More from KUOW

Musical Performance
9:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Singer-Songwriter Shelby Earl Live In Studio

Shelby Earl performing at Neumos in 2011.
Credit Photo Credit/Dave Lichterman For KEXP

Seattle singer-songwriter Shelby Earl released her debut album, the folk-rock "Burn the Boats," in 2011. Since then she’s been touring and working on her second album, due out this year. She stops by the studio to play a few songs ahead of her trip to Austin's South by Southwest festival.

Read more
Tragedy
7:06 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Coroner: Zoo Intern May Have Been Killed After Lion Lifted Cage Handle

An undated photo of Dianna Hanson provided by her brother, Paul Hanson.
Paul Hanson Associated Press

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 9:19 am

A woman killed by a 550-pound male lion at a conservancy near Fresno, Calif., earlier this week may have been caught by surprise after the animal escaped its cage, investigators say.

According to a preliminary autopsy, Dianna Hanson, a 24-year-old intern for Cat Haven, was killed Wednesday when the lion snapped her neck.

Read more
Employment
6:23 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Pleasant Surprises: 236,000 Jobs Added; Jobless Rate Dips To 7.7 Percent

The scene at a job fair in Manhattan earlier this month.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 6:54 am

There were 236,000 jobs added to payrolls in February — many more than expected — and the jobless rate unexpectedly dropped by two-tenths of a point, to 7.7 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday.

Read more
Lightning Talks
8:00 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Five Minutes Onstage At Ignite Seattle

Ignite Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Randy Stewart

If you had five minutes on stage, what would you say? That's the premise of Ignite Seattle, a regular worldwide event where presenters get five minutes and 20 slides to get a point across. Speakers at this month's event touch on a variety of topics, including viral videos, online dating and how to give up cheese. Ignite Seattle 19 took place at Town Hall on February 20, 2013.

The talk was moderated by The Seattle Times columnist Monica Guzman.

Read more
Scientific Discoveries
2:04 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

If Caffeine Can Boost The Memory Of Bees, Can It Help Us, Too?

Adam Cole/NPR iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 3:13 pm

Who knew that the flower nectar of citrus plants — including some varieties of grapefruit, lemon and oranges — contains caffeine? As does the nectar of coffee plant flowers.

And when honeybees feed on caffeine-containing nectar, it turns out, the caffeine buzz seems to improve their memories — or their motivations for going back for more.

"It is surprising," says Geraldine Wright at Newcastle University in the the U.K., the lead researcher of a new honeybee study published in the journal Science.

Read more
After The Filibuster
12:57 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Senate Approves Nomination Of John Brennan As CIA Chief

John Brennan testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee in Washington, on February 7, 2013.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

After an epic filibuster by Sen. Rand Paul that lasted into the early morning hours, the Senate voted this afternoon to confirm the nomination of John Brennan as the country's next Central Intelligence Agency director.

As we reported, Paul, a Republican from Kentucky, stood on the floor of the Senate for nearly 13 hours, repeatedly asking for an explanation of the Obama administration's targeted killing program.

Read more
Self-Defense
11:55 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Should You Defend Or Avoid? Ask The Self-Defense Expert

Joanne Factor, founder of Strategic Living and self-defense expert.
Strategic Living's Twitter account

The Seattle Police Department reports that there were 2,022 instances of aggravated assault and 1,329 robberies on record in Seattle in 2012. Violent crimes in general have increased on the national level by 4 percent between 2011 and 2012. We hear figures like this all the time, and they sometimes get us worrying about our own safety. What can an individual do to stay safe? Ross Reynolds talks with personal safety and self-defense expert, Joanne Factor about the best ways to reduce risk and stay safe.

Read more
Police Reform
10:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Connie Rice On Seattle Police Reform

Seattle Police on patrol.
Credit Flickr Photo/ Eric Peacock

A plan from the court-appointed monitor overseeing Seattle’s police reforms to address biased policing and excessive use of force within the SPD was overshadowed this week by a standoff between Mayor Mike McGinn and City Attorney Pete Holmes. The two argued publicly over who has authority to act on the city’s behalf. Yesterday, Mayor McGinn said he regretted the public argument and called for a pause. L.A.-based civil rights attorney Connie Rice is advising the mayor's office as the city moves forward on a consent decree with the Justice Department. We’ll speak with her about the work so far and what she calls a “quest for trust” in Seattle.

Read more
Politics
9:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Winning The White House In 2016

White House.
Credit Flickr Photo/Ivan Makarov

In an interview with Fox News earlier this week, Mitt Romney said that failing to reach minority voters was his biggest mistake of the 2012 campaign. What will it take to win the next election? UW Professor David Domke says winning over voters in so-called "carve-out states" — Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada — will be one key to victory. He joins us with rules of the road for winning the White House in 2016.

Read more
Amateur Astronomy
8:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

The Falling Star Catcher

A meteorite fragment.
Credit Flickr Photo/MarkGregory007

When someone says they have a hobby, that often means they spend their evenings knitting scarves, or their weekends restoring an old car. But Mike Hankey's hobby is a little more intense. He hunts meteorites. It’s a hobby that has him scouring gas station security videotapes, in hopes of glimpsing a shadow created by the meteor’s glare. It’s a hobby that has him interviewing scores of Amish teenagers and renting a house so he can live among them. The quest has consumed years of his life. But he still hasn’t found the dang thing.

To learn more about meteorites, visit the American Meteor Association's website.

Other stories on KUOW Presents, Thursday, March 7:

Read more
International Politics
7:57 am
Thu March 7, 2013

U.N. Security Council Approves New Sanctions On North Korea

U.N. Security Council members vote to adopt sanctions against North Korea on Thursday.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 9:54 am

The U.N. Security Council unanimously approved tough new sanctions on North Korea just hours after Pyongyang threatened a pre-emptive nuclear strike against the United States and its allies.

The Security Council's actions to clamp down on the North's nuclear program follow the country's third nuclear test, carried out last month in defiance of previous United Nations' sanctions.

The 15-0 Security Council vote Thursday includes China, which has backed North Korea in the past and is one of the country's few allies.

Read more
Natural History
2:29 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Fossils Suggest Giant Relatives Of Modern Camels Roamed The Canadian Arctic

Illustration of the High Arctic camel on Ellesmere Island during the Pliocene warm period, aboutthree-and-a-half million years ago. The camels lived in a boreal-type forest. The habitat includeslarch trees and the depiction is based on records of plant fossils found at nearby fossil deposits.
Julius Csotonyi

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 8:49 am

Camels belong in the desert. That's what we've learned since grade school.

Today, NPR's Melissa Block talked to Natalia Rybczynski, a paleobiologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature, who tells Melissa that fossils she has unearthed tell a different story.

The fossils, found on a frigid ridge in Canada's High Arctic, show that modern camels actually come from giant relatives that roamed the forests of Ellesmere Island 3.5 million years ago.

Read more
Transportation
11:55 am
Wed March 6, 2013

An Exit Interview With WSDOT Head Paula Hammond

Washington state Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond addresses a news conference of the Western Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Tuesday, July 14, 2009.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

This Friday will be Washington Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond's last day on the job after 30 years with the state department of transportation. Ross Reynolds sits down with Paula Hammond to discuss her work as the head of the department, what it was like to lead an agency of 7,200 employees, the future of Washington transportation and her legacy. 

Education
11:53 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Governor Announces Charter School Commission Appointments

Last November, voters approved Initiative 1240 to establish charter schools in Washington state and today the governor announced who is going to sit on the commission that will review and approve charter schools applications. Ross Reynolds sits down with newly appointed commission member and former Seattle School Board member Steve Sundquist about how the commission will work.

Hearing Disability
11:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Speak Up: 50 Million Americans Are Having Trouble Hearing You

Cover of 'Shouting Won't Help' by Katherine Bouton.

Helen Keller said that, "Blindness cuts us off from things, but deafness cuts us off from people." Ross Reynolds discusses the malady currently affecting 50 million Americans with The New York Times and New Yorker writer Katherine Bouton, author of "Shouting Won't Help."

Pages