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Global Fish Market
9:21 am
Mon March 11, 2013

International Convention Moves To Limit Shark 'Finning' Trade

Indonesian fishermen unload their catch, including sharks and baby sharks, in Lampulo fish market in Banda Aceh last week.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 11:33 am

Delegates to an international species conservation conference in Bangkok, Thailand, this week have agreed to limit the trade of shark fins and meat.

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that government representatives to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, have agreed to put the porbeagle, oceanic whitetip, three kinds of hammerhead shark and two kinds of manta ray on its Appendix II list, which places restrictions on fishing but still allows limited trade.

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Seattle Politics
9:00 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Ask Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn
Credit Courtesy/City of Seattle

Last week, court-appointed monitor Merrick Bobb submitted his first-year plan for reforming the Seattle Police Department. On Friday, Mayor Mike McGinn accepted the plan, saying there's a mutual understanding that it's a living document that can be amended. Meanwhile, the Seattle Police Department is rolling out software that it claims will help predict where crimes are likely to occur. What's the proof that it works? Have a question for the mayor? Call us at 800.289.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

Art & Design
4:23 am
Mon March 11, 2013

For John Baldessari, Conceptual Art Means Serious Mischief

Courtesy the artist/John Baldessari Studio

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 11:14 am

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Health & Happiness
1:10 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

How Healthy Is Seattle?

Source: 2012 State of Well-Being report: Washington
Credit Gallup-Healthways, 2012

What is well-being? How do you measure it? And how do Seattle and Washington state measure up in terms of healthy behaviors and happy outlook?

Ross Reynolds talked to Dr. Carter Coberley, vice president of Health Research and Outcomes at Healthways Center in Franklin, Tennessee, about a social-measurement index that goes beyond the gross domestic product or the Dow Jones Industrial average.

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Airline Safety
11:57 am
Fri March 8, 2013

TSA Relaxation On Sharp Objects Gets Criticism From Airline Workers

Baseball bats will be permitted in carry-on baggage starting in April.
Credit Flickr Photo/Todd Lappin

TSA Administrator John Pistole has announced a change to the Prohibited Items List. Starting April 25 of this year, passengers can now include in their carry-on luggage some previously banned items such as small knives and bats. Pilot and air marshal unions have come out against the relaxation of the TSA's ban on sharp objects. Ross Reynolds talks with airline workers and frequent fliers about their thoughts on the TSA announcement. 

News Savvy
11:55 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Conversation News Quiz!

Have you been paying attention to The Conversation? Ross Reynolds tests the retention of one lucky Conversation listener in the weekly news quiz.

Political News
11:53 am
Fri March 8, 2013

This Week In Olympia With Austin Jenkins

Ross Reynolds talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the latest legislative action on education, environment, guns and the death penalty.

Gun Control
11:43 am
Fri March 8, 2013

States With The Most Gun-Control Laws Have Fewest Gun-Related Deaths

"Non-Violence" sculpture by Fredrik Reuterswärd at the United Nations in New York City.
Credit Flickr Photo/Sari Dennise

States with the most gun control laws have the fewest gun-related deaths, according to a study published this week in the medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Researchers found that states with the most laws have a mortality rate 42 percent lower than those states with the fewest. So how does Washington state compare? Ross Reynolds talks with the lead researcher from Boston Children’s Hospital, Dr. Eric Fleegler.

News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Your Take On The News

It’s Friday — time to review the week’s news with Knute Berger, Eli Sanders and C.R. Douglas. Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn and City Attorney Pete Holmes clash over police reform. Seattle Public Schools comes under federal review over a racial disparity in how it disciplines students. Washington state floats sending its Hanford nuclear waste to New Mexico. And one week after sequestration, spending cuts caused by failure to reach a budget deal begin to make an impact in Washington state. What’s your take on the news? Call us at 206.543.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

Musical Performance
9:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Singer-Songwriter Shelby Earl Live In Studio

Shelby Earl performing at Neumos in 2011.
Credit Photo Credit/Dave Lichterman For KEXP

Seattle singer-songwriter Shelby Earl released her debut album, the folk-rock "Burn the Boats," in 2011. Since then she’s been touring and working on her second album, due out this year. She stops by the studio to play a few songs ahead of her trip to Austin's South by Southwest festival.

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Tragedy
7:06 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Coroner: Zoo Intern May Have Been Killed After Lion Lifted Cage Handle

An undated photo of Dianna Hanson provided by her brother, Paul Hanson.
Paul Hanson Associated Press

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 9:19 am

A woman killed by a 550-pound male lion at a conservancy near Fresno, Calif., earlier this week may have been caught by surprise after the animal escaped its cage, investigators say.

According to a preliminary autopsy, Dianna Hanson, a 24-year-old intern for Cat Haven, was killed Wednesday when the lion snapped her neck.

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Employment
6:23 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Pleasant Surprises: 236,000 Jobs Added; Jobless Rate Dips To 7.7 Percent

The scene at a job fair in Manhattan earlier this month.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 6:54 am

There were 236,000 jobs added to payrolls in February — many more than expected — and the jobless rate unexpectedly dropped by two-tenths of a point, to 7.7 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday.

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Lightning Talks
8:00 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Five Minutes Onstage At Ignite Seattle

Ignite Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Randy Stewart

If you had five minutes on stage, what would you say? That's the premise of Ignite Seattle, a regular worldwide event where presenters get five minutes and 20 slides to get a point across. Speakers at this month's event touch on a variety of topics, including viral videos, online dating and how to give up cheese. Ignite Seattle 19 took place at Town Hall on February 20, 2013.

The talk was moderated by The Seattle Times columnist Monica Guzman.

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Scientific Discoveries
2:04 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

If Caffeine Can Boost The Memory Of Bees, Can It Help Us, Too?

Adam Cole/NPR iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 3:13 pm

Who knew that the flower nectar of citrus plants — including some varieties of grapefruit, lemon and oranges — contains caffeine? As does the nectar of coffee plant flowers.

And when honeybees feed on caffeine-containing nectar, it turns out, the caffeine buzz seems to improve their memories — or their motivations for going back for more.

"It is surprising," says Geraldine Wright at Newcastle University in the the U.K., the lead researcher of a new honeybee study published in the journal Science.

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After The Filibuster
12:57 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Senate Approves Nomination Of John Brennan As CIA Chief

John Brennan testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee in Washington, on February 7, 2013.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

After an epic filibuster by Sen. Rand Paul that lasted into the early morning hours, the Senate voted this afternoon to confirm the nomination of John Brennan as the country's next Central Intelligence Agency director.

As we reported, Paul, a Republican from Kentucky, stood on the floor of the Senate for nearly 13 hours, repeatedly asking for an explanation of the Obama administration's targeted killing program.

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