More from KUOW

News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri December 7, 2012

Your Take On The News

It’s Friday — time to talk over the week’s news with Joni BalterEli Sanders and Knute Berger. Another week, another candidate for Seattle mayor as state Senator Ed Murray says he's in. Washington state ushered in history-making laws on gay marriage and marijuana. And in Washington, DC, Congress remained perched on the fiscal cliff. What stories caught your attention this week? Call us at 206.543.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

Books
9:00 am
Fri December 7, 2012

Trivia Master Ken Jennings On The Lies Parents Tell

Parents tell their children a lot of things, but how much of it is actually true? Jeopardy! champ and author Ken Jennings peels back the curtain on parental warnings and advice in his new book, "Because I Said So! The Truth Behind the Myths, Tales and Warnings Every Generation Passes Down to its Kids." Join us, and wait at least 30 minutes after listening before going swimming.

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Author Interview
3:15 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

Beth Coleman On "Hello Avatar"

Cover of "Hello Avatar" by Beth Coleman.

Coming up on KUOW Presents on Friday, December 7 at 2:00 p.m.

For many of us there is a distinction between a virtual world and the real world. But writer Beth Coleman argues otherwise. In her book "Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation," Coleman examines a crucial aspect of our cultural shift from analog to digital and what she calls the “x-reality” that crosses between the virtual and the real. We hear her conversation with Wisconsin Public Radio's Anne Strainchamps.

Other Stories On KUOW Presents:

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Prohibition History
2:00 pm
Thu December 6, 2012

The Great Moonshine Conspiracy

Confiscated moonshine liquor still photographed by the Internal Revenue Bureau at the Treasury Department, Washington, D.C., circa 1920s.
Credit Courtesy of the Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

During prohibition in the early 20th century, Franklin County, Virginia was dubbed the moonshine capital of the world. In the most mountainous parts of the county, nearly every farming family was involved in the making and selling of illegal whiskey. The 1920s and 30s were difficult for small scale farmers. Producing moonshine offered extra cash and a path out of poverty.

When prohibition ended, those formerly illegal moonshiners were expected to start paying taxes. Yet they continued to operate illegally in Franklin County. The moonshine trade was an opportunity for the most powerful men in the county to get richer on the backs of poor farmers. The men overseeing the operations would charge large protection fees in exchange for looking the other way.

But in 1935, it all came to a crashing halt. Over 200 farmers testified about their role in the massive racket resulting in Virginia’s Great Moonshine Conspiracy Trial. With the help of a retired World War I spy, the federal government indicted many of the racket's powerful leaders, including the state’s attorney, the sheriff, a federal agent and several deputies. Jesse Dukes of Big Shed Media brings us the story of The Great Moonshine Conspiracy, as told by writer Charlie Thompson.

Other Stories On KUOW Presents:

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Society
11:56 am
Thu December 6, 2012

Same-Sex Marriage Is Legal In Washington - Are You Getting Married Now?

A display of wedding cake toppers featuring same-sex couples.
Credit Flickr/Archie McPhee Seattle

  

As of 12:00 a.m. this morning, same-sex marriage is legal in Washington state. Ross Reynolds hears from listeners who have decided to marry now that they can.

Transportation
11:47 am
Thu December 6, 2012

King County Metro General Manager Kevin Desmond On Rapid Ride And More

On September 29, King County Metro ended the Ride Free Area in downtown Seattle. A 2010 study conducted by Metro estimated that of the 8 million riders boarding buses each year almost 35 percent did not have a pass or transfer. This was costing the agency $2 million annually. In the last few months, what changes have you seen in revenues and ridership since the end of the Free Ride Area? Ross Reynolds talks with King County Metro General Manager Kevin Desmond about these changes and more.

Marijuana
10:00 am
Thu December 6, 2012

Sizing Up Washington's Pot Market

The recreational use of marijuana is now be legal for adults over the age of 21 in Washington under state law.
Credit Flickr Photo/prensa4

Starting today, you can light up in the privacy of your home. State law has changed regarding marijuana possession, but the business rules will have to be developed. The state Liquor Control Board has a year to figure out how to set up Washington’s marijuana market. The federal government’s tax laws will put a crimp on any Washington state entrepreneur until Congress makes a change. We talk to the Aaron Smith of the National Cannabis Industry Association about the path ahead.

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Same-Sex Marriage
9:42 am
Thu December 6, 2012

Dan Savage On Marriage

Dan Savage speaking at Western University, March 2012.
Flickr/Better Than Bacon

Dan Savage is a sex columnist, author, advocate and more.  He is behind the It Gets Better project, an archive of hopeful videos aimed at troubled gay youth, and the author of "The Commitment: Love, Sex, Marriage and My Family." Savage talks to Ross Reynolds about marriage and what he plans to do now that same-sex marriage is legal in Washington state.

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Society
9:00 am
Thu December 6, 2012

Same-Sex Marriage Arrives In Washington State

Bret Goodwin, right, kisses his partner Andy Goodwin in the lobby of the King County Administration Building shortly after the couple received one of the first same-sex marriage licenses issued in the state early Thursday morning, Dec. 6, 2012, in Seattle.
Credit AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Washington state began handing out same-sex marriage licenses last night; the weddings will start on Sunday. We talk with some of the couples who showed up in downtown Seattle at midnight to be among the first to get a marriage license.

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Science
3:46 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Every (Other) Breath You Take

Marine microbes are not as cute as sea otters, but they do produce about half the oxygen on the planet.  Meaning you have microscopic marine microbes to thank for every other breath you take.  And University of Washington oceanographer Ginger Armbrust just received a multi-million dollar grant to study marine microbial ecology from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.  

Ross Reynolds talks with Professor Armbrust about the latest science on the microbes that we can thank for every other breath.

Seattle Mayor
3:42 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

In This Corner, Ed Murray: Another Hat In The Ring For 2013 Mayor Race

Seattle’s Democratic State Senator Ed Murray is running for mayor of Seattle. Ross Reynolds talks with Sen. Murray about the challenges of being Seattle's mayor and what sets him apart from the other candidates.

Legalizing It
3:00 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Washington To Begin Its Grand Experiment With Pot

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Musician Interview
2:00 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

John O'Regan On Becoming Diamond Rings

John O'Regan live at Radio City Music Hall.
Credit Chris La Putt

Musician John O'Regan was touring with his indie rock band when one night after a show he started having convulsions. He was rushed to the hospital where John wound up getting emergency treatment for Crohn's disease. O'Regan had to stay in the hospital for weeks. But all that time in spent recovering kick-started a surprising persona shift in his musical career.

In this excerpt from a longer interview with the CBC's Sook Yin lee, John O'Regan talked about what happened to him during his time spent healing, and what the experience helped him learn about himself and his music.

Other Stories On KUOW Presents:

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Climate Change
12:07 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Landslides And Climate Change: Lessons From Alaska For Seattle

Near the edge of Alaska's Malaspina Glacier, erosion is so rapid that even the bear trails can't keep up and forests wash into the sea.
Credit Ground Truth Trekking

Landslide season has begun. That's when we hear stories about houses sliding down Seattle's famously steep slopes. But according to geologist "Hig" Higman, landslide season is about to get even hairier.

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Other
12:00 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

The Big Flatline: Oil And The No-Growth Economy

Jeff Rubin was a high-flying economist at a major Canadian investment bank, until he decided to write a book about how high oil prices were going to flatten the global economy.  Ross Reynolds talks Jeff Rubin about the steadily mounting demand for cheap oil in a world of dwindling supply.

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