More from KUOW

Impact Of War
12:51 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Four-Legged Warriors Show Signs Of PTSD

Bernie Green is a supervisor with the Department of Defense's Military Working Dog Breeding Program. Experts say dogs can suffer from PTSD-like conditions that can affect their military capabilities later on.
Ryan Loyd KSTX

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:04 pm

For years, PTSD — or post-traumatic stress disorder — has been an issue for military members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

But humans aren't the only ones with problems. Military dogs returning from war zones are also showing signs of PTSD. And there's evidence that these canines need some extra tender loving care after their tours of duty.

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Technology
12:14 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work And Think

Server rack
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane

"Big data" refers to our ability to analyze vast quantities of information to come to surprising conclusions. What’s the promise of big data, and what about our privacy? Ross Reynolds talk about the new book, "Big Data" with one of the books co-authors, Kenneth Cukier about the promise and possible perils of big data.

Port Of Seattle
12:11 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

President Of The Port Talks Future Plans, Possible Raises

Port of Seattle offices
Flickr Photo/· Steve ·

Should the Seattle Port Commissioners get a raise? Before you answer, consider the fact that the Port of Seattle owns and operates the nation’s 6th busiest US seaport. It also operates Sea-Tac International Airport — the nation’s 17th busiest. And the Port runs a four-passenger cruise terminal that saw around 800,000 passengers in 2011. Ross Reynolds talks with Tom Albro, the president of the Seattle Port Commission. Alboro has served on and chaired the Audit Committee and co-chaired the Century Agenda committee. His areas of focus as a port commissioner include promoting regional job and business growth, maintaining the urban industrial base, economic development and reducing the port’s environmental footprint. Tom Albro is also a trained civil engineer, owner and president of Seattle Monorail Services, which operates the Seattle Monorail, and is the former chairman of the Municipal League of King County.

Gender Politics
12:04 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

India’s Shifting Gender Roles: One Girl’s Tale

A young girl (not the one featured in this story) prays in Rishkesh, India
Credit flickr/saitomo

What began as widespread protests in response to a brutal gang rape have evolved into a movement. Its object is to change the way women are treated in India. PRI's Rhitu Chatterjee  profiles one girl who seems to represent where girls in India have been - and where they're heading.

Other stories on KUOW Presents, Monday, March 11:

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Online Communities
11:01 am
Mon March 11, 2013

The 'Nasty Effect': How Comments Color Comprehension

Researchers found that exposure to uncivil comments can polarize opinion on news issues.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 2:56 pm

At its best, the Web is a place for unlimited exchange of ideas. But Web-savvy news junkies have known for a long time that reader feedback can often turn nasty. Now a study in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication suggests that rude comments on articles can even change the way we interpret the news.

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Seattle Mayoral Race
10:00 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Ron Sims And The Seattle Mayoral Race

Ron Sims in his former role as King County executive at the press conference that announced that President Obama nominated him to be deputy secretary of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development in 2009.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Former King County Executive Ron Sims has retired from his position as deputy secretary for the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. Will he join the race to be Seattle’s next mayor? He joins us to answer that question.  

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Global Fish Market
9:21 am
Mon March 11, 2013

International Convention Moves To Limit Shark 'Finning' Trade

Indonesian fishermen unload their catch, including sharks and baby sharks, in Lampulo fish market in Banda Aceh last week.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 11:33 am

Delegates to an international species conservation conference in Bangkok, Thailand, this week have agreed to limit the trade of shark fins and meat.

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that government representatives to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, have agreed to put the porbeagle, oceanic whitetip, three kinds of hammerhead shark and two kinds of manta ray on its Appendix II list, which places restrictions on fishing but still allows limited trade.

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Seattle Politics
9:00 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Ask Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn
Credit Courtesy/City of Seattle

Last week, court-appointed monitor Merrick Bobb submitted his first-year plan for reforming the Seattle Police Department. On Friday, Mayor Mike McGinn accepted the plan, saying there's a mutual understanding that it's a living document that can be amended. Meanwhile, the Seattle Police Department is rolling out software that it claims will help predict where crimes are likely to occur. What's the proof that it works? Have a question for the mayor? Call us at 800.289.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

Art & Design
4:23 am
Mon March 11, 2013

For John Baldessari, Conceptual Art Means Serious Mischief

Courtesy the artist/John Baldessari Studio

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 11:14 am

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Health & Happiness
1:10 pm
Fri March 8, 2013

How Healthy Is Seattle?

Source: 2012 State of Well-Being report: Washington
Credit Gallup-Healthways, 2012

What is well-being? How do you measure it? And how do Seattle and Washington state measure up in terms of healthy behaviors and happy outlook?

Ross Reynolds talked to Dr. Carter Coberley, vice president of Health Research and Outcomes at Healthways Center in Franklin, Tennessee, about a social-measurement index that goes beyond the gross domestic product or the Dow Jones Industrial average.

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Airline Safety
11:57 am
Fri March 8, 2013

TSA Relaxation On Sharp Objects Gets Criticism From Airline Workers

Baseball bats will be permitted in carry-on baggage starting in April.
Credit Flickr Photo/Todd Lappin

TSA Administrator John Pistole has announced a change to the Prohibited Items List. Starting April 25 of this year, passengers can now include in their carry-on luggage some previously banned items such as small knives and bats. Pilot and air marshal unions have come out against the relaxation of the TSA's ban on sharp objects. Ross Reynolds talks with airline workers and frequent fliers about their thoughts on the TSA announcement. 

News Savvy
11:55 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Conversation News Quiz!

Have you been paying attention to The Conversation? Ross Reynolds tests the retention of one lucky Conversation listener in the weekly news quiz.

Political News
11:53 am
Fri March 8, 2013

This Week In Olympia With Austin Jenkins

Ross Reynolds talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the latest legislative action on education, environment, guns and the death penalty.

Gun Control
11:43 am
Fri March 8, 2013

States With The Most Gun-Control Laws Have Fewest Gun-Related Deaths

"Non-Violence" sculpture by Fredrik Reuterswärd at the United Nations in New York City.
Credit Flickr Photo/Sari Dennise

States with the most gun control laws have the fewest gun-related deaths, according to a study published this week in the medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Researchers found that states with the most laws have a mortality rate 42 percent lower than those states with the fewest. So how does Washington state compare? Ross Reynolds talks with the lead researcher from Boston Children’s Hospital, Dr. Eric Fleegler.

News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri March 8, 2013

Your Take On The News

It’s Friday — time to review the week’s news with Knute Berger, Eli Sanders and C.R. Douglas. Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn and City Attorney Pete Holmes clash over police reform. Seattle Public Schools comes under federal review over a racial disparity in how it disciplines students. Washington state floats sending its Hanford nuclear waste to New Mexico. And one week after sequestration, spending cuts caused by failure to reach a budget deal begin to make an impact in Washington state. What’s your take on the news? Call us at 206.543.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

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