More from KUOW

RadioActive Youth Media
10:42 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Fighting Foreclosure And Finding Forgiveness

Natalie Johnson, new home owner.
KUOW Photo/Kendra Hanna

Today on the program, Maddie Ewbank and Srikar Penumaka bring you stories about moving on in life: letting go and gaining in the process.

First, Kendra Hanna tells you about one family's struggle with their home and foreclosure. Ever had buyer's remorse? Well this is a little different. After that, we hear from Ian Dangla about how a high school play helped a family change its perspective on the death penalty.

RadioActive is KUOW's youth radio program, and all the stories here are produced by young people age 16-21. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook.

Canada, Culture, Commerce
10:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

News From Canada, Robert Horton On Film, And Tech News

Flickr Photo/Alex Indigo (CC BY-NC-ND)

Les Layne from the Victoria Time Colonist brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton joins us with a look at the movies. Then, Todd Bishop brings us the latest business and technology news.  

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Traffic Safety
9:46 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Rules Of The Road

Stacey Sanner

Do pedestrians always have the right of way? Really? Always? Is it illegal to pass a city bus on the right? What is the speed limit in a neighborhood if no signs are posted? Ross Reynolds sits down with former Seattle traffic officer John Abraham to take listener questions about the rules of the road. 

Government
9:33 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Why Can't Congress Make Progress?

Flickr Photo/Jonathon Colman

This year’s Congress is the most unproductive in at least 60 years. In its first six months, the 113th Congress has passed only 22 bills through both the House and the Senate, and most of those were insignificant. Is the hold up just part of the democratic process? Or is it something else?

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper says the push for transparency in recent years is making government and lawmakers less effective. His solution? Bring back closed-door meetings and earmarks. Ross Reynolds talks with Julien Zelizer, professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University about why transparency and the 24-hour news cycle can fuel partisan gridlock. 

Peaches
9:19 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Getting Fresh With Ross And Sheryl: What A Peach!

Collins Family Orchards peaches
Courtesy of Sheryl Wiser

This week Ross Reynolds talks with Sheryl Wiser of Cascade Harvest about the ever complicated peach. How do you find a good one? She explains and then tells us what to do with our new plump and pretty peaches! From salsa to the grill, Sheryl sets us up for peach season. 

Nature Conservancy
9:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Violence In Egypt, PacMed Building And Peter Kareiva

Flickr Photo/Madison Guy

Violence Erupts In Egypt
Egyptian troops moved into Cairo to break up the anti-government protests today. The country has declared a state of emergency as violence escalates. Kristen Chick is the Cairo correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor. She reports on the latest.   

What's Moving Into The PacMed Building?
Community college classroom space or view apartments? The public agency that owns the Pacific Medical Center atop Beacon Hill decided which one will occupy the art deco former military hospital on Tuesday night. The Pacific Hospital Preservation and Development Authority looked at proposals from Seattle Central Community College and a Miami-based developer. We talk with PHPDA executive director Rosemary Aragon.

Re-Thinking Conservation
For much of its existence The Nature Conservancy has bought acres upon acres of land to protect it from human development. Peter Kareiva, the chief scientist for The Nature Conservancy, believes a different philosophy is needed in order to deal with the “Age of Man.” He explains his conservation ideas and what a new study on climate change and nature can tell us about resilient environments.

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Violence In Cairo
8:29 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Egypt Declares National Emergency

A protester comes to the aid of a wounded comrade as security forces clear a sit-in by supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in the eastern Nasr City district of Cairo August 14.
AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa

Egypt's presidency has declared a state of emergency after scores of people were killed when security forces stormed protest camps in Cairo.

The camps had been occupied by supporters of former president Mohammed Morsi, who was deposed in early July.

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Civil Rights History
4:43 am
Wed August 14, 2013

A Postman's 1963 Walk For Justice, Cut Short On An Alabama Road

Civil rights activist William Moore made several one-man marches for racial equality. In April 1963, he was killed during a march from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss.
Baltimore Sun

In April of 1963, a Baltimore mailman set off to deliver the most important letter in his life — one he wrote himself. William Lewis Moore decided to walk along Highway 11 from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., hoping to hand-deliver his letter to Gov. Ross Barnett. Moore wanted Barnett to fundamentally change Mississippi's racial hierarchy — something unthinkable for a Southern politician at the time.

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Demographics
10:46 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Does Fewer Kids Mean Less Kid Friendly? Raising Children In Jet City

Flickr Photo/Michael Hanscom

 Seattle has one of the lowest populations of children in the United States. What does it mean when a city goes from a playground for kids to a playground for the rich? Ross Reynolds talks with Ali Modarres, professor of urban geography at California State University and co-author of a new report on the Childless City. And listeners answer the questions: Do you think is a bad place to raise kids? Did you leave the city to raise your kids in Shoreline or Bellevue? 

Science
10:36 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Humans Look Forward To Turning Into Robots

Tali Sharot's book "The Optimism Bias"

  Are you optimistic about the future of science? A recent Pew Survey found that 71 percent of Americans believe artificial arms and legs will perform better than natural ones by 2050, and 69 percent believe there will be a cure for most forms of cancer by then.

Will most Americans be springing for artificial limbs in 40 years? Maybe not. But we are certainly optimistic about the possibility of it all. Ross Reynolds talks with Tali Sharot, research fellow in the department of cognitive, perceptual and brain sciences at University College London and the author of “The Optimism Bias: A Tour of the Irrationally Positive Brain.”

Smoking Prevention
10:31 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Health Department To Teens: 'Suck On This'

Courtesy of Suck on This Facebook page

  If you saw a teenager walking down the street wearing a neon t-shirt with the phrase “Suck on This” printed across the chest, your mind might not automatically think that they are trying to spread a message to other teens to stay away from tobacco. Teens taking part in an awareness campaign with the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department are saying "suck on this" and they aren't trying to offend anyone. Ross Reynolds talks about the new anti-tobacco campaign with a representative from the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department. 

Health Care
10:20 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Cutting Through Obamacare Rollout Confusion

 The pace of implementation for the Affordable Care Act, known by critics and the president himself as Obamacare, is picking up this fall. Starting October 1 you can start shopping for a health plan in Washington state's new insurance exchange called Healthplanfinder. Obamacare is supposed to be fully in place by early next year. But there’s still a lot of confusion. Ross Reynolds tries to cut through some of that confusion by talking with Washington state Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler and taking listener calls.

Greendays
10:00 am
Tue August 13, 2013

The Transportation Package, Letters Written In Wartime And Gardening

Flickr Photo/Mark Atwood

  

Olympia And The Transportation Package
When state lawmakers adjourned in June, they left a $10 billion transportation package on the table. Now, senate leaders have announced they’ll hold hearings in the fall on the state’s transportation priorities and how to pay for them. Everett Herald reporter and columnist Jerry Cornfield joins us with details.
 

Letters Written In Wartime
Wartime letters capture a uniquely vivid history not found in text books. They place us in the author’s shoes. Take this quote from a letter written in 1941: “A man just brought us our gas masks. I don’t know why I’m writing this, because if we’re hit with a bomb they won’t find enough of me — let alone this letter. I imagine it’s to show myself that I can be calm under fire.”  We experience history by reading the letters of those who lived it.


Greendays Gardening Panel
Our gardening panel includes a flower expert, native plant expert and vegetable gardening expert.  They’re on hand to answer your gardening questions. 

RadioActive Youth Media
9:25 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Identity Crisis

Jen is an average teenage girl, with a twist.
Courtesy of Jen

For our last week of the summer we bring you stories of change, challenge and identity!

Hosts Carlos Nieto and Isaac Noren speak about what it means to be themselves and how others view them. Isaac Noren takes us into to the mind of a girl born in the wrong body and tells us about how she’s adjusting to her new life. Then Srikar Penumaka gives us an inside look on a religious refugee from Bhutan, how he’s adapted to American culture and how he’s slowly trying to bring his two worlds together through technology.

Hopefully today's podcast will make you think about who you are and where you come from.

RadioActive is KUOW's youth radio program, and all the stories here are produced by young people age 16-21. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook.

Interfaith Amigos
9:00 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Metro Driver Safety, Gay Rights In Russia And The Interfaith Amigos

Metro Driver Safety
Yesterday morning in downtown Seattle, a Metro bus driver was shot and wounded by a passenger. While assaults on Metro drivers have decreased overall since 2006, there were still 107 incidents last year. What is Metro doing to keep drivers safe? And what affect has ending the ride-free-zone downtown had on driver safety? Dow Constantine is the King County Executive. He joins us from the Ryerson Base in SODO.

Gay Rights In Russia
According to a recent survey by the Pew Research Center, only 16 percent of Russians say homosexuality should be accepted by society. In another survey conducted a nonprofit Russian research center this spring, nearly 35 percent of Russians believe that homosexuality is a disease.

Recently, the Russian government has been legislating against gay rights. In June, the government passed a law that prohibits the distribution of so-called “homosexual propaganda” to minors. Protests are gaining momentum in the United States to dump Russian vodka and even boycott the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. What are the historical and cultural factors that have influenced Russian attitudes toward homosexuality?

Interfaith Amigos
Death is something we all need to grapple with. The Three Interfaith Amigos join us with a look at what religion has to say about mortality and the afterlife. They’ll also respond to the common accusation from the non-religious: That God is just a story to make people feel better about life and death.   

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

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