More from KUOW

Military Tactics
10:45 am
Fri March 15, 2013

NPR Special: Iraq War

An exhibit on the National Mall, Washington, DC, with boots representing soldiers killed in Iraq. May 2006.
Flickr Photo/H Dragon

Coming up on Spotlight, March 18 at 8 p.m.

Ten years ago, a US-led invasion brushed aside Iraq's army and toppled the country’s long-time leader, Saddam Hussein.  The swift military operation quickly became a difficult and complicated occupation. The US found itself fighting an insurgency, and a sectarian conflict nearly consumed the country.

Read more
News & Analysis
10:00 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Your Take On The News

It's Friday — time to review the week's top news stories with Knute Berger, Eli Sanders and C.R. Douglas. A federal judge approved a first-year plan to reform the Seattle Police Department. Meanwhile, the plan was challenged in court by the Seattle Police Officer's Guild and the Seattle Police Management Association, over concerns about collective bargaining rights.

Also, a bill that would expand background checks for gun owners died in the state House. And the state's budget shortfall grew by $300 million. What stories were you following this week? Call us at 800.289.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org.

Government Stimulus
9:00 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Was The TARP Bailout A Failure?

Did the TARP bailout fund help you during the 2008 financial crash?
Flickr Photo/Taber Andrew Bain

Why didn’t the TARP bailout fund help the small businesses and homeowners who were slammed by the 2008 financial crash? Neil Barofsky left his job at the US Attorney’s Office in New York to become special inspector general in charge of overseeing the bailout money. He says, from his first days on the job he was met with hostility from the treasury officials overseeing the TARP fund. He charges that Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner funneled money to Wall Street firms in ways that bordered on corruption. Neil Barofsky joins us with the inside story.

Read more
Historical Memoir
8:00 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Early Recollections Of Prague And War With Madeleine Albright

Former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright at an interactive session on "America, India and Democracy in the 21st Century" in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2006.
Credit AP Photo/Gurinder Osan

Madeleine Albright was the first woman to hold the Secretary of State position for former president Bill Clinton. She became known as an advocate for peace in the Middle East and for bringing war criminals to justice. In her new memoir, she chronicles her traumatic early life in Prague during the Nazi occupation, through the end of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War.

Read more
Public Views
12:28 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

What Iconic Seattle Views Should Be Protected?

Proposed zoning changes in South Lake Union would obstruct the view of the Space Needle from Lake Union Park.
Space Needle Corp. Courtesy Photo

New construction in South Lake Union would block the view of the Space Needle from a park. What views from public places are protected? What Seattle sites are considered so important there are rules to keep them from being blocked? Should there be more?

Ross Reynolds talks with the director of Seattle's Department of Planning and Development Marshall Foster and tries to see the bigger picture when it comes to public views.

Employment Future
12:13 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Will Your Job Be Terminated By A Robot?

The helpful robotic vacuum. The cat is not so convinced.
Flickr Photo/Eirik Newth

Earlier this year IBM’s supercomputer, Watson, took a job with health care company WellPoint. Watson isn’t the only robot taking our jobs. By the end of the century, an estimated 70 percent of current occupations will be replaced by automation. Digital labor will take over assembly lines, write articles and even give legal advice. Where will that leave humans? 

Read more
Interview
12:10 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Nick Offerman Both Is And Isn't Ron Swanson

Actor Nick Offerman from "Parks & Recreation." Taken Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012.
AP Photo/Carlo Allegri/Invision

Nick Offerman plays Ron Swanson, the libertarian government official on the TV show Parks and Recreation. Ross Reynolds talks to actor Nick Offerman about libertarianism, Hempfest, acting and cupcakes — kind of.

Real Estate Development
10:00 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Rising Popularity Of Microhousing

Microhousing construction in Capitol Hill.
Credit Flickr Photo/Jseattle/Capitol Hill Seattle Blog

As the cost of living continues to rise in the city, people are finding it harder to find an affordable place to live. To accommodate the demand, developers are building microhousing -- tiny studio apartments with private bathrooms that share a kitchen with other units. The microhouses boast affordable living in high-demand neighborhoods such as Capitol Hill and the University District. However, residents in some neighborhoods fear the developments skirt zoning laws and create too much density too fast. City Councilmember Tom Rasmussen is considering legislation that could put new restrictions on microhousing. He joins us to explain.

Read more
Religion
9:00 am
Thu March 14, 2013

The New Pope: Jorge Bergoglio Of Argentina

A sign in Italian reading "Hail to the Pope" is held up after the election of Pope Francis I, the 266th pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church, in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 13, 2013. Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina was elected pope.
Credit AP Photo/Angelo Carconi

As white smoke billowed from the Sistine Chapel yesterday, millions of Catholics around the world received  the 266th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church: Jorge Bergoglio of Argentina, who will be known as Pope Francis. He's the first pope from Latin America and the first from the Jesuit order. We'll get an account from reporter Tiffany Parks who was in St. Peters Square when he was elected. Also, we'll talk with Father Stephen Sundborg, president of Seattle University.

Read more
Parenting
8:00 am
Thu March 14, 2013

If You Want To Date Me, You'll Have To Submit An Application To My Mom

A mother spider protects her young. See? It's only natural!
Credit Flickr/ Olivier M Roland

Peggy was a profiler, by trade. Sometimes, for her work, she had to judge someone’s character in under two minutes. She’d practiced that skill for 26 years.

When she was home, her daughter Liza would introduce Peggy to the boys she was dating at the time. Peggy would size them up, and immediately make a judgment. But Peggy differed from other mothers in an important way: She was always right.

That realization led Liza to embrace her mother’s special skills. And the two of them teamed up together, in a very public way, to find Liza the right guy.

Other stories from KUOW Presents, Thursday, March 14:

Read more
Humanizing Iraq
2:00 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

After Saddam, Part Two: Return To Basra

Children in Basra.
Credit Flickr/ taimambi

Hugh Sykes has covered Iraq for the BBC since 2003. In that time, he’s had to maintain a journalist’s distance. In part two of this special documentary, he returns to Basra and visits many of the Iraqis he met as a war correspondent.

From the opening chorus of frogs in a swamp (Saddam’s dams having been breached like those on the Elwha river), to the closing regrets of a young woman who cannot walk the streets alone, the journalist's deep connection to these people shines through and helps us understand how someone could love a place like Basra.

Other Stories on KUOW Presents, Wednesday, March 13:

Read more
Inventions
12:12 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

Shining Light On The Age Of Edison

An original carbon-filament Edison lightbulb from 1879.
Flickr Photo/terren in Virginia

When Thomas Edison displayed the first lightbulbs the reaction was utter amazement. University of Tennessee history professor Ernest Freeberg talks with Ross Reynolds about how Edison’s wonder invented modern America.

Religion
12:00 pm
Wed March 13, 2013

What Are Your Hopes For The Next Pope?

Yesterday, black smoke rose from the chimney in Rome indicating that the cardinals could not decide on a pope in the first go round. Today, white smoke has risen, indicating that a new pope has been chosen. What are you hoping for from the next head of the Catholic Church? Ross Reynolds talks with listeners about their hopes for the next pope.

News & Culture
10:00 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce: Coal Ports And Movie Direction

Coal transport by train.
Credit Flickr Photo/Ryan Sitzman

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. And it turns out Canada doesn’t want a coal port either. Then, film critic Robert Horton asks the question: What does it mean when something is “directed” in a movie? Also, Seattle Times economy columnist Jon Talton explores how the sequester cuts will affect our local economy.   

Police Reform
9:00 am
Wed March 13, 2013

Monitor Merrick Bobb's Plan For Seattle Police Reform

Seattle Police patrol cars.
Credit Flickr Photo/Brittney Bollay

Tuesday, a federal judge approved a plan to reform Seattle's Police Department. This comes a day after the Seattle Police Officers Guild and Seattle Police Management Association filed a court challenge to the plan, raising concerns about the collective bargaining rights of police officers. We'll talk with independent monitor Merrick Bobb and senior police expert Joe Brann about the details of the reform plan.

Read more

Pages