More from KUOW

Seattle History
9:00 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Seattle's History In 25 Objects

Thousands of years ago this skeleton was a Giant Ground Sloth. These gigantic, bear-like animals were once common all over North America. This guy was around roughly at the end of the Ice-Age.
Burke Museum

What do a burned glue pot, a vintage cardigan and a Starbucks coffee cup share in common? In this case, each represents a chapter in Seattle's history. Inspired by the BBC's A History of the World In 100 Objects, we reached out to local museum curators, artifact owners, writers and historians to help us narrow down a list of 25 objects that tell Seattle’s story. Writer and author Knute Berger and MOHAI historian Lorraine McConaghy join us for a look into the past.

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Poetry
5:00 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Poet Suzanne Edison On Parenting A Chronically Ill Child

Poet Suzanne Edison
Credit Seedison Designs

Learning that your child has a serious, chronic illness is like falling off a cliff, without knowing how — or if — your feet will ever find the ground again, says poet Suzanne Edison.

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Aeronautical Hijinks
2:00 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Take A Left At The Kremlin

Too many people had seen the arrival of Mathias Rust for Soviet officials to hush up the incident. The press was allowed to run with it, even though it was an embarrassment for the country. For this reason, Mathias Rust believes his arrival helped Gorbachev open the press.
Credit unknown newspaper, 1987 (fair use)

Every country has its outlaw heroes. Billy The Kid. Joan of Arc. Pancho Villa. In West Germany, there’s an outlaw hero you may not have heard of. His name’s Mathias Rust. And like most outlaw heroes, he seems to represent a certain old-school morality in a world gone bad. At the height of the cold war, the teenaged Rust was convinced the world was headed for global war.

Maybe he was a little full of himself, but Rust thought he could change things. So he rented a single engine plane and flew it past Russian air defenses. He made it all the way to Moscow, where he buzzed Lenin’s tomb and landed near Red Square. He earned some time in a labor camp, but in the end, the Russians couldn’t help cracking a smile. They pardoned him.

Hear him describe his amazing stunt on KUOW Presents.

More stories from KUOW Presents, Tuesday, January 29:

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Personal Records
12:40 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Preserving Personal Information

Wire recording, Gould Family, approximately late 1950s, from the collection of Seattle architect Carl Gould (who designed Suzzallo Library and many of the buildings on campus). From the Special Collections Archive, Allen Library, UW.
KUOW Photo/Amber Cortes

What kind of record are we leaving behind for the next generation? Physical objects get damaged in floods and fires, or simply get moldy in the basement. Think you're better off going digital? Think again. Hard drives crash. Compact discs deteriorate. And cloud-based computing companies get shuttered or go out of business.

Our personal records seem so vulnerable. It leaves one wondering: Are we leaving any kind of a lasting record? Ross talks with archivist John Bolcer and a digital media expert Cathy Marshall. Do you want to protect something of yours for the future? Today's guests will tell you how.

Listener Call-In
12:20 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Boy Scouts May End Ban On Gay Scouts And Leaders

David Blumenkrantz Flickr

The Boy Scouts of America are thinking about ending their ban on gay scouts or scout leaders.  How are scouts responding in the Northwest?  Were you ever involved with the Boy Scouts?  How would this change affect you? Ross Reynolds takes your phone calls.

Driverless Cars
12:00 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

In The Future, Cars Will Drive You!

One of Google's self-driving cars in Mountain View, Calif., May 2012.
Eddie Codel Flickr

Drunk drivers, speeding tickets and parking could be a thing of the past. Google is developing driverless cars that use sensors to transport people safely and efficiently to any location. They claim driverless cars will reduce traffic accidents by 90 percent. Does it sound like something from science fiction? Ross finds out by talking to Forbes Magazine contributor Chunka Mui.

Immigration
10:00 am
Tue January 29, 2013

The Politics Of Federal Immigration Reform

Sen. Robert Menendez and Sen. Charles Schumer join a bipartisan group of leading senators to announce that they have reached agreement on the principles of sweeping legislation to rewrite the nation's immigration laws, during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, Jan. 28, 2013. The deal covers border security, guest workers and employer verification, as well as a path to citizenship for the 11 million illegal immigrants already in this country.
Credit AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite


There appears to be a bipartisan deal in Congress to reform the country's immigration policy, as Democrats and Republicans dance a delicate dance in the hopes that neither party jeopardizes the agreement. The proposal by a Senate "Gang of Eight" creates a path to citizenship for 11 million people living in the US without documentation, creates a more secure border and, the GOP hopes, could reshape the political calculations of a growing segment of the electorate. We look at the policy and the politics of immigration reform with University of Washington pollster Matt Barreto.

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Books
4:30 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

A Conversation With Author Julie Otsuka

Author Julie Otsuka.
Credit Courtesy/Julie Otsuka Facebook Page

American history is full of stories of disenfranchised women who assert their rightful role in society and in so doing, open up the culture. Author Julie Otsuka’s family was interned following the bombing of Pearl Harbor; her father was arrested as a potential spy. She told that story in her award-winning first novel, “When the Emperor Was Divine.” Her second novel, “The Buddha in the Attic,” reaches farther back to explore the lives of brides sent from Japan to America between the wars, and the strain of traditional values in a nation that promised opportunity for all. The writer Julie Otsuka joins us.

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Author Interview
11:04 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Jon Ronson Discusses His Wacky Experiences In Journalism

Journalist Jon Ronson
Alexio's pics Flickr

Journalist Jon Ronson has interviewed a wide array of interesting characters, ranging from the hip-hop duo, Insane Clown Posse, to a man who tried to split the atom in his kitchen. Ronson is the bestselling author of "The Psychopath Test" and "The Men Who Stare at Goats."

Ross talks to him about his new book, "Lost at Sea," where he discusses his journalistic endeavors and demonstrates just how intriguing the human race can be, for example, local vigilante Phoenix Jones.

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Future Of Books
11:02 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Are Traditional Libraries In Jeopardy?

Do you think libraries have a future?
emdot Flickr

Thousands of librarians are gathering in Seattle for the annual ALA Midwinter Meeting, and they've got a lot to talk about. Ross Reynolds spoke with ALA President Maureen Sullivan about the future of libraries and how they survive in a digital age.

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The Business Of Marijuana
10:57 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Potrepeneurs Visit Seattle

Today investors from around the world are convening to discuss investments in cannabis-related products. The ArcView Group, a San Francisco investment consulting company, is hosting the meeting. And this time, the focus won't be on the growth and sale of marijuana. Instead, it's about all the other related products: lights for growing, portable cases for joints, etc. Ross talks to Roy Kaufman from ArcView for details.

International News
10:00 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Douglas Foster On South Africa After Mandela

Douglas Foster's 'After Mandela: The Struggle For Freedom In Post-Apartheid South Africa.'
Credit Courtesy/Liveright

Capitalism, democracy and HIV all arrived at about the same time in South Africa, where the promise of the Mandela era has still not been met. The nation struggles with an epidemic of poverty, illness and violence. Can the next generation of leaders reshape its cultural and political realities? Douglas Foster, author of "After Mandela: The Struggle for Freedom in Post-Apartheid South Africa," joins us.

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Education
9:00 am
Mon January 28, 2013

Seattle Considers School Funding Levies

If it passes, Proposition 1 would give Seattle Schools money for day-to-day needs like books, transportation and student activities.
Credit Flickr photo/Michael Porter

Next month, Seattle voters will be asked to renew two expiring levies to fund Seattle Public Schools. Proposition 1 would raise nearly $552 million over three years to fund day-to-day expenses like textbooks, transportation and student activities. Proposition 2 would raise nearly $695 million over six years to pay for building renovations, earthquake safety improvements and security cameras. The two levies combined would cost the owner of a $400,000 home an additional $152 per year in property taxes. Should Seattle voters renew the levies? We'll take up Prop 1 and Prop 2.

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Online Piracy
5:26 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

The Day The Internet Went Dark And How It Changed History

A protester in Madrid, Spain, wears a Guy Fawkes mask associated with the hacker group Anonymous. A hacker claiming association with the group took down MIT's website to post a memorial to Internet activist Aaron Swartz.
Credit flickr/gaelx

A little over a year ago, Wikipedia, Google and thousands of other websites went dark. They were protesting an Internet privacy act being considered in Congress. It was the largest protest ever conducted on the Internet. And it worked.

One of its organizers was Aaron Swartz. Swartz advocated for the Internet to be free. His quest for free information got him in trouble.  He was caught trying to leak academic papers to the public. The US Department of Justice tried to make an example out of him. But he committed suicide.

Today, we hear an in-depth report on Swartz’s most successful campaign: the online protest that stopped SOPA, the Stop Online Piracy Act, from becoming law.

Other Stories on KUOW Presents, January 28, 2013:

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Mental Health
12:40 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

Why Are Women More Depressed Than Men?

Flickr Photo/Majicdolphin

Women around the world are 2 to 6 times more likely than men to suffer from depression. Today Ross talks to author Dana Jack about her new book “Silencing the Self Across Cultures,” where she explores the reasons for the troubling sadness and silence of women across the globe.

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