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Family Traditions
2:00 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

Yesterday, Today, And Tomorrow

Curtis DuPuis standing with his grandfather’s canoe
Credit KUOW/Jamala Henderson

As a matter of tradition, Curtis DuPuis’ family didn’t record their stories or write them down. Curtis and his family are members of the Chehalis Tribe and their personal stories and histories were for telling other tribe members only. But Curtis decided to break with that tradition and record the family stories he’d been telling most of his life. He told KUOW’s Jamala Henderson why.

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Gas Tax
12:21 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

Can All The King's Horses And All The King's Men Put Washington's Roads Together Again?

Should we increase the gas tax to fund road repair?
Tom Check Flickr

Outgoing governor Chris Gregoire, the state transportation commission, and the state’s biggest business lobby are calling for an increase in the gas tax to pay for the massive backlog in road repair. Will that deal with the funding problem?

Ross talks with Steve Mullin from the Washington Roundtable, Dan O’Neil of the Washington State Transportation Commission, Rob Johnson of the Transportation Choices Coalition, and Mark Hallenbeck from the Washington State Transportation Center.

News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Your Take On The News

Steve Scher on air in KUOW studios.

It’s Friday — time to review the week’s news with Eli Sanders, Knute BergerDavid Horsey and Bruce Ramsey. The House of Representatives voted 257-167 late Tuesday night to avoid the "fiscal cliff." The deal keeps the Bush tax cuts in place for individuals making less than $400,000 a year, extends federal emergency unemployment benefits and Washington state's sales tax deduction, and sets up Fiscal Cliff 2 in just a few weeks. We'll look at how the deal went down and what lies ahead.

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Arts & Entertainment
9:00 am
Fri January 4, 2013

"Almost Live!" Alums Have Seattle's Number

Tune in on Saturday night to catch the debut of 'The 206.'
Credit Facebook/The 206 TV

Seattle has grown since KING 5's sketch comedy show Almost Live! left the air in 1999. Now some of the team that brought "The Lame List" and "COPS in Wallingford" to TV is back with a new show of modern-day Seattle-centric funny. The 206, starring Pat Cashman, John Keister and Chris Cashman, premieres tomorrow night. They join us in studio with a preview.

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Religion and Gay Marriage
8:00 pm
Thu January 3, 2013

"Straight Talk About Gay Marriage" With Bishop Gene Robinson

Gene Robinson, the world's first openly gay Episcopal bishop, at the Episcopal Diocese of New Hampshire, Dec. 27, 2012.
Jim Cole AP Photo

The first same-sex weddings took place in early December in Washington state. Marriage equality has come a long way in Gene Robinson’s lifetime. He was the first only gay person to become a bishop in the historic traditions of Christendom — and he wore a bulletproof vest to his 2003 consecration.

Today, he’s one of the world’s leading spokespeople for gay rights and gay marriage, and he has been married to a man for the last four years. Robinson spoke at Seattle’s Town Hall on December 7, 2012.

Cultural History
2:00 pm
Thu January 3, 2013

Teddy Bear Vs. Billy Possum

Teddy bears are cuddly, cute, and you can buy one in just about any toy store in the country. But the strange origin of the teddy bear is less well-known. The story becomes even stranger when you consider that advertisers and toy makers alike planned to make American kids throw their teddy bears in the trash — in favor of cuddly, stuffed possums. 99% Invisible: Billy Possum comes to us from the 99% Invisible Podcast produced by Roman Mars, and Independent producer Jon Mooallem.

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Government
12:00 pm
Thu January 3, 2013

Initiative 522 - Genetically Engineered Food Act

  This year Washington voters could be voting on whether foods that have been produced using genetic engineering would have to be labeled as such. Trudy Bialic is the director of public affairs for PCC Natural Markets and a member of the campaign steering committee for Label-It-WA, the campaign that supports Initiative 522. Ross Reynolds talks with her about why she supports the labeling initiative.

Video In Space
10:00 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Forest Gibson: "Going Far Beyond Your Normal Reach"

Forest Gibson, director of the parody video 'We’re NASA and We Know It.'
Credit Courtesy Forest Gibson

Forest Gibson is a Seattle-based video producer and filmmaker. Forest and the company that he works for, Cinesaurus, have a knack for producing videos that get shared on the web and social media. Cinesaurus' clients include GAP, YouTube and the online humor network Cheezburger. One of the company’s biggest successes was the parody video released in the summer of 2012, “We’re NASA and We Know It.”

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International News
10:00 am
Thu January 3, 2013

The Russian Mall Boom

Shopping malls have come to Russia. Investors as diverse as IKEA and Wall Street banks are funneling money into new Russian shopping centers. They are big, and very popular. Russian malls are anchored by grocery stores, where aisles full of fresh food dazzle older shoppers who still carry memories of shortages and food lines. We talk with The New York Times' Moscow correspondent Andrew Kramer about the malls of Russia.

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State Government
9:00 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Lack of Transparency In State Legislature

Last session, Washington state legislators introduced some "title only" bills into committee — essentially blank legislation with the details to be filled in later. They also held hearings on some bills with only two hours public notice, violating the intent of their own rules. Jason Mercier of the Washington Policy Center tells us why he wants to see more accountability in Olympia through greater legislative transparency.

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Author Interview
8:40 am
Thu January 3, 2013

Lessons For The Modern World From The Societies Of 'Yesterday'

In The World Until Yesterday, geography professor Jared Diamond asks: What can we learn from traditional societies?
Penguin Group

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 11:27 am

In his new book, The World Until Yesterday, Jared Diamond tells the story of a young schoolboy named Billy who was killed in a traffic accident on his way home from school in Papua New Guinea.

The driver was alert but simply couldn't stop the car when Billy ran across the road. In an outcome that may surprise people in many parts of the world, the incident was peacefully resolved within days.

Five days after the accident, Diamond explains, the employer and friends of the killer sat down for a meal with the relatives of the dead boy.

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Dancing Away From Suicide
2:00 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Canadian Tre Armstrong On Why Dancing Is Central To Her Life

Tre Armstrong loves to dance. She's a choreographer and an actor. She's also a feisty judge on So You Think You Can Dance Canada. But while dancing is a central part of Tre’s life today, the need to do it actually grew out of experiences from her very difficult childhood. Tre Armstrong talked with the CBC's Sook Yin Lee about how finding new ways to dance kept her going through tough times.

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Words And Phrases
11:35 am
Wed January 2, 2013

What Words From 2012 Would You Banish?

Totes, amazeballs, schweet: plenty to pick from here.
Sam Easterby-Smith Flickr

Bring us your tired metaphors, overused phrases and words that summon an unpleasant visceral reaction. Ben Zimmer, language columnist for the Boston Globe, explains why these words and phrases bother us so much. Sometimes a word variant sounds odd to our ear, even if it’s correct, such as “pleaded” rather than “plead.” Other problems arise when words reveal disparities, such as a lack of an equivalent term for the opposite gender. And jargon can become offensive when it migrates from its original community to more common use in mainstream media or by different age groups.

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Northwest Business News
10:00 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Canada, Commerce And Culture: NW Business News And Films At MOHAI

Victoria Times-Colonist columnist Les Leyne brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton shares some of the movie offerings at Seattle's newly reopened Museum of History and Industry. Then, Michael Parks looks at Amazon's big 2012, Microsoft's make-or-break 2013 and what Boeing's backlog means for the region's employment.

Economy And Politics
9:00 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Congress Reaches A Deal On Fiscal Cliff

The House voted 257-167 late last night to pass the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012. The bill now goes to the President, but sets up another confrontation over taxes and spending in just weeks. We check in with Jill Jackson of CBS News and hear from Representative Jim McDermott about why he voted against the deal.

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