More from KUOW

Public Safety
9:00 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Behind The Scenes With SPD's Bomb Unit

A bomb squad exercise.
Credit Flickr Photo/Settsu

Investigators are trying to piece together this week's bombings at the Boston Marathon. What clues are they looking for? How are bombs detected and disarmed? Seattle Police Department explosives experts Randy Curtis and Craig Williamson join us with an inside look. Call with your questions to 206.543.5869.


VIDEO: Watch Dennis the SPD Bomb Dog In Action

Calling For Help
12:11 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

If Calling 911 Is So Easy, Why Are People Doing It Wrong?

When calling 911, know your location.
Flickr Photo/nadbasher

A new public service announcement by the state’s Emergency Management Division urges you to always “know your location” just in case you have to call 911. Emergency dispatchers say they often get calls from people who can’t describe where they are or even how to get there. With 70 percent of 911 calls coming from cell phones, it’s much harder for operators to pinpoint a specific location.

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Agriculture
12:09 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Bugs: Nutritious And Delicious!

Would you eat bugs?
Flickr Photo/Paul Esson

Feeling hungry? Bring on the bugs! High in protein and easy to farm, bugs are nutritious and sustainable, and according to some, even delicious.

Ross Reynolds talked to The Bug Chef David George Gordon, the author of "Eat-A-Bug Cookbook." The cookbook covers how to properly find, prepare, and eat everything from scorpions to waxworms. And he brought along some delicacies -- mealworms, caterpillars and crickets -- for brave producers Hannah Burn and Arwen Nicks to enjoy.

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Tulalip Tribe
12:05 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

From Vietnam To Fisherman: Tulalip Tribe Chairman Mel Sheldon Talks Life Then And Now

Mel Sheldon is chairman of the Tulalip Tribe, but he wasn’t always in politics. Chairman Sheldon fished for 25 years. Before that he worked as a houseboy at two University of Washington sororities. And before that, Sheldon served as a pilot in Vietnam.

Chairman Sheldon says he likes “life on the edge," he likes being busy and he likes working hard. Ross Reynolds talks with Tulalip Tribe Chairman Mel Sheldon about his life, career and hopes for the future.

News & Analysis
10:00 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Canadian flag.
Credit Flickr Photo/Arlo Bates

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton reviews what's happening on the silver screen. Then, Michael Parks wraps up the region's recent economic news.

Education
9:00 am
Wed April 17, 2013

Closing The Opportunity Gap For Students Of Color

Closing the opportunity gap for students.

Trish Millines Dziko co-founded the Technology Access Foundation in 1996 to provide science, math, engineering and technology education for Seattle's students of color. Access to technology has improved since the foundation was created, but many low-income students and students of color still face obstacles to becoming innovators and creators. How can we close the gap so all students have equal opportunities? Can programs like this work in all of our school districts? Trish Dziko joins us.

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Poetry
3:22 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Karen Finneyfrock's Monstrous Spring

Poet and novelist Karen Finneyfrock.
Credit Photo Credit/Inti St. Clair

A  Metro bus ride inspires poet, novelist and teaching artist Karen Finneyfrock to find a delightfully surprising personification for Northwest springtime in her poem "Monster."

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Parenting
3:07 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

A Family Made And Unmade

Credit Flickr Photo/sidewalk flying (CC BY-NC-ND)

Mike Checuga and his son Victor defied everyone's expectations. After all, what would a carefree 25-year-old white bachelor know about raising a black kid rescued from an abusive orphanage? Yet the two grew very close.

Victor excelled in the fancy school where Mike managed to find him a berth. He acted out, as many kids would. But Mike laid down the law, sometimes sitting in class next to Victor if that's what it took to keep him in line. But when Victor reached high school, parenting him became much more challenging.

Falling Into A Role

Victor was one of the only black kids in his school, and the white students assumed he could get drugs for them. It was blatant stereotyping. Victor had no history with drugs. But he enjoyed being popular. So he fell into the role. That led to a dark period for the Checuga family.

Victor repeatedly got in trouble with the law. At one point, Mike sort of gave up on Victor. He told Victor, if he was going to keep selling drugs, he should change his name and never have anything to do with him again. And that's where their relationship could have ended. Instead, it paved the way for a remarkable reconciliation, one that left both father and son changed forever.

Other Stories on KUOW Presents, Tuesday, April 16:

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Seattle City Attorney
12:00 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Why Was Pete Holmes In Copenhagen?

Pete Holmes is Seattle’s city attorney and that means his clients include the mayor, the City Council, the police and the public. Pete Holmes previously worked as a private attorney in Seattle for almost 25 years before being elected city attorney in November 2009. He was also an original member of the Seattle Police Department's Office of Professional Accountability Review Board (OPARB) and served as chairman from 2003 to 2008. Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes about the recent retirement of Police Chief John Diaz, the Department of Justice and what he was doing in Copenhagen. 

Author Interview
11:58 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Has The Internet Turned All Us Davids Into Goliaths?

Cover of 'The End of Big" by Nicco Mele.

According to Nicco Mele the Internet is the great leveler and the age of "big" has ended. Who has power and control when almost everyone has access? Ross Reynolds talks to Nicco Mele about the Internet, the distribution of power and his new book, "The End of Big." 

Religion & Politics
10:00 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Theologian Jim Wallis: Restore Faith In The Common Good

'On God's Side' by Jim Wallis.
Credit Courtesy/Brazos Press

Progressive theologian Jim Wallis thinks America needs to reacquaint itself with the notion of the “the common good." He says that means protecting the poor, fostering civil discourse, building economic trust and faith in democracy and working together to create healthier families and lifestyles.

He writes: “People were made for family, community, and human flourishing, not consumerism, materialism, addiction, and empty overwork.” Jim Wallis is editor-in-chief of Sojourners magazine. He joins us to discuss his latest book, "On God’s Side: What Religion Forgets and Politics Hasn’t Learned about Serving the Common Good."

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Politics & Government
9:00 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Ask Governor Jay Inslee

Governor Jay Inslee.
Credit Courtesy/Washington Secretary of State

It's getting down to the wire at the state capitol in Olympia, where lawmakers are working to pass a budget in the final weeks of the 105-day state Legislative session. Legislators are bargaining over how to best meet a state Supreme Court ruling to amply fund public education to the tune of $1 billion. There's also talk of toughening DUI laws, and a dispute over funding for the Columbia River Crossing in Southwest Washington. We'll ask Governor Jay Inslee about the latest news. Have a question for the governor? Call us at 206.543.5869 or send an email to weekday@kuow.org.

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Gun Control
1:10 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Gun Stories: Store Owners Find Themselves On The Front Line Of Gun Debate

Credit David Nogueras, OPB

Today on KUOW Presents, we hear the first in a series of reports that will examine the varying perspectives in the Pacific Northwest on guns. We'll hear from hunters, police, criminals, and gun-violence victims, among others. These are their "Gun Stories." We start with a visit to the people who make a living out of buying and selling firearms.

Other stories on KUOW Presents, Monday, April 15, 2013:

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State Budget
11:56 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Happy Birthday State Parks! Let's Hope This Budget Doesn't Kill You

Have you enjoyed the state park system?
Flickr Photo/Flickstorage

It’s the 100th birthday of Washington's state park system, but it may not be a happy one. Washington’s parks started off this year with zero dollars from the state. While both the Senate and House budget proposals give more than $15 million to our state parks, the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission says under the Senate’s budget the doors to some state parks will likely close.

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Government Paperwork
11:54 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Should The IRS Do Our Taxes For Us?

How long did you spend doing your taxes?
Flickr Photo/401(K) 2013

Today is the deadline for filing your taxes, and maybe you’re a little burnt out on the whole process. The New York Times reports that Americans spend 9.14 billion hours on government paperwork every year. Of that time 75 percent, or 6.7 billion hours, is spent on documents from The Treasury Department. According to author and law professor, Cass Sunstein, it’s because the Treasury Department houses the Internal Revenue Service, which takes up way too much of our time during tax season. Sunstein was head of the White House’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs from 2009-2012, and he wrote a recent op-ed article for the New York Times on this topic. Ross Reynolds talks with Sunstein and asks if the IRS is wasting our time.

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