More from KUOW

Advertising
12:38 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Advergaming: The Unregulated World Of Marketing To Kids

Do you know the content of the games your kids play?
Flickr Photo/Seth Werkheiser

Regulation exits for television marketing aimed at children that mixes entertainment with advertising. That regulation does not exist for advergaming, a form of online entertainment that integrates advertising into a video game format.

These advergames are often targeted to children who at their age, have difficulty differentiating between advertising and other content.

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Altruism
12:33 pm
Tue April 23, 2013

Feeling Weighed Down By That Extra Kidney? Donate It!

Flickr Photo/Mika Marttila

The Mayo Clinic reports that around 45 percent of Americans say they are either very or somewhat likely to donate a kidney to someone they’ve never met. In 2001, that number was only 24 percent.

There are about 90,000 people in the US currently waiting for a kidney, and many others waiting for a different organ. Living donors are limited by what they can donate, either a kidney or small portion of a liver. Would you donate an organ?

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Social Issues
10:00 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Bellevue SWAT, Japanese Farm Food, And Greendays Gardening

What principles do you incorporate in your gardening?
Flickr Photo/Steve Wilson

Bellevue’s SWAT Team Comes To A Seattle Neighborhood
Columbia City residents heard Monday night from Seattle and Bellevue officials about a shooting involving Bellevue police that happened in Seattle late last month. According to KUOW’s Patricia Murphy, the Seattle Police Department is investigating the incident.

Japanese Farm Food
Nancy Singleton Hachisu moved from California to Japan intending to stay a year. Instead she fell in love with the culture, the food and a local farmer. Now — many years and three kids later — she lives on an organic farm in an 80-year-old traditional Japanese farmhouse. She writes about life, love and food in her cookbook "Japanese Farm Food."

Greendays Gardening Panel
Gardening is not just growing vegetables, pruning ornamentals or planting natives. Modern organic gardeners are trying to incorporate practices and aestheticism that works in any kind of garden. Our gardening panel is just the group to bring the ideas together this week and every week on KUOW. They answer your gardening questions live at 10:40 a.m. Call 206.543.5869 or email weekday@kuow.org.

International
9:00 am
Tue April 23, 2013

National Teacher Of The Year, Vali Nasr, And Being Bipolar

Vali Nasr speaking at World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, January 23, 2013.
Flickr Photo/World Economic Forum

2013 Teacher Of The Year
Jeff Charbonneau, a science teacher from Zillah, Washington, has been selected as 2013 National Teacher of the Year. He’ll share his wisdom and teaching style with us while en route to the White House for his award ceremony.

The Dispensable Nation
President Obama’s foreign policy emphasizes China and Asia instead of the Middle East and Europe. The administration is shifting military resources and diplomatic energy as China expands its global footprint. Former State Department Policy Advisor Vali Nasr says President Obama’s foreign policy is too cautious and a danger to the future peace and security of the planet.

What Is It Like To Be Bipolar? Part 2
What does it feel like to be bipolar? How does the mental illness affect family and relationships? What misunderstandings are held by the general public? Does a person who is bipolar consider themselves “crazy?” Author Janine Crowley Haynes considers these questions in her memoir "My Kind of Crazy: Living in a Bipolar World."

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

The Making Of An Activist
1:18 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Growing Up As Human Traffic

From Bangladesh (pictured below) to Grays Harbor County, Washington (pictured above), human trafficking is often closer than most of us realize.
Credit Flickr photo / Tiggywinkle

Yasmine Christopher was born in Bangladesh. Her dad was a white American, well educated and fairly wealthy. Her mom was a 14-year-old child bride who’d been raised on little more than a diet of a potato a day. Yasmine sensed that her parents were not equals — that her dad lorded his power over the rest of the family — but she didn’t realize how bad things were. Not until her extended family had followed her father to the United States.

They all moved to a small farm in Grays Harbor County, Washington. Her father had promised them all a better life there. When Yasmine was older, she’d finally recognize her family situation for what it was. She and her Bangladeshi relatives had been slaves. And her father was the master.

More stories from KUOW Presents, Monday, April 22, 2013:

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Ethics
11:28 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Should Companies Be Allowed To Not Consider Candidates Who Smoke?

Do smokers have protection under labor law?
Fetmano Flickr

In Washington state, it’s perfectly legal for employers to refuse to hire people who smoke. In 2006, state lawmakers tried but failed to join 29 other US states that made it illegal for employers to discriminate against smokers. 

According to the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries, it’s legal for companies to ban smokers from their workforce because smokers are not protected by any wrongful termination laws.

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Politics and Government
10:00 am
Mon April 22, 2013

News From Olympia, David Stockman, Covering Breaking News

Washington state capitol.
Credit Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova

This Week In Olympia
The legislative session is almost over but lots of issues remain unresolved. Education funding is still up in the air, so is an agreement on a balanced budget.  Jerry Cornfield, reporter and political columnist for the Everett Herald is waiting for answers along with the rest of us.
 

David Stockman Takes The American Economy To The Woodshed
In 1985,  federal budget Director David Stockman was sharply rebuked by his boss, Ronald Reagan, for saying the president’s tax programs were trickle-down programs to help the rich. These days, author David Stockman is taking Ben Bernanke, Wall Street Banks and the Obama administration to the woodshed for printing money, running deficits and leaving the gold standard.
 

The Media’s Boston Bomber Frenzy
CNN went on the air with misinformation about the imminent arrest of suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings. The front page of the New York Post identified the wrong men as suspects. Should audiences have any expectations for factual reporting during these fast moving stories? 

History
9:00 am
Mon April 22, 2013

DC Update, Media & History, Interfaith Amigos

The Washington, DC: Week In Review
What was it like to work in Washington, DC, last week? Lawmakers rejected all the gun control proposals despite testimony from Newtown parents. President Obama expressed his disappointment, calling it a "shameful day" for the country. Add to that, the contaminated letters and awful bombing in Boston. CBS News producer Jill Jackson brings us a week in review.

How Media Shapes History
Thousands of years ago, the development of writing gave power to writers. Today, the computer gives power to coders. William Bernstein chronicles the impacts technology has on human communication from its origins in Mesopotamia to our 21st century global society in his book, “Masters of the Word: How Media Shaped History.”

Interfaith Amigos: Ancient Texts In A Modern World
The Bible, the Torah and the Quran are ancient religious texts written for an ancient audience.  How do we adapt ancient teachings to a modern world? The Interfaith Amigos share their views.

Currency
8:00 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Rethinking The Idea Of Money

Rethinking money.
Credit Flickr Photos/Kevin Dooley

In the book "Rethinking Money," economist Bernard Lietaer and journalist Jacqui Dunne trace the beginnings of our monetary system, including its serious problems and hope for the future.

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Drunken Driving Laws
2:26 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Governor Inslee Pushes For Tougher DUI Penalties

Don't drink and drive.
Flickr Photo/Renee Silverman

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the average drunken driver has driven drunk 80 times before their first arrest. Here in Washington after a rather horrific spree of drunk driving related deaths, the governor is getting tough on drunken drivers by proposing tougher penalties for first-, second- and third-time offenders. One of the governor's more strident proposals would ban third-time offenders from purchasing alcohol. In this segment of the conversation listeners share their thoughts on these new and tougher proposed penalties.

Preventing Sexual Assault
2:25 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Sexual Assault Awareness: Going Beyond 'No Means No'

Approximately every two minutes, one woman will be raped in the United States. That means about 10 women will be raped by the end of this short 20 minute segment. Of those rapes over half will be committed by someone the victim knows, and the majority will go unreported. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and on the show today Ross spoke with Mary Ellen Stone, the executive director of King County Sexual Assault Resource Center about sexual assault. 

Reunited Family
12:44 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Canadian Mom Gets Her Missing Kids Back After 4 Years

Credit Flickr photo/ dcosand

If you ask school administrators what the greatest danger to children is, they’ll tell you: it’s not rogue shooters; it’s parents who abduct their own children in defiance of custody agreements.

That’s the realization Canadian Emily Cableck faced when her children’s biological father didn’t show up with the kids like he was supposed to. The awful feeling she felt in her gut grew and grew as the manhunt dragged on over days, then weeks and then months. Naturally, she was consumed by the need to reunite with her children. But at some point, a person has to eat and go to work so they don’t end up on the street. And so, they learn to compartmentalize.

Living With Loss

This is how Emily lived for four years. One part of her mind held on to the grief, which threatened to overwhelm her constantly. In the other part of her mind she controlled the basic functions of eating, sleeping and working.

Then, her husband was found, in Mexico. He was apprehended and her children, found. And her newfound ability to live one day at a time had prepared her for another long journey: the awkward process of reconnecting with the children she hadn’t seen in almost four years.

Her story today, on KUOW Presents.

Other stories on KUOW Presents, Thursday, April 18:

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Drug Enforcement
12:18 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

More Medical Marijuana Regulations Proposed

Do you agree with stricter medical marijuana regulations?
Flickr Photo/Dominic Simpson

With all the talk about the legalization of marijuana perhaps you’ve been caught in a haze and haven’t been paying attention to what is going on with Washington’s long legal medical marijuana. Well changes are being proposed there too. Washington Senator Ann Rivers has proposed legislation that would task the Liquor Control Board with licensing and regulating medical marijuana dispensaries, processors and growers. Ann Rivers talks to Ross Reynolds about why she thinks further regulation is necessary.

Sports News
12:17 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Why Are The Mariners Getting Into The Television Business?

What will change now that the Mariners own a cable network?
Flickr Photo/Ed and Eddie

The Seattle Mariners are likely to see an increase in future revenue now that they’ve purchased a controlling interest in ROOT Sports Northwest — the cable network that broadcasts their games. Up until now, the Mariners have been required to share their TV revenue with other major league baseball teams. By controlling their TV rights the Mariners will be able to keep much of that revenue for themselves.

So how will this impact their success on the field? How has this worked out for other teams? Ross Reynolds talks with sports editor for The Nation, Dave Zirin.

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High School Education
12:15 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Pass A Citizenship Test To Graduate?

It’s not just math anymore, students are falling behind in history and civics too. A new report by independent, non-partisan research organization — the Pioneer Institute — says the state of US history and civics education is so abysmal that it makes “reading, mathematics and science achievement seem robust by comparison.” Washington state’s record isn’t any better. The state received a D grade from educational excellence organization, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, for its quote “meager” US history standards.

To reverse this trend the Pioneer Institute report recommends a simple policy: require high school graduates to pass the US citizenship test. Ross Reynolds talks with Sandra Stotsky, professor of education reform and one of the authors of this report.

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