More from KUOW

The Record: Tuesday, Oct 11th, full show

16 hours ago
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Today is the deadline for Jungle residents to leave. City and State Officials are clearing out the homeless encampment under I-5 today. KUOW's growth and development reporter Joshua McNichols was there this morning and tells us what "clearing out the Jungle" means.

Also, why is the National Federation of Republican Women sticking by Donald Trump after his comments about groping women? We talk to Whatcom County's Eileen Sobjack, an officer with the organization, explains their stance.

And Nancy Pearl gives us our weekly reading assignment.

Listen to the full show above or check out one of the stories:

Flickr Photo/Eierschneider (CC BY 2.0)/

Bill Radke talks with Dan Ericson, a football coach for Klahowya Secondary School in Silverdale, Washington. In light of four schools forfeiting against the "dangerously large" football team from Everett's Archbishop Murphy High School, Ericson explains that the rules are to blame. He sees a system that penalizes public schools, and harms teens who play all sports. 

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Some books are page turners; other require a little more concentration. Nancy Pearl tells KUOW's Marcie Sillman that Carol Black's novel "Orphans of the Carnival" is not an easy read, but the effort pays off in the end.

The Record: Monday, Oct 10th, Full Show

Oct 10, 2016
KUOW Photo

New York Times columnist Tim Egan reviews the presidential debate and the state of this election year. Maria Semple talks about her new book, "Today Will Be Different." We'll talk about the importance of Indigenous People's Day. And finally, should a  failed experiment with homeless camping in Portland make its way to Seattle?

Matt Remle drafted the resolution adopted by the Seattle City Council recognizing the ongoing negative consequences of the American Indian boarding schools
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Monday is Seattle's third annual celebration of Indigenous People's Day. We asked members of our local indigenous community to share what it means to them. 

Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood in Portland, Oregon.
Flickr Photo/Dan (CC BY NC 2.0)/

Bill Radke speaks with Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter Amelia Templeton about Portland's failed experiment to allow homeless individuals to camp on public land. The Seattle City Council is considering a similar proposal. 

Paige Parsons

Ross Reynolds interviews Arlie Hochschild, professor of sociology at the University of California Berkeley, about her new book, “Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right", which has just been listed as a finalist for a 2016 National Book Award in Non-Fiction.

Hochschild spent five years among low income people in rural Louisiana in order to understand the conservative movement. 

'Week in Review' panel Josh Feit, Sarah Stuteville, Joni Balter and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Are liberal lobbyists writing Seattle's laws? Should Washington put a carbon tax on fossil fuels? And what can Vancouver, B.C. teach Seattle about safe injection sites for drug users?

We'll talk about these stories and more on KUOW's Week in Review. Listen to the live discussion Fridays at noon and follow the online discussion @KUOW and #KUOWwir. 

Sandbox Radio actors Mik Kuhlman, Rebecca Olson, Keith Dahlgren and Eric Ray Anderson.
Courtesy of John Ulman

Sandbox Radio is back on Speakers Forum! Our presentation of their latest work, "Gold Rush,"  includes the following performances: 

Bill Radke speaks with Kyle Murphy and Ellicott Dandy about Initiative 732, which will appear on the November ballot. The initiative would introduce a carbon tax with the goal of reducing carbon emissions.

Murphy is with the Yes on 732 campaign and he wants you to vote for the initiative. Dandy is the economic and environmental justice manager for progressive group OneAmerica, she wants you to vote no. 

You remember the protesters occupying the Malheur Wildlife Reserve in Oregon, they said the Federal Government has no right to own vast amounts of land here in the west. Well their leader Ammon Bundy is on trial and you'll hear how that's going.

Also, should the Seattle Police Department be using software that can monitor your social media posts?

And creepy clowns are haunting the Puget Sound area. Some say it's disturbing, some say it's a publicity stunt. How did clowns become something everyone calls scary?

Bill Radke sits down with Sunlight Foundation staff writer Libby Watson to discuss the debate between vice presidential candidates Tim Kaine and Mike Pence Tuesday night. Watson explains that neither candidate really wanted to educate viewers on what they would actually do for the country, and the media was focused on spectacle over substance. 

Courtesy of OPB/Amanda Peacher

Bill Radke speaks with Oregon Public Broadcasting's Ryan Haas about the trial over the occupation of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge earlier this year. 

Afraid of clowns? There's a word for that

Oct 5, 2016
Flickr Photo/Stefan Powell (CC BY 2.0)/

The creepy clowns story has finally made it to Seattle.

This week a clown was seen walking around Green Lake at dusk. People described it as covered in blood with a choking device around its neck. Seattle Schools sent a warning to parents yesterday to keep an eye out.

Kevin Boggs in his tent in the Jungle. He moved into the Jungle on Dec. 1 last winter after moving down from Lake City where his tent had been repeatedly ransacked.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Kevin Boggs is trying to find a way out of the Jungle, the large homeless camp under Interstate 5 in Seattle. But it's not that easy. Listen to some of his story to hear what he's doing in his search for stable housing.