More from KUOW

Pop Legend
8:19 am
Mon February 4, 2013

The Roots Of Beyonce's Super Bowl Spectacular

Beyonce performs during the Super Bowl halftime show Sunday night.
Ezra Shaw Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 9:38 am

One of the Twitter hashtags devised by rabid Beyonce fans before last night's Super Bowl halftime show was religious in nature: #praisebeysus. Praise Beysus! This bit of hyperventilating resonated in interesting ways. Strutting into the very center of America's biggest television spectacle, the 31-year-old superstar intended to secure her place in the musical pantheon next to recent Super Bowl-approved legends Madonna, The Who, Bruce Springsteen and Prince.

Read more
Listener Call-In
11:24 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Do You Volunteer?

Haitian Red Cross volunteer Jean Zacharie delivers first aid to 1-month-old Deborah Fatima, January 2010.
American Red Cross Flickr

According to the Federal Agency for Service and Volunteering, 34 percent of Washington residents volunteer. Are you one of those people? Today, Ross Reynolds hears stories about the ups and downs of volunteering.

Read more
Seattle Police Reform
11:18 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Policing The Seattle Police: What Will The New Community Commission Do?

Seattle Police Officers salute during a memorial service, 2006.
AP Photo/Kevin P. Casey

As part of the agreement with the Department of Justice to implement reforms in the Seattle Police Department, Mayor Mike McGinn proposed the creation of a Community Police Commission. The 13-member commission, selected by the mayor and City Council,  is supposed to ensure that the police are acting lawfully and safely.

The commission still has to be confirmed by the City Council, but Ross Reynolds sits down with commission co-chair and deputy director of the Defender Association, Lisa Daugaard, to discuss what the commission can and hopes to accomplish.

News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Your Take On The News

Weekday's News In Review panel at a live event.
Credit KUOW Photo/Serene Careaga



It’s Friday — time to review the week’s news with Joni Balter, Eli Sanders and Knute Berger. Seattle's first gun buyback in more than 20 years takes in more than 700 firearms and brings an impromptu gun show to downtown. The debate over the future of Washington state's prepaid tuition program continues in Olympia. And in Washington DC, a Senate "Gang of Eight" and the president signal a way forward on immigration reform that includes tighter border security and a "path to citizenship" for more than 11 million people living in the country without documentation. What stories caught your attention this week? Call us 206.543.5869, send an email to weekday@kuow.org or use #weekinreview to share your thoughts with us on Twitter during the show.

Arts & Entertainment
9:00 am
Fri February 1, 2013

A Conversation With Music Legend Dr. John

Dr. John performing in 2011.
Credit Flickr photo/Jazz Fest Wien Team

Dr. John has been in the right place and the wrong place but it's always the right time for his music. The multiple Grammy Award-winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee has been playing music since he was a teenager. His most recent album, "Locked Down," was produced by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys and has him playing a Farfisa organ while he sings of revolution, the scourge of crack and the goodness of god. We talk with Mac Rebennack, a.k.a. Dr. John, ahead of his shows at Seattle's Jazz Alley.

Read more
Friendships And Family
8:00 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Intersectional Friendships: Debunking Stereotypes About Odd Couples

Odd pair.
Credit Flickr photo/Fixeche

Anna Muraco calls the relationships between gay men and straight women, and straight men and gay women, "intersectional friendships." By interviewing many intersectional friendships, Muraco found the stereotypical reason these relationships are formed is false and limiting in the way we view family, friendship and social norms. Muraco spoke at the University Book Store on January 16, 2013.

Read more
Classical Music
5:14 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Schubert And The Minimalists: Savoring The Journey

Seattle Weekly music writer and composer Gavin Borchert.
Credit Courtesy/Gavin Borchert

  

The old saying “it’s about the journey, not the destination” is one that comes to mind when listening to the music of Franz Schubert. Seattle Weekly music writer and composer Gavin Borchert has been thinking a lot lately about Schubert and the distinctive way the composer’s music slowly unfolds over time. To Gavin’s ears, Schubert, an early 19th century composer, has a strong kinship with American minimalist composers of the 20th and 21st centuries. That kinship is explored in a new recording called “The Knights:  A Second of Silence.”

Read more
Unpaid Internships
4:50 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

The Movie Studio Intern Who’ll Never Work In Hollywood Again

Interns compete in the "Intern Olympics" at an advertising agency in St. Louis, Missouri.
Credit Flickr/lolololori

Many industries depend on a steady stream of unpaid interns. In the movie industry, interns are lured by the chance to work alongside big stars or important directors. The dangled promise of a future career keeps them glued to their computer workstations late into the night.

Eric Glatt found himself in such a position. He looked into the law, and began to suspect his employer’s reliance on interns was illegal. So he sued. Hear his story today on KUOW Presents.

Other stories from KUOW Presents on February 1:

Read more
Social Media
3:11 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Episode 36: RadioActive Is In A Relationship With Facebook

Credit Molly Freed

In RadioActive's first podcast of 2013, hosts Antonia Dorn and Ann Kane bring us a story from producer Molly Freed who talks about how she learned to have a healthy relationship with her Facebook page. Then we ask the question: Why do you use Facebook?

You'll have to listen to find out what the slang of the month is. Hint: Nicki Minaj.

Read more
Civil Rights
2:00 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Gay And Black, Bayard Rustin Was A Little Too Complicated For The Early Civil Rights Movement

A Portrait of Bayard Rustin
Credit Flickr/Felix Jackson, Jr.

Many people have not heard of Bayard Rustin. Rustin is the man who taught MLK about non-violence, a strategy he’d learned from Gandhi. Rustin organized the 1963 March on Washington. But he was discouraged from being a public spokesperson for civil rights because he was gay. Many activists at the time felt the movement wasn’t big enough to include homosexuality.

We hear about the pattern of public humiliation that kept Rustin out of the history books. And about how he finally found peace when the culture caught up with him.

Other stories from KUOW Presents on Thursday, January 31:

Read more
Transportation
12:40 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Sound Transit’s Trials And Tribulations

Sound Transit CEO Joni Earl at the Sea-Tac Link light rail opening ceremony in 2009.
Atomic Taco Flickr

Sound Transit has been under fire lately for poor budgeting, rider shortages and even for train interruptions due to mud slides. The regional transit provider is the force behind Link light rail in Seattle and Tacoma and the Sounder train, which stretches from Lakewood through Seattle and up to Everett. Their express-bus system serves passengers in King, Pierce and Snohomish Counties. Today Ross talks to Sound Transit Executive Director Joni Earl to find out what the future holds for our regional trains and buses.

Election Funding
12:20 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Should Seattle City Elections Be Publicly Funded?

What are your thoughts on publicly-funded election campaigns?
marsmet531 Flickr

The Seattle City Council is thinking about developing a publicly-funded approach to campaign finance. The Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission would develop a detailed plan and voters would decide whether to approve it later this year. The idea to use public money to fund city campaigns is meant to open up the political arena to candidates who might not otherwise run for office. On Thursday, city councilmembers will meet with representatives from Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles to see how publicly funded campaigns have played out in their cities.

Read more
Sports
10:00 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Is Football Safe For Kids?

How harmful is playing football to athletes?
Credit Flickr photo/Nathan Rupert

The greatest sports spectacle on Earth takes place this Sunday: the Super Bowl. As millions around the world take in the commercials, the halftime show — and, of course, the actual game — football is facing a crisis. Thirty-three deceased former NFL players have been found to have suffered from a degenerative brain disorder called CTE, brought on by years of head trauma and concussions. Even President Obama has expressed concern, telling The New Republic that if he had a son, “I'd have to think long and hard before I let him play football.” It football safe for kids? We’ll take an in-depth look at the issue with youth football coach Chris Gradwohl and Dr. Kim Harmon of the University of Washington.

Read more
Personal Finance
9:00 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Your Housing Questions Answered

House for sale.
Credit Flickr photo/Ian Muttoo

The housing market is showing signs of recovery and construction has started once again on developments delayed by the recession. That doesn’t mean everyone is in good shape. Many homeowners remain underwater, with home values nowhere near the purchase price. Then there are the questions about refinancing or buying something new. Real estate and housing experts Richard Hagar and Linda Taylor are here to help. Call 206.543.5869 with your questions or send us an email at weekday@kuow.org.

Read more
Poetry
5:00 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

A Poet's View On Parenting And Chronic Illness

Poet Suzanne Edison
Credit Seedison.com

Poet Suzanne Edison knows the ups and downs of chronic illness too well. Her daughter has juvenile myositis, a rare autoimmune disorder. Today she reads two poems about the way her child’s illness affects her parenting: “Betrayal” and “Bloodwork.”

Read more

Pages