More from KUOW

Jazz Performance
9:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Chick Corea: "Darn That Dream"

Chick Corea and Marcie Sillman
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Chick Corea plays "Darn That Dream"

Pianist and composer Chick Corea has touched almost all the musical bases during a career that has spanned almost five decades.  From avant garde to bebop to Latin fusion, Corea has experimented and mastered multiple jazz styles and has won a loyal following of fans and critics.

Marcie Sillman interviews Chick Corea

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The Vatican
8:00 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

"The Vatican Diaries" With John Thavis

Cover of 'The Vatican Diaries' by John Thavis.

What happens behind the scenes at the Vatican? Journalist John Thavis has covered the Vatican for almost 30 years, and he hopes to offer insight into its power and politics in his new book, “The Vatican Diaries.”

Thavis was in Rome when Pope Benedict XVI resigned and when Pope Francis was elected. He spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on April 7, 2013.

Women's Rights
12:58 pm
Thu May 2, 2013

In Egypt, Sexual Harassment On The Rise Under Muslim Brotherhood

Women descend a staircase in Cairo, Egypt
Credit Flickr photo/ pixelwhippersnapper

Egypt is currently under the rule of the conservative Muslim Brotherhood. Yet sexual harassment is on the rise there. A recent UN survey showed most Egyptian women have suffered from it. And in many cases, that harassment comes from the Muslim Brotherhood itself.

Other stories on KUOW Presents, Thursday, May 2:

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Patriot Groups
11:54 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Number Of "Patriot" Groups Skyrockets In Washington State

Flickr/David Paul Ohmer

Three in 10 registered American voters believe an armed rebellion might be necessary in the next few years according to pollsters at Fairleigh Dickinson University. Anti-government extremism has grown in other ways too.  Here in Washington state, the number of anti-government patriot groups has grown from two in 2008 to 52 in 2012, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.

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Weight Discrimination
11:44 am
Thu May 2, 2013

How Common Is Weight Discrimination In Washington State?

Flickr/Alex E. Proimos

A new study from Johns Hopkins University finds that overweight patients are treated with less warmth than thinner patients by doctors. That kind of discrimination is not limited to the doctor’s office. Many overweight people say they face discrimination, mistreatment and bias in their daily lives.

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Arts and Entertainment
10:00 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Seattle Reads Gregory Martin, And Comics On The Radio

Cover of Gregory Martin's "Stories For Boys."

 

Seattle Reads: Gregory Martin
What would you do if you found out that your 65-year-old father had attempted suicide? Or that he’d been sexually abused by his own father? Or that he’d been a closeted gay man throughout 39 years of marriage? Gregory Martin learned all this one evening, and it changed his relationship with his parents. Martin chronicles his experiences in the memoir "Stories for Boys," this year’s Seattle Reads book.

Radio Retrospective: Comics On The Radio
We’re familiar with comics being adapted to the big screen. But you might not know that comic strip adaptations aren’t new. Comics were also adapted into radio dramas. There’s Blondie, Archie Andrews, and Superman, and that’s just the beginning.  Listen back to the comics strips of the radio.

A Lunch Recommendation
Food writer Sara Dickerman joins us with a lunch recommendation. Prefer to cook for yourself? She also has a pick for a great cookbook!

International News
9:00 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Crisis In Syria, Winning The White House, And Ezra Dickinson

A young man in Raqqa City, Syria.
Flickr Photo/Beshr O

  A Look At The Humanitarian Crisis In Syria
President Obama has said that although we have evidence of chemical weapons being used inside of Syria, they don’t know when or who used them. While the administration is considering increasing aid to the country, it has stopped short of providing lethal aid to rebel groups. Two years after the start of the revolution, Syria has descended into a civil war with over 70,000 citizens killed and over one million refugees seeking asylum outside of the country.

Winning The White House In 2016: Rule 5
Are presidents today more empathetic than they were in the past? To win the presidency in 2016, a candidate must seem to deeply care about American citizens. University of Washington department of communication chair and professor David Domke explains why that is the expectation now and how it is different from the past.

Art Of Our City: Mother For You I Made This
Dancer and choreographer Ezra Dickinson created a series of solos to honor the woman who guided him to a dance career, his mother. But Ezra Dickinson has a different relationship with his parent than the one most of us have.  Dickinson’s mother is schizophrenic, and she spent a good portion of her adult life on the streets.  He has woven the solos together into a single performance he hopes will spark conversation about the American mental health system.

Human Rights
2:00 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

A Rare Look Inside A Cuban Prison

Prison bars.
Credit Flickr Photo/jellevc

For the first time in almost a decade, Cuba has allowed foreign journalists to visit several of its prisons.

It's part of an effort to show improvements ahead of a review of the government's human rights record at the United Nations. But access for expert monitors like the Red Cross remains barred.

These days far fewer Cubans are being imprisoned for their political views, but activists say hundreds of dissidents still suffer detention by police.

Other stories on KUOW Presents on Wednesday, May 1, 2013:

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Same-Sex Marriage
12:29 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Same Sex Marriage: What Happens Next?

Fran Simon, left, and her partner Anna Simon, flanked by their son Jeremy, display their Colorado civil union license. They were the first couple to receive their license as the Colorado Civil Union went into effect on May 1.
AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Last November Washington became the first state to legalize same sex marriage at the polls but today we want to check in on what is happening with the same-sex marriage debate in and out of the Evergreen State.

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LGBTQ
12:23 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Coming Out: The Mavericks

AP Photo/Elise Amendola

“I’m a 34-year-old NBA center. I’m black. And I’m gay.”

So started the essay by active NBA player Jason Collins, the first openly gay NBA player. In fact, Collins is the first openly gay male athlete who is still active in a major American team sport. 

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Education In America
12:12 pm
Wed May 1, 2013

Smart Enough To Get Into College, Not Smart Enough To Go?

Flickr Photo/Ted Major

Nearly half of all US undergraduates show up to their first day of class unprepared for the rigors of college life. Many of these students require extra education to ready them for their college courses.

These extra classes cost time and money, leading students to drop out or pile on additional debt. To solve this, some colleges are turning to the fast-growing supply of online courses to help prepare their freshmen for college.

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News & Analysis
10:00 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Canadian flag.
Flickr Photo/Christopher Policarpio

BC’s Premier Candidates Meet In First Debate
The four candidates who want to be British Columbia’s next premier met for their first TV debate on Monday night. Jobs and the economy topped the agenda. Analysts say the embattled Liberal Party premier didn’t get the knock out she needed to hold on to her job. Vaughn Palmer of the Vancouver Sun joins us to discuss the election.

When Words Don’t Matter: The Non-Verbal In Movies
The classic science fiction film from Stanley Kubrick, "2001: A Space Odyssey," told much of its story through image, gesture and sound. The spoken word was often secondary to the plot. According to film critic Robert Horton, a new film, "Renoir," relies on images to convey mood and feeling to moderate success.

Grocery Delivery Services Benefit The Environment
A new University of Washington study suggests that deliveries by trucks are actually better for the environment than each of us driving to the store in our own cars. That might be good news for Amazon Fresh. The company has been testing this grocery delivery service in Seattle since 2007. There are indications Amazon is planning to expand Fresh to other markets. Todd Bishop explores how Amazon Fresh and other grocery delivery services are faring.

Social Issues
9:00 am
Wed May 1, 2013

May Day, Mike Daisey's New Show, And Deborah Madison On Vegetable Literacy

Cover of "Vegetable Literacy" by Deborah Madison.

The Labor History Of May Day
On International Workers Day, much of the world celebrates the labor movement. In Seattle, thousands are expected for a rally and march for worker and immigrant rights as well as smaller “anti-capitalist” protests. University of Washington professor George Lovell joins us to talk about May Day’s origins.

Solo Performer And Storyteller, Mike Daisey
Mike Daisey is known for his edgy and thought-provoking solo performances. His monologue "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs" was downloaded over 100,000 times in the first week of its release. It also caused a rift between Daisey and This American Life host Ira Glass when it was discovered that the script blurred the line between fact and fiction.

Deborah Madison Improves Your Vegetable Literacy
You recognize a carrot, no doubt, but do you know what vegetable family it belongs to? The carrot is related to dill, parsley, anise and cumin. That’s why their flavors go together so well. Vegetarian cooking expert Deborah Madison is the chef and author behind “Vegetable Literacy.”

Seattle Politics
3:46 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Eight Candidates Vie To Be Seattle's Next Mayor

The 2013 Seattle mayor’s race is off and running and last night was the first big mayoral forum of the campaign season. All eight candidates appeared before a packed room at Seattle Central Community College and KUOW's Deborah Wang was in attendance. Ross Reynolds sat down with Deborah to talk about who is in the race and the dreams that pushed them to run.

Public Health
3:06 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

HIV Tests No Longer Just For High Risk Groups

A health worker drops blood from a sample on an HIV test strip in San Salvador, June 25, 2010.
AP Photo/Luis Romero

Every person between the ages of 15 and 65, regardless of risk factors, should get routinely tested for HIV. That’s the recommendation from the US Preventative Services Task Force, an independent panel of doctors and researchers.

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