More from KUOW

Legalizing It
3:27 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

The 'Known Unknowns' Of Regulating Legalized Marijuana

Both Washington and Colorado have passed measures legalizing marijuana. Here in Washington, the Washington State Liquor Control Board is busy hammering out how marijuana will be grown, sold, and regulated. But there are still many questions, from how the federal government will respond to a legal weed market, how to monitor marijuana potency, how to effectively measuring and enforcing marijuana impairment levels in drivers.

For answers, KUOW’s Steve Scher talked with Thomas McLellan, Ph.D. He’s CEO and co-founder of the Treatment Research Institute, and is an internationally known substance abuse researcher and public policy expert. Most recently, he served as deputy director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy under the Obama-Biden administration, where he was heavily involved in health care reform.

Interview has been edited for clarity.

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Science & Technology
2:06 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Forensic Advances Raise New Questions About Old Convictions

After a forensic dentist used software to correct a distortion in the image a decade later, the original expert witness recanted his testimony.
Courtesy of Jan Stiglitz

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 4:48 pm

Advances in forensic technology are showing that what used to be considered clear-cut proof of guilt may be nothing of the kind. A California case highlights a growing problem facing courts: what to do when an expert witness changes his mind because of better science and technology.

William Richards was convicted of brutally murdering his wife and is serving 25 years to life. The evidence against him was mostly circumstantial and two different juries were unable to reach a verdict. A third trial was aborted because the judge recused himself.

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Crowd Sourcing Labor
12:04 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

What In The World Is Turkopticon?

Flickr Photo/Matt Wetzler

When we think of crowd sourcing, we often think about Wikipedia or Youtube, but  Amazon's Mechanical Turk is a different type of crowd sourcing.

Mechanical Turk is an online marketplace where employers can hire thousands of workers to complete tiny tasks such as identifying objects in a photo or editing a description.  Workers are offered no benefits and are not protected by minimum wage laws. They are paid per task, often as little as 20 cents, occasionally as much as $5. But sometimes, they aren’t paid at all.

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Gun Control
11:59 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Restraining Orders And Guns: What Does One Have To Do With The Other?

Who should surrender firearms in Washington state?
Flickr Photo/Sari Dennise

In Washington state people convicted of crimes are required to surrender their firearms to law enforcement officials.  But people with restraining orders against them – even in cases where there are serious threats of domestic violence – almost never have to give up their guns.  Ross Reynolds talks with Kirkland Democrat Roger Goodman about his proposal to change that.

Airport Wages
11:55 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Are Sea-Tac Workers Paid Fairly? New Report Says No

A report by Puget Sound Sage says Sea-Tac employees are not fairly compensated.
Flickr Photo/ellenm1

Puget Sound Sage's latest report finds that Sea-Tac Airport has fallen behind when it comes to minimum worker pay when compared to some other West Coast airports.

How do Sea-Tac's wages compare to the national average, and if workers at the airport were to get raises who would bear the brunt of that cost? Ross Reynolds talks with Puget Sound Sage researcher and policy analyst Nicole Keenan.

Immigration Reform
11:53 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Across The Border And Under The Table: Tales Of Undocumented Workers

Helen Davis of the Support Center in Omak works closely with the workers who pick fruit in the orchards outside of Brewster, Wash.
N3 Photo/Jessica Robinson

Who are the undocumented workers? Ross Reynolds sits down with KUOW's Liz Jones to discuss immigration policy and hear stories from undocumented workers in the region.

News & Analysis
10:00 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Vaughn Palmer in the KUOW studio.
Credit KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada, film critic Robert Horton looks at what's happening at the movies, and Geekwire's Todd Bishop reviews the latest in tech.

Social Change
9:15 am
Wed March 20, 2013

A Gay Catholic Priest Fights For Position In Church

Rosary beads.
Credit Flickr Photo/Michal

Father Bernard Lynch says there’s no vow in which Catholic priests promise not to be gay. But that didn’t make Lynch's life any easier. He and other gay and lesbian Catholics in New York City had to hold their own Eucharist (communion) in secret in another church.

It wasn’t until the AIDS crisis, when people suffering from emergent disease couldn’t get comfort from the church, that Bernard discovered why he’d remained a priest through all those years of adversity.

Other stories on KUOW Presents, Wednesday, March 20:

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Science Education
9:00 am
Wed March 20, 2013

NPR's Ira Flatow: Science Is Sexy

NPR science correspondent Ira Flatow.
Credit Courtesy Ira Flatow

Is science sexy? Public radio and TV journalist Ira Flatow thinks so. Every week, he turns scientific discoveries into conversation pieces on his radio program Science Friday. In his talk “Science is Sexy,” he argues that museums, zoos, TV shows and films have overtaken formal education as the main ways people learn about science. Whether it’s the Mars rover or the Large Hadron Collider, scientific research is a hot commodity. Is popular science good for science as a whole?

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Surveillance
12:07 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Big Brother Is Watching, But Do You Really Care?

What are your thoughts about having cameras in public spaces?
Eugene Gorny

Yesterday the Seattle City Council unanimously passed legislation to require city departments to obtain council approval before acquiring and installing certain surveillance equipment. How do you feel about cameras in public spaces? Ross Reynolds talks with listeners about the pros and cons of having big brother watch us.

Listener Comments
12:05 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

What Seattle Had To Say About The Iraq War In 2003

Ten years ago today President George W. Bush announced the war on Iraq had begun. On that day Ross Reynolds asked listeners if they were in the military or part of a military family, and what they thought about the then-fresh announcement of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Today on The Conversation we play for you our listener reactions to the announcement of the war in Iraq. 

Spring Cleaning
12:00 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Training Your Brain To Have A Composed Domain

Where do you start your spring cleaning?
Flickr Photo/Sheila Y

It’s not officially spring, but we are only 24 hours away! Sure for some spring means blooming flowers, chirping birds and if we are lucky, warmer weather. But there is another thing that many people associate with spring — cleaning. But where do you start? How do you tackle that pile of mail that has been multiplying like rabbits and is now taking over your desk? Is less, more? What is "bus-stop clutter"?

Economics
10:00 am
Tue March 19, 2013

The Power Of Emerging Economies

Emerging economies utilize global transport to move goods and stimulate exports. This particular ship is leaving Vancouver, Canada, passing under the Lion's Gate Bridge.
Credit Flickr Photo/Evan Leeson

In 2010, emerging economies accounted for almost 40 percent of the world's gross domestic product — twice as much as they did in 1990. Today, one in four Fortune 500 firms comes from emerging markets. How far can growth carry nations out of poverty and toward a strong economic foundation? We hear what the economic successes of developing countries can teach the developed world from Peter Blair Henry of NYU’s Stern School of Business.

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Military
9:00 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Remembering The Iraq War

Marine Corps' Lima Company pay tribute to fallen soldiers at Haditha Dam in Iraq.
Credit Flickr Photo/James McCauley

March 19, 2013 marks 10 years since the beginning of the war in Iraq. A total of 3,489 Americans died in combat during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Nearly another 32,000 were wounded in action. The numbers obscure the thousands of individual stories from the War in Iraq. We hear stories of those who fought, worked and died in the war.

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Space Habitats
8:00 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Designing Homes For Astronauts

An astronaut makes a zero-gravity space joke by pretending to balance colleague on a single finger.
Credit NASA

If an architect on planet earth wants to design a home, he or she must work with the same basic elements designers have used for centuries: floors, walls, and ceilings.

That all changed when designers began planning dwelling units for astronauts. In zero gravity, there’s no up, no down, no reason to distinguish floors from walls from ceilings! Every surface was a potential light source, dinner table (just add Velcro) or toilet (please don't mix them up). But the astronauts living in those spaces had a much different take on that design revolution.

It turns we need more than our basic biological needs met in order to feel comfortable. We need a view of the horizon, we need light overhead (like the sun) and we need the ritual of sitting down at a proper table to share a meal together. The more alien the environment, the more reminders we need of our humanity.

99% Invisible explores design for astronauts, today on KUOW Presents.

Other stories on KUOW Presents, Tuesday, March 19:

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