More from KUOW

Cary Chin works Wed. at the front desk of Seattle-based Gravity Payments. CEO Dan Price told his employees this week that he was cutting his own salary and using company profits so they would each earn a base salary of $70,000.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

A Seattle CEO cuts his own pay so he can double his employees’ salaries – is this a new model for capitalism? Should Washington state tax the megarich? Does Woodland Park Zoo deserve a boycott?

Bill Radke hosts our weekly news debate with panelists C.R. Douglas of KCPQ13, former state Senate Majority Leader Bill Finkbeiner and Seattlish blogger Hanna Brooks Olsen.

The only surviving photo of the Cambodian genocide from Charles Som Nguyen's family. Pictured are his aunt and uncle.
Courtesy of Charles Som Nguyen

When Charles Som Nguyen was a kid in Oregon, his mom would occasionally tell stories over dinner about her home country of Cambodia.  More often than not, she wouldn’t recount happy memories.

Instead, she would tell stories about living in labor camps, of running away while bodies fell and bullets whizzed past her ears, of finding her own sister dead.

Woodland Park Zoo
Flickr Photo/Jug Jones (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Mike Keele, the former director of elephants habitats at the Oregon Zoo, about why he feels zoos are important. 

Note: On Monday The Record will interview Dr. Kathryn Gillespie of the University of Washington. She explains why we should rethink zoos. 

Micrsoft technology
Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Dr. Annette Estes, the director of University of Washington's autism center, about employing people with autism.

Desk school education
Flickr Photo/alamosbasement (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., about the revised No Child Left Behind bill she crafted with Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.

UW To Give Minority Law Students A Helping Hand

Apr 16, 2015
University of Washington Law School
Flickr Photo/Eric E Johnson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Kellye Testy, dean of the University of Washington Law School, about their Gregoire Fellows program. The program aims to boost diversity in the law school and the legal profession.

Real Change Street Paper Goes Digital

Apr 16, 2015

Bill Radke speaks with Tim Harris, founding director of Real Change, about the newspaper's decision to offer a digital edition to readers.

The Holocaust memorial in Berlin.
Flickr Photo/Rodrigo David (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with 89-year-old Holocaust survivor Sonia Warshawski and her granddaughter, Seattle-based filmmaker Leah Warshawski.

In this 2012 file photo, Troy Kelley, the Democratic candidate for state auditor at the time, takes questions at a debate.
Flickr Photo/Daniel Brunell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins and local attorney Bob Chadwell about the unfolding story of Washington state auditor Troy Kelley's indictment and what the legal ramifications could be.

Katherine Switz, founder of the Stability Network.
Courtesy of Katherine Switz

When a GermanWings passenger jet slammed into the French Alps last month, killing all aboard, attention focused on the co-pilot’s treatment for severe depression – and how he hid his illness.

An estimated 58 percent of Americans don’t want people with mental health issues in their workplace, even though a vast majority of people with such illnesses can work just fine.

An Orca performs at a SeaWorld location in 2008.
Flickr Photo/Jeff Kraus (CC-BY-NC-ND)

John Hargrove was an Orca trainer for 14 years, mainly at SeaWorld. Shortly after quitting the company he gained attention for his part in the documentary "Blackfish." The film chronicles conditions at SeaWorld theme parks and the death of Dawn Brancheau, a SeaWorld trainer killed by an Orca in 2010.

Donnie Wilburn, who is blind, and her husband Bob Wilburn observe a depiction of the Battle of Little Bighorn at the Seattle Art Museum with the help of a vivid description from museum docent laureate Suzanne Ragen.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Camille Jassny listens raptly as docent Suzanne Ragen creates a mind’s-eye picture of a work at the Seattle Art Museum.

Jassny is vision-impaired – it’s not easy for people like her to access the rich history and cultural  legacy handed down through art, from Roman statuary to Native American beaded moccasins.

“I can’t independently go into a museum. I can’t really read anything. I can’t walk along and look,” she says. “So for me, the difference is the docent brings each piece of art to life.”

People do better on tests of alertness and motor performance after power naps, says Dr. James Hamblin, health columnist at The Atlantic. But he says he's not a supporter of napping every day at work.
Flickr Photo/bark (CC BY 2.0)

This week an Alaska Airlines baggage handler fell asleep in the cargo hold of an airplane before takeoff, forcing an emergency landing at Sea-Tac Airport. (Nobody was hurt.) Should we take more naps at work? Bill Radke asked Dr. James Hamblin, senior editor and health columnist at The Atlantic.

Students at the Fiddleheads, an outdoor school at the Washington Park Arboretum.
Fiddleheads Family Nature School

Seattle is beginning to experiment with an unorthodox concept – outdoor preschool.

All day, all year round. Three- and 4-year-old kids would learn outside and in parks. It's more than recess – it's an outdoor classroom.

Marcie Sillman talks with Houston Chronicle energy policy reporter Jennifer Dlouhy about Shell's plans to explore Arctic oil and gas drilling this summer.

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