Tribe, and four other Native Americans in 1996.

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Culture
8:00 pm
Thu November 29, 2012

Ignite Seattle's Quest To Enlighten Us, Quickly

Tyler Pruitt at a hands-on workshop during Ignite Seattle 9.
Flickr photo/Randy Stewart

"Enlighten us, but make it quick."

That's the premise of Ignite Seattle, a regular worldwide event where presenters get five minutes and 20 slides to get a point across. Speakers at this month's event touch on a variety of topics, including artistry, forgiveness and the environment. One woman even talks about a fear of public speaking.

Ignite Seattle took place at Town Hall on November 8, 2012. The talk was moderated by The Seattle Times columnist Monica Guzman.

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Childhood Psychology
2:00 pm
Thu November 29, 2012

The Benefits Of Having Imaginary Friends

What did your imaginary friend look like?
Flickr Photo/Vanessa Monfreda

Lots of us had imaginary friends when we were kids. And now a psychologist at the University of Oregon is looking into how having imaginary friends, and creating an imaginary world for them, affects how you relate to real people. We’ll learn about her research. And we’ll meet Maxine, an 8-year old with a whole host of imaginary friends.

Other Stories On KUOW Presents:

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Environment
10:00 am
Thu November 29, 2012

Sierra Club Wants Coal Out Of PSE's Stocking

Puget Sound Energy owns and operates a coal-fired power plant out of Billings, Montana, that the Sierra Club calls "the dirtiest coal plant in the West." The Colstrip Plant meets EPA emission standards and PSE touts its green-energy portfolio, with plans to triple its renewable energy supply by 2020. How does coal fit into that equation? And with coal plants generating 42 percent of America's electricity, how much impact would closing one plant have? We take a look with PSE's Andy Wappler and Anne Hedges of the Montana Environmental Information Center.

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Economy
9:00 am
Thu November 29, 2012

The New Freelance Economy

Freelance work can be stressful and unreliable, but also very freeing.

Up to one-third of working adults in the United States are independent contractors. Do you have what it takes to make it on your own? Freelancers Union founder Sara Horowitz joins us to talk about how independent workers are changing the national job landscape and what you need to know before joining the ranks of the self-employed.

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Celebrity Culture
2:00 pm
Wed November 28, 2012

"Fame Junkies:" Jake Halpern Explores America's Obsession With Celebrity Fame

Cover of "Fame Junkies" by Jake Halpern.

Everywhere you look in American culture it seems there are images of fame and celebrity. When Jake Halpern set out to write his book "Fame Junkies: The Hidden Truths Behind America's Favorite Addiction," he wanted to answer a few questions. Why do countless Americans yearn so desperately to have entertainment-celebrity type fame? Why do others, like celebrity personal assistants, devote their entire lives to servicing these people? And why do millions of others fall into the mindless habit of watching them from afar?

In order to get the answers he sought, Halpern talked with academics, psychologists, magazine editors and teenagers about why more Americans would rather be famous, than not. The CBC's Sook Yin Lee talked with Halpern about what he discovered.

Other Stories On KUOW Presents:

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Journalism
11:51 am
Wed November 28, 2012

The New Front Page: 21st Century Journalism And What It Means For You

Claudia Rowe
Author's LinkedIn Profile

What happens when the demand for profit by media companies drives news coverage? Seattle reporter Claudia Rowe joins Ross Reynolds to talk about the changing landscape of journalism in 2012. She’s been in journalism for more than 20 years, writing most recently for The New York Times and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

Public Transportation
11:48 am
Wed November 28, 2012

Is Seattle's Mass Transit Massively Bad Or Massively Good?

Has your riding experience truly been easy?
Oran Viriyincy Flickr

Do you have complaints about the RapidRide bus service? Or are you loving the WiFi? Ross Reynolds talks to listeners about the state of their mass transit commute. How’s your bus, train, ferry commute going these days?

Economy
10:00 am
Wed November 28, 2012

Canada, Culture And Commerce: Fiscal-Cliff Notes And "Hitchcock"

Sacha Gervasi's
Credit Courtesy/Fox Searchlight

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton assesses Anthony Hopkins as Alfred Hitchcock. Then, we review the latest economic news with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton.

History
9:00 am
Wed November 28, 2012

More From Jon Meacham On Thomas Jefferson

Credit (Credit/Random House)

Thomas Jefferson was a deeply political man who viciously fought for his beliefs, but he was also flawed. More than simply accepting slavery, Jefferson benefited from it in many ways — though, through the language of the Declaration, he may have set in motion its eventual disintegration. We hear more from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham ("Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power") about how this contradictory president wielded power and influence, and how he shaped America’s evolution.

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Women's Civil Rights
2:00 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

"The Good Girls Revolt:" Lynn Povich On How The Women Of Newsweek Changed The Workplace

Cover of 'The Good Girls Revolt,' by Lynn Povich

The 1960s was a time of economic boom and social strife. Young women poured into the workplace, but the help wanted ads were segregated by gender and the office culture was rife with sexual stereotyping and discrimination.

Author Lynn Povich was one of the lucky ones; she landed a job at Newsweek. It was a top-notch job for a woman at the time, and it was an exciting place. Newsweek was renowned for its cutting-edge coverage of civil rights and the Swinging Sixties. Yet the organization unknowingly sat on a discriminatory powder keg of its very own making.

For women, the job was a dead end. Women researchers sometimes became reporters, but rarely writers, and never editors. Any aspiring female journalist was told, “If you want to be a writer, go somewhere else.” So the women of Newsweek decided to sue their employer.

Lynn Povich talked with the CBC's Jim Brown about what it was like for her and the women of Newsweek to fight for the right to equal treatment in their workplace.

 Other Stories On KUOW Presents:

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Family
12:02 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Not Everybody Says I Love You

Love messages on concrete walls in Vancouver, BC.
Geoffrey Kehrig Flickr

The last time you talked with family you either said "I love you" or you didn't. And you either heard it back, or you didn't. Do you hear "I love you" a lot from family? Do you say it? KUOW's Jeannie Yandel talks to listeners about families that do and don't say those three magic words.

Author Interview
12:00 pm
Tue November 27, 2012

Seattle Writer Domingo Martinez On Coming Of Age In A Texas Border Town

Seattle writer Domingo Martinez is the author of "The Boy Kings Of Texas," which was recently nominated for the National Book Award.  It’s about the cultural tensions he experienced growing up in the border town of Brownsville.  

KUOW's David Hyde talks to Martinez about growing up in a border town, his family, why he moved to Seattle, and why he stayed. 

Gardening
10:00 am
Tue November 27, 2012

Greendays Gardening: Preparing For Winter

Winter is coming. Are your trees and plants ready?
Credit Flickr photo/Mark Grapengater

Just a few more weeks until we winter over. Is your garden ready for winter? Marty Wingate and Greg Rabourn join us to answer your questions.  Call us at 206.543.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

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Books
9:00 am
Tue November 27, 2012

Jon Meacham On Thomas Jefferson

Jon Meacham
Credit Courtesy/Gasper Tringale

Many books have been written about Thomas Jefferson. The latest, by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham, seeks in part to rehabilitate Jefferson’s legacy, reinstating him as a consummate politician and an idealist for human liberty, even as he fell short in ending one of America's greatest injustices. How did Jefferson see his role in the evolving American idea? Jon Meacham joins us to talk about "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power."

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