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'Week in Review' panel Joni Balter, Michael Maddux, Kim Malcolm and John Carlson.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Amazon is donating a building a temporary homeless shelter in Seattle. What role should the business community play in solving homelessness? Also, the troubled Western State Hospital has a new CEO. Will that help solve it's problems? And, should Washington ditch the sales tax in favor of an income tax?

Kim Malcolm chats over the news of the week with Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, KVI's John Carlson and Michael Maddux, chair of the King County Young Democrats.

Ross Reynolds and Mara Liasson at a KUOW event in March, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

NPR national politics correspondent Mara Liasson spoke March 31 at Seattle Town Hall about political trends in this election cycle. 

She was then joined by a panel of local communications experts to discuss the challenges news organizations and journalists face in a shifting media landscape. The panel included: Seattle Times editor Kathy Best, KUOW president and general manager Caryn Mathes, GeekWire co-founder John Cook and Providence Health Services and Swedish Hospital executive Dan Dixon.

The Record: Thursday, April 14, Full Show

Apr 14, 2016
Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

Amazon's welcoming some homeless families into one of its buildings. We'll talk about why and hear Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's reaction. 

We also visit Central Washington, where Yakima is reeling after five people were shot dead in two weeks. We'll hear how people are trying to figure out a way forward.

And hear the story of one man who has spent four decades resettling refugees in Seattle.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Yakima City Council (clockwise from top left): Mayor Avina Gutierrez, Holly Cousens, Carmen Mendez, Dulce Gutierrez, Maureen Adkison, Bill Lover, and Kathy Coffey.
Yakima City Council

Kim Malcolm speaks with Yakima City Councilmember Carmen Mendez about how the city is dealing with five gun deaths in the last two weeks.  

The romance of vinyl records.
Flickr Photo/Jonas Smith (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/qtdqN5

Kim Malcolm talks to Martin Feveyear, music producer and mixer for Jupiter Recording Studio in Seattle, about why vinyl records have withstood the rise of digital musical.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Kim Malcolm talks to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about Amazon's announcement that it will be turning one of its vacant South Lake Union buildings into a homeless shelter in partnership with Mary's Place. 

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Gnl1gl

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle Times Reporter Ángel González about Amazon's announcement that it will establish a temporary shelter for homeless families near their South Lake Union headquarters.

The online retail giant will partner with local homeless service provider Mary's Place to temporarily re-purpose an existing real estate holding — an empty Travelodge — while the land it sits on waits to be developed. The shelter will house around 60-70 homeless families for one year.

Bob Johnson started at the International Rescue Committee (IRC) in San Francisco, in 1976. He took charge of the Seattle office in 1977, and led the organization for decades, until his retirement in 2016.
Courtesy of Bob Johnson

Bill Radke speaks with Bob Johnson, former executive director of the International Rescue Committee in Seattle, about what it was like to settle refugees in our region for nearly four decades. Johnson retired from his position earlier this year.

Courtesy of Kamna Shastri

I’m the black sheep in my family.

Scratch that - I’m actually more of a white sheep.

Here’s what a family photo would look like: my mom, dad, and brother, each with their own wonderful shade of brown. And then there’s me: pale, white, and blond haired.

Kim Malcolm speaks with AP reporter Martha Belisle about the problems at Washington state's largest psychiatric hospital and why Governor Jay Inslee fired the chief of Western State Hospital.

KUOW Photo

Governor Inslee fired the head of Western State Hospital Tuesday. AP reporter Martha Bellisle tells us what the new chief will have on her plate.

Also, you'll hear from two grade school Seattle sisters whose science project got them an invitation to the White House.

And the creator of a new PBS children's show tells us how his childhood growing up between Seattle and Fidalgo Island influenced his work.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Rebecca Yeung (left), and Kimberly Yeung retrieve the Loki Lego Launcher outside Ritzville, WA, after the ballooncraft returned from the stratosphere.
Courtesy of the Yeung Family

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle sisters Rebecca, 11, and Kimberly Yeung, 9, about bringing their "spacecraft," the Loki Lego Launcher, to the White House Science Fair

Before the White House, the Loki Lego Launcher was just a family project. The girls built the craft at home, with equipment and instructions they found online. They made it out of plywood, arrow shafts, rope, a helium balloon and some styrofoam feet "in the event of a water landing." 

Poet Quenton Baker
Courtesy of Helen Peppe

Elizabeth Austen talks to Seattle poet Quenton Baker about his mentor, Tim Seibles. 

A scene from 'Ready, Jet, Go!'
YouTube

Bill Radke speaks with Washington native Craig Bartlett about how his childhood around Puget Sound influenced the creation of his new PBS Kids show, Ready, Jet, Go!

The Bureau of Land Management released a new proposal Tuesday for managing the former Oregon and California Railroad forestlands in Western Oregon.

The so-called “O&C Lands” have traditionally been used to generate money for local counties, but since the 1990s, those revenues have been shrinking.

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