More from KUOW

Politics
9:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Winning The White House In 2016

White House.
Credit Flickr Photo/Ivan Makarov

In an interview with Fox News earlier this week, Mitt Romney said that failing to reach minority voters was his biggest mistake of the 2012 campaign. What will it take to win the next election? UW Professor David Domke says winning over voters in so-called "carve-out states" — Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada — will be one key to victory. He joins us with rules of the road for winning the White House in 2016.

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Amateur Astronomy
8:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

The Falling Star Catcher

A meteorite fragment.
Credit Flickr Photo/MarkGregory007

When someone says they have a hobby, that often means they spend their evenings knitting scarves, or their weekends restoring an old car. But Mike Hankey's hobby is a little more intense. He hunts meteorites. It’s a hobby that has him scouring gas station security videotapes, in hopes of glimpsing a shadow created by the meteor’s glare. It’s a hobby that has him interviewing scores of Amish teenagers and renting a house so he can live among them. The quest has consumed years of his life. But he still hasn’t found the dang thing.

To learn more about meteorites, visit the American Meteor Association's website.

Other stories on KUOW Presents, Thursday, March 7:

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International Politics
7:57 am
Thu March 7, 2013

U.N. Security Council Approves New Sanctions On North Korea

U.N. Security Council members vote to adopt sanctions against North Korea on Thursday.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 9:54 am

The U.N. Security Council unanimously approved tough new sanctions on North Korea just hours after Pyongyang threatened a pre-emptive nuclear strike against the United States and its allies.

The Security Council's actions to clamp down on the North's nuclear program follow the country's third nuclear test, carried out last month in defiance of previous United Nations' sanctions.

The 15-0 Security Council vote Thursday includes China, which has backed North Korea in the past and is one of the country's few allies.

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Natural History
2:29 pm
Wed March 6, 2013

Fossils Suggest Giant Relatives Of Modern Camels Roamed The Canadian Arctic

Illustration of the High Arctic camel on Ellesmere Island during the Pliocene warm period, aboutthree-and-a-half million years ago. The camels lived in a boreal-type forest. The habitat includeslarch trees and the depiction is based on records of plant fossils found at nearby fossil deposits.
Julius Csotonyi

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 8:49 am

Camels belong in the desert. That's what we've learned since grade school.

Today, NPR's Melissa Block talked to Natalia Rybczynski, a paleobiologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature, who tells Melissa that fossils she has unearthed tell a different story.

The fossils, found on a frigid ridge in Canada's High Arctic, show that modern camels actually come from giant relatives that roamed the forests of Ellesmere Island 3.5 million years ago.

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Transportation
11:55 am
Wed March 6, 2013

An Exit Interview With WSDOT Head Paula Hammond

Washington state Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond addresses a news conference of the Western Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials Tuesday, July 14, 2009.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

This Friday will be Washington Transportation Secretary Paula Hammond's last day on the job after 30 years with the state department of transportation. Ross Reynolds sits down with Paula Hammond to discuss her work as the head of the department, what it was like to lead an agency of 7,200 employees, the future of Washington transportation and her legacy. 

Education
11:53 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Governor Announces Charter School Commission Appointments

Last November, voters approved Initiative 1240 to establish charter schools in Washington state and today the governor announced who is going to sit on the commission that will review and approve charter schools applications. Ross Reynolds sits down with newly appointed commission member and former Seattle School Board member Steve Sundquist about how the commission will work.

Hearing Disability
11:45 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Speak Up: 50 Million Americans Are Having Trouble Hearing You

Cover of 'Shouting Won't Help' by Katherine Bouton.

Helen Keller said that, "Blindness cuts us off from things, but deafness cuts us off from people." Ross Reynolds discusses the malady currently affecting 50 million Americans with The New York Times and New Yorker writer Katherine Bouton, author of "Shouting Won't Help."

Tech Culture
11:26 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Spring Break For Geeks: SXSW Interactive Starts Friday

At SXSW 2012, the app "Highlight" was touted but failed to break out like Foursquare or Twitter in years prior.
Jack Plunkett AP

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 12:01 pm

Every year, the South By Southwest music, film and interactive festival gets larger, and navigating the blur of panels, parties and shows gets more daunting. The girth of it all is enough to keep many SXSW old-timers away from Austin this year.

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Legacy Of War
10:30 am
Wed March 6, 2013

After Saddam

A mosque in Halabja, Kurdish region of Iraq.
Credit Joshua McNichols

Anxiety. Regret. But also happiness and hope. These are the emotions experienced by Iraqis as they try to find stability and safety for their families in post-Saddam Iraq. The BBC’s Hugh Sykes has reported on some horrific scenes in Iraq. Now, he returns to Iraq to reflect. And to try to understand how it is the Iraqis can, having seen so much, be so filled with laughter.

More stories from KUOW Presents, Wednesday, March 6:

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Business News
10:00 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce: Disney's Oz Prequel And NW Business News

Canadian flag.
Credit Flickr Photo/Arlo Bates

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton has a look at what's happening at the movies. Then, Michele Matassa Flores wraps up the region's recent economic news.

Science & Space
9:00 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Neil deGrasse Tyson: Let's Think Big About Space

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.
Credit Courtesy/Neil deGrasse Tyson Facebook Page

What does the future hold for America’s space program? Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson argues that space exploration is vital for our economy, our security — and our morale. "Audacious visions... have the power to change assumptions about what is possible," he says. In his most recent book, "Space Chronicles," Tyson challenges lawmakers to invest in NASA and once again put a priority on the nation's space program. Neil deGrasse Tyson joins us to talk meteors, aliens and thinking big about exploring the universe.

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Technology Policy
7:51 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Why The Library Of Congress Has A Lock On Your Phone

A law designed to protect copyrights on music and movies put digital locks on all sorts of things.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 8:56 am

What it means to own something in the digital age is being re-negotiated.

Few of us own the music we listen to or the movies we watch in exactly the same way we did a decade ago. And today if you buy a smartphone from a cellphone company, what you can legally do with it — how and where you can use it — may be proscribed even if that phone is fully bought and paid for.

I keep a lot of music on my phone. I have the Stones, Janis Joplin and OK Go.

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Remembrances
2:13 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Venezuela's Chavez: An Outsized Personality, A Domineering Figure

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez speaks in a televised address in January 2002 at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas. Chavez vowed justice for two men who were shot and killed Jan. 3 at a political rally in a battle between Chavez supporters, opposition marchers and security forces.
Miraflores/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 3:20 pm

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Environment
12:54 pm
Tue March 5, 2013

Bullitt Center: A Building That Functions Like An Organism

The Bullitt Center on Madison Avenue in Capitol Hill.
John Stamets

This Thursday the Bullitt Foundation moves into their new offices on Capitol Hill — a brand new building they’re touting as the greenest in the world. The Bullitt Center is a “living building” that will generate all its own electricity and water. Last week the head of the Bullitt Foundation and coordinator of the first Earth Day, Denis Hayes, took Ross Reynolds and his crew on a tour of the Bullitt Center.

The Bullitt Center grand opening is April 22, 2013 — Earth Day.

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Washington State Newspapers
11:54 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Chances Are High That This Canadian Company Owns Your Local Paper

What's the future of the Seattle Weekly under its new ownership?
Flickr Photo/Jason Taellious

With the purchase of the Seattle Weekly and the Everett Herald, Sound Publishing now owns more newspapers in Washington than any other publisher. Ross Reynolds talks with Black Press Ltd. CEO Rick O'Connor about the future of newspapers in Washington state.

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