More from KUOW

Housing Market
11:47 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Housing Prices Climb In Seattle, But Have They Climbed All The Way To Recovery?

Zillow Cheif Economist Stan Humphries.
Twitter Profile Photo

Seattle homes are now worth 14.4 percent more than they were a year ago. That’s according to Seattle based real estate firm Zillow, who release monthly reports on the value of homes in Seattle and elsewhere in the region. On the national level, the US has just made it through our 12th straight month of increasing home values. Top Zillow officials say that these numbers are a good indicator that local and national housing markets are showing significant improvements. Ross Reynolds talks with Zillow's Cheif Economist Stan Humphries about buying, selling and renting in western Washington.

Education
11:39 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Online College: Valuable Tool Or Waste Of Your time?

Do online classes work for you?
Flickr Photo/Ed Yourdon

Online learning may be widening the education achievement gap for some community college students in Washington state, according to a new study by researchers at Teacher’s College at Columbia University. They looked at 500,000 courses taken by 40,000 students over a four-year period. And in that study more of the online students dropped out compared to students who took traditional classes in brick-and-mortar buildings. Plus, more online students got failing grades. Ross Reynolds talks with Western Governors University chancellor, Jean Floten about the benefits and drawbacks of online education.

Food Science
10:30 am
Mon March 18, 2013

Synesthetes Really Can Taste The Rainbow

A select group of synesthetes can truly "taste the rainbow."
Photo illustration by Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 8:23 am

Plenty of us got our fill of green-colored food on St. Patrick's Day. (Green beer, anyone?) But for some people, associating taste with color is more than just a once-a-year experience.

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Real Estate Development
10:00 am
Mon March 18, 2013

A Look Inside A Micro Apartment

Microhousing construction in Capitol Hill.
Flickr Photo/Jseattle/Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

We've been taking a look at the rise of microhousing in Seattle. Tiny apartments that offer cheaper rent for less living space have been popping up in high demand neighborhoods like the University District and Capitol Hill. Some residents have voiced concerns over the new developments, fearing they skirt zoning laws and create too much density too quickly. Today, KUOW's Jeannie Yandel takes us inside a micro apartment. Also, we'll talk with Seattle microhousing developer Jim Potter.

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Mountaineering
9:00 am
Mon March 18, 2013

National Geographic's Explorer Of The Year: Mountaineer Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner

At sunset behind Capitol Peak as seen from the summit of K2.
Flickr Photo/Jack Brauer

Mountaineer Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner is the first woman to summit all 14 of the world’s 8,000-plus meter peaks without supplemental oxygen. This accomplishment came with a price. Her 2010 attempt to summit K2 — her last peak — ended when her good friend and partner slipped and fell to his death. A year later, she tried again and was rewarded with a view like she’d never imagined. She said, “I had the feeling that I was one with the universe." We’ll talk with National Geographic's 2012 explorer of the year.

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Latin Music
12:50 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

From Austin, Con Amor: Our Favorites From SXSW

Cafe Tacvba performs at Stubb's during SXSW 2013.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 8:02 am

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Author Interview
11:49 am
Fri March 15, 2013

"Salt, Sugar, Fat: How The Food Giants Hooked Us"

Cover of "Salt, Sugar, Fat" by Michael Moss.

David Hyde sits down with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Michael Moss to talk about the role that processed food companies play in obesity and the health of consumers and what they learned from tobacco companies. 

Washington State Politics
11:48 am
Fri March 15, 2013

This Week In Olympia With Austin Jenkins

Washington state capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova

Where do we stand on universal background checks, education funding and impacts of the automatic budget cuts known as sequestration?

David Hyde checks in with everyone's favorite Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins for an update on the latest in state politics. 

News Savvy
11:46 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Conversation News Quiz!

Don't just walk the walk, take the quiz!
Flickr Photo/An Untrained Eye

A pope, an environmentalist and an actor walk into a bar. Well that is not exactly what happens in this week's Conversation news quiz, but hilarity does ensue. 

Military Tactics
10:45 am
Fri March 15, 2013

NPR Special: Iraq War

An exhibit on the National Mall, Washington, DC, with boots representing soldiers killed in Iraq. May 2006.
Flickr Photo/H Dragon

Coming up on Spotlight, March 18 at 8 p.m.

Ten years ago, a US-led invasion brushed aside Iraq's army and toppled the country’s long-time leader, Saddam Hussein.  The swift military operation quickly became a difficult and complicated occupation. The US found itself fighting an insurgency, and a sectarian conflict nearly consumed the country.

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News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Your Take On The News

It's Friday — time to review the week's top news stories with Knute Berger, Eli Sanders and C.R. Douglas. A federal judge approved a first-year plan to reform the Seattle Police Department. Meanwhile, the plan was challenged in court by the Seattle Police Officer's Guild and the Seattle Police Management Association, over concerns about collective bargaining rights.

Also, a bill that would expand background checks for gun owners died in the state House. And the state's budget shortfall grew by $300 million. What stories were you following this week? Call us at 800.289.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

Government Stimulus
9:00 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Was The TARP Bailout A Failure?

Did the TARP bailout fund help you during the 2008 financial crash?
Flickr Photo/Taber Andrew Bain

Why didn’t the TARP bailout fund help the small businesses and homeowners who were slammed by the 2008 financial crash? Neil Barofsky left his job at the US Attorney’s Office in New York to become special inspector general in charge of overseeing the bailout money. He says, from his first days on the job he was met with hostility from the treasury officials overseeing the TARP fund. He charges that Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner funneled money to Wall Street firms in ways that bordered on corruption. Neil Barofsky joins us with the inside story.

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Historical Memoir
8:00 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Early Recollections Of Prague And War With Madeleine Albright

Former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright at an interactive session on "America, India and Democracy in the 21st Century" in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2006.
Credit AP Photo/Gurinder Osan

Madeleine Albright was the first woman to hold the Secretary of State position for former president Bill Clinton. She became known as an advocate for peace in the Middle East and for bringing war criminals to justice. In her new memoir, she chronicles her traumatic early life in Prague during the Nazi occupation, through the end of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War.

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Public Views
12:28 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

What Iconic Seattle Views Should Be Protected?

Proposed zoning changes in South Lake Union would obstruct the view of the Space Needle from Lake Union Park.
Space Needle Corp. Courtesy Photo

New construction in South Lake Union would block the view of the Space Needle from a park. What views from public places are protected? What Seattle sites are considered so important there are rules to keep them from being blocked? Should there be more?

Ross Reynolds talks with the director of Seattle's Department of Planning and Development Marshall Foster and tries to see the bigger picture when it comes to public views.

Employment Future
12:13 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Will Your Job Be Terminated By A Robot?

The helpful robotic vacuum. The cat is not so convinced.
Flickr Photo/Eirik Newth

Earlier this year IBM’s supercomputer, Watson, took a job with health care company WellPoint. Watson isn’t the only robot taking our jobs. By the end of the century, an estimated 70 percent of current occupations will be replaced by automation. Digital labor will take over assembly lines, write articles and even give legal advice. Where will that leave humans? 

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