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More from KUOW

KUOW PHOTO/BOND HUBERMAN

Does a $17,000 security fee infringe on free speech on the University of Washington campus? Is it "hostile architecture" when the city of Seattle uses fences and bike racks to keep people from camping in public areas? Did West Seattle homeowners pay enough of a cost for cutting down city-owned trees to enhance their views? And does Paul Allen play and sing as good as Jimi Hendrix? Quincy Jones thinks so.

Protesters crowd into the University of Washington's Red Square on Friday, January 20, 2017 during a speech by Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Last year the University of Washington's College Republicans invited former Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos to campus. Yiannopoulos is a conservative and provocative speaker whose speeches and rallies often draw protests. The night he spoke at the University of Washington those protests turned violent.

This year when the College Republicans decided to hold a rally with the Patriot Prayer group, the university told them to pay a $17,000 security fee.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018
SIFF Egyptian (map)
Doors at 6:30 pm, Show at 7:00 pm
Buy Tickets Here
$10 for General Admission, $5 for KUOW member/Student/Senior (55+)

Join KUOW Public Radio and guests for a lively debate on a bold proposition: "Amazon is good for Seattle." Moderated by Ross Reynolds, a panel of smart Seattleites will attempt to convince the audience to join their side.

Limebike employees relocate bikes so that they're legally parked.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

There are five bike share companies operating in Dallas, Texas. And they all just got marching orders from the city: Find a way to clean up your products, or we'll impound them. 

The Record: Thursday, February 8, 2018

Feb 8, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

I say bike share, you say ... eyesore? Or worse, public hazard? What should Seattle do about those thousands of candy-colored bicycles all across our city? We talk with Dallas News columnist Robert Wilonski, attorney and disability advocate Conrad Reynoldson, former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn and KUOW listeners.

Courtesy of Libby Lewis Photography

Seattle-based writer Ijeoma Oluo has been widely recognized for some time now as a person who speaks sometimes uncomfortable truths about racism in America. That recognition reached a crescendo in recent days with the release of her first book, “So You Want to Talk About Race.”

Courtesy of Josh Patterson

In a parallel universe, poets stand on street corners and recite for us. We stop what we’re doing and gather together with friends and strangers to listen. Then we pay them some tribute and go on with our days, moved and enriched in some way.

The Record: Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Feb 7, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

We say we don't want children looking at screens too much. But how much is too much? And how can parents limit screen time without an exhausting fight that makes kids stop listening? We'll look for answers with NPR's Anya Kamenetz, author of "The Art of Screen Time," and Seattle filmmaker and physician Delaney Ruston ("Screenagers").

The yes light is on.
Flickr Photo/Jeremy Brooks (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/prQbnr

University of Washington sociologist Pepper Schwartz says the takeaway from the allegations against Aziz Ansari is that we should talk about sex before having it. She sat down with Bill Radke to discuss why that is and some of the social programming that gets in the way.

The Record: Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Feb 6, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

A group of West Seattle homeowners who had city-owned trees cut down to open up their views have reached a settlement. Is it enough to punish and deter? And should we read their names on the air? Bill Radke talks with Seattle City Councilmember Lisa Herbold.

Closeup of a peacock feather.
Flickr Photo/Gary Riley (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/ETAn4o

Last week's viral story of an ersatz emotional support peacock sent waves of hilarity ricocheting across the internet and late night talk shows. But The New York Times' David Leonhardt argues that the creeping normalization of little lies - such as falsehoods about our pets being support or service animals - has a corrosive effect on society over time. Was Dexter the peacock in the coal mine? Bill Radke spoke with Leonhardt to find out.

The Record: Monday, February 5, 2018

Feb 5, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

State lawmakers are halfway through their session. KUOW's Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins tells us what this year's Democrat-controlled legislature is doing for Democrats.

berries
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

More women are speaking out about sexual abuse and harassment as part of the renewed #MeToo movement.

But for the women picking the fruits and vegetables we buy at local supermarkets, talking about daily abuse isn’t easy.

Dancer and choreographer Bill T. Jones at UW's Kane Hall, January 30, 2018.
Courtesy of Emile Pitre

"Art is going to save us, right?" Choreographer Bill T. Jones opens his talk. He says it’s not a laugh line. His answer is sobering.

In the iconoclastic world of modern dance, Bill T. Jones has long searched for answers to questions like, “What is love? What is death? And what does art have to do with it?” He explores those themes in this talk “Analogy/Form: Finding Meaning in Confusing Times.”

kids drawings
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Compost-pooping robot dog! Smog-cleaning penguins! Treehouses! Wikes (wind + bikes)!!! 

Those are just a few of the fantastic and whimsical ideas submitted to our drawing contest that asked kids to imagine one way Seattle can save energy.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

The Amazon spheres: corporate hype or a Seattle icon to rival the Space Needle? We'll tell you what we learned from a behind-the-scenes look at the end of former Seattle mayor Ed Murray's career. And a controversial FBI memo is finally released -- we'll see what all the dossier is about. Also, would you pay $40 for custom Sasquatch license plates?

Washington state poets laureate Claudia Castro Luna and Tod Marshall.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

When you're the poet laureate of Washington state, you log a lot of time on the road. "I got a new car for the job," laughs Tod Marshall. It came to him with 12,000 miles on it, and is now hovering around 57,000 as he hangs up his traveling hat.

The Record: Thursday, February 1, 2018

Feb 1, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

The Seattle Times has published emails and text messages that give an idea how child sex abuse allegations against former Mayor Ed Murray played out behind the scenes in city government. We'll get the story from reporter Lewis Kamb.

Read these lyrics about regret from incarcerated youth

Feb 1, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/Lila Kitaeff

Two young men created this song at the Echo Glen Children's Center, a maximum security facility in Snoqualmie, in a series of workshops with RadioActive Youth Media. This was RadioActive's first workshop at Echo Glen.


Courtesy of Jamie Rand Imaging/Jamie Colman

The second annual Women’s March was celebrated in Seattle on January 20. Organizers say as many as 100,000 people attended. But those organizers had more in mind than a one-day march. They want to make a change.

Dexter the peacock did not get to fly the friendly skies.
Photo courtesy Dexter the Peacock via Instagram screenshot/www.instagram.com/dexterthepeacock/

This week a woman and her peacock were turned away from a cross-country flight. She'd pleaded that Dexter was an emotional support animal, to no avail. And now the most regal road movie in existence is taking place as the pair drives to Los Angeles instead. But sneaking untrained animals onto planes and into restaurants is no snickering matter, and could soon be subject to civil penalties in Washington state.

The Record: Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Jan 31, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

We'll catch you up on some ideas coming from your state lawmakers, including fining people who try to fake having an emotional support animal to get their dog into restaurants and hotels, and making Sasquatch the official state cryptid (that's a creature whose existence has not been proven or disproven by science) in order to raise money for state parks by selling sweet custom 'Squatch license plates.

Today on The Record we're looking at the #MeToo and Time's Up movements here in Washington state. How did we get here and what we can do next?

Michael Perera speaking at a "Why We Stayed Here" event at Theatre Off Jackson on January 17, 2018.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Michael Perera gave this talk as part of a KUOW-sponsored  “Why We Stayed Here” event that took place at Theatre Off Jackson on January 17. It has been edited and republished with permission.

I started putting this talk together the day after it was announced that someone who lives in Seattle is officially the richest person of all time.

I’m guessing it’s not one of the people in this room. But if it is, can you give me a ride home?

'The Legend of Bigfoot' is a store along Highway 101 in northern California.
Flickr Photo/Amit Patel (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dAdW3o

Bigfoot might not be real, but he's a heck of a fundraiser. We are forever fascinated with that critter and now a Washington state senator wants to harness that fascination to help maintain Washington state parks. 

Amazon Spheres, downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

If you've driven through South Lake Union in the last seven years, you have probably seen the structures emerge. Three round orbs made of steel and glass were filled with 40,000 plants from nearly 30 different countries to create an urban rainforest. 

The Record: Monday, January 29, 2018

Jan 29, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

When you think Seattle landmark, you think Space Needle, right? But could you eventually think of the new Amazon Spheres? We'll discuss with The Stranger's Charles Mudede and architect and FORM magazine publisher Ann Gray.

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

This week, an Amtrak engineer said he didn't see the signs telling him to slow down before last month's fatal derailment near Tacoma. Amazon opened a convenience store with no checkout lines. Sound Transit might lose a bunch of car-tab tax money. And Edgar Martinez might want to hit Hall of Fame voters with a light bat.

Seattle Emeralds, Seattle Eagles and yes, Seattle Kraken are only a few of the newly registered domain names that could hold clues about what a possible Seattle NHL team might be called. Bill Radke bounces some possibilities off VanLive reporter (and Canucks fan) Harrison Mooney.

Patricia Murphy / KUOW

Is Washington state going to put an end to capital punishment?

The death penalty has been on hold since 2014 when Governor Inslee declared a moratorium on executions.

Hear an update on what lawmakers are up to from Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins. 

First, KUOW's Patricia Murphy was a media witness at the execution of the last person to put to death by the state.

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