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More from KUOW

KUOW PHOTO/KARA MCDERMOTT

The debate over civil discourse reaches from a Virginia restaurant to the White House to a roommate-wanted ad for a Seattle house share. The Supreme Court wraps up its term with a string of conservative victories and a retirement that could influence the U.S. legal system for a generation. A $50 million cost overrun threatens the future of Seattle's streetcar.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Why are women underrepresented in computer science? Is is systemic forces? Or personal preference? We speak to a University of Washington lecturer who says it's the latter, and the executive director of Ada Academy who says it's the former.

Display with system code.
Flickr Photo/Yuri Samoilov (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2N9a7jN

Bill Radke talks to Stuart Reges, principal lecturer at the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science about his essay, "Why Women Don't Code," saying women are underrepresented in computer science because of personal preferences. We're also joined by Nicole Buchanan, executive director of Ada Developers Academy.

In our conversation, Reges and Buchanan discuss what they see as the factors that do or do not lead women to go into computer science and tech, and the work they're both doing to bring women into the field and ensure they're supported.

Roxane Gay speaks at TEDWomen2015 - Momentum, May 27-29, 2015, Monterey Conference Center, Monterey, California, USA.
Flickr Photo/TED-Marla Aufmuth/TED (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ybtHLA

Recent polling shows that almost half of American women say they’ve been sexually assaulted.

With that startling statistic in mind, KUOW presents this talk with author Roxane Gay, who compiled a collection of personal essays called, “Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture.” It addresses a misogynistic culture in which victims of violence are often discredited, mocked or shamed for their assault.

The author (left) with his sister. They were adopted from South Korea by white parents.
KUOW PHOTO/Brian Freeland

I've always known I was adopted because I have white parents. 

In school, people talked about what traits they got from each of their parents: their eyes from their mom, their hair from their dad, their personality a mix of both. I envied them.


File photo of the Supreme Court.
Flickr Photo/Mark Fischer

In a 5-4 ruling the Supreme Court decided that public sector workers don't have to pay a so-called "fair share fee" to the unions that represent them.

One of these sustainable straws might be in your future.
KUOW Photo/Brie Ripley

Nothing is more satisfying than the sweet sound of a straw - a pointy, plastic straw - piercing the seal on a tall cup of bubble tea. But after this weekend, that sound might be harder to come by. Seattle's ban on single use plastics goes into effect on July 1st.

Why the prohibition? How will it be implemented? And most importantly: what about the tea?? Kevin Kelly, general manager of Recology Cleanscapes in Georgetown, came by to help Bill Radke and producer Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong cope with change.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

President Trump is loud. Why is former President Obama quiet? Bill Radke put that question and others to Ben Rhodes, former Obama adviser and speechwriter. Rhodes' new book about his time in the previous administration is called "The World As It Is."


Eula Scott Bynoe and Jeannie Yandel
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

How much money do you make?

Turn and tell a coworker.

If you just cringed, you're like a lot of Americans when it comes to talking about salary at work. But that attitude is hurting us - especially women. KUOW's new podcast, Battle Tactics for Your Sexist Workplace, wants that to change.


FILE: Therese Macisaac of Seattle joins a protest against the travel ban outside the U.S. District Court of Appeals in Seattle in 2017.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Trump’s latest travel ban that barred people entering the U.S. from five majority Muslim countries as well as North Korea and Venezuela.

In the 5-4 decision, the majority opinion stated that the ban fell "squarely within the scope of Presidential authority.”

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

The Supreme Court today upheld the Trump Administration travel ban, which primarily targets people from majority Muslim countries. AP reporter Mark Sherman put the decision into modern-day context. Then Bill Radke spoke to two people: one with memories of the past and one who fears for the future. 

Ichiro Suzuki, special assistant to the chairman of the Seattle Mariners, donned a Bobby Valentine-style disguise and sneaked into the Seattle dugout to watch a bit of the action at Yankee Stadium.
AP Photo/Bill Kostroun

Ichiro Suzuki, the Carmen Sandiego of the Mariners, was spotted last week in the Seattle dugout serving a Super Mario Bros. inspired lewk. Fooling no one, the disguise raised more questions than it answered.


wage gap BTSW
KUOW Graphic/Teodora Popescu; Source: AAUW

There isn't one wage gap all women experience. There are several. Allow us to demonstrate: 

Imagine this jar of 100 Skittles is how much a white cis male coworker — let's call him Gary — is being paid.

A young tyke uses a VR headset.
FLICKR PHOTO/Andri Koolme (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/FrZYUC

Bill Radke talks with Wired's Peter Rubin, author of "Future Presence: How Virtual Reality is Changing Human Connection, Intimacy, and the Limits of Ordinary Life."

Flickr Photo/SP8254 (CC BY-NC-ND)

In light of this month’s finding in favor of the Colorado baker who refused to make a cake for a same-sex wedding, Supreme Court watchers anticipated a similar decision in the case of Arlene’s Flowers in Richland.

That expectation was dashed, as the court declined to rule on the case. Instead, they sent it back to the Washington State Supreme Court to reconsider.

Disguise-ghazi comes to a dugout near you

Jun 25, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

The Supreme Court may have taken the cake earlier this month, but they won’t be arranging the flowers. This morning, the court declined to rule on the lawsuit against Arlene’s Flowers over their refusal to create arrangements for a same-sex wedding. The New York Times’ Adam Liptak explains why.

The OUT@Comcast team members and friends marching in the 2017 Seattle Pride Parade, by Stephen Wong.
Flickr Photo/Comcast Washington State (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2twwHdW

Bill Radke looks at the controversy over the restaurant that asked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to leave. We also talk about the commercialization of Seattle's Pride Parade. Should the event go back to its political roots?

KUOW PHOTO/KRISTIN LEONG

Washington sues the Trump Administration over its policy of separating migrant families at the U.S.-Mexico border, Seattle looks for a new strategy to fund affordable housing, and the University of Washington settles a free speech case.

Plus: Summer's finally here and we're already debating air conditioning. Do you even need it in the Northwest?

Flickr Photo/Howard Ignatius (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nZ4Mz1

In honor of the summer solstice, we asked listeners about their favorite summer songs. You came through with the nostalgic, the playful, and some truly excellent 80s throwbacks. 


Hydroplane racer and stunt pilot Mira Slovak drives the Miss Bardahl.
Flickr Photo/Insomnia Cured Here (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/3aZ9C1

"In America, freedom is like air," said Czech daredevil Mira Slovak. That air was his element - he used it for work, for play, and to make his escape across the Iron Curtain to freedom.


Welcome to summer! What's on your playlist?

Jun 21, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Today is the longest day of the year: the summer solstice. And although it won't be truly summer in Seattle for a few weeks, it's never too early to get started on your list of lazy day jams.

We spoke to music writer Charles R. Cross, checked in with our producers, and heard from many of you with your favorites. (Host Ross Reynolds had an extended dance break to Katy Perry.) One point of consensus? Some of the best summer songs are all about the open road.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee.
Facebook Photo/Governor Jay Inslee

Governor Jay Inslee announced that Washington state is suing the Trump Administration over the family separation policy. Ross Reynolds asked him what that means, when the policy seems to be changing daily.

"We have demonstrated time and time again that this rogue and chaotic administration needs to have the semblance of order and fairness and equity that is given to us by the protection of the judicial system," said Governor Inslee, referring to the state's other lawsuits.

Orcas in the Puget Sound.
Flickr Photo/tifotter (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7SJy6t

In honor of Orca Awareness Month in Washington state, here are three facts about orcas we didn't know before, courtesy of a talk by Prof. Jason Colby of the University of Victoria. 

The author (left) with his friends, discussing the ways food has brought them closer together through the years.
KUOW PHOTO/Patrick Liu

The popularity of cooking shows, food photography, and fine dining testifies to the fact that  in today’s culture our need to eat goes far beyond satisfying a daily nutrition quota. In this four-part podcast, RadioActive’s Patrick Liu delves into a series of vignettes that collectively explore the emotional significance that food brings to the table.


Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Trump administration officials recently retreated on a policy to separate families at the border. Some have blamed past administrations for the stories of chaotic separations and traumatized children; others have pointed to Congress. And then one official claimed divine authority on the matter.


Rep. Derek Kilmer
United States Congress

Bill Radke talks to Congressman Derek Kilmer about the bills up for vote in the House this week, and the new bill introduced by Democrats to address the problem of separating migrant children from their families at the border. We also talk with Domenico Montanaro, NPR lead political editor, about the likelihood that any of these bills pass.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

The Trump administration's policy of separating families at the country's southern border has caused consternation, outrage, and attempts to remedy the harm. Congressman Derek Kilmer, a United States Representative for Tacoma, Kitsap, and the Olympic peninsula, spoke with Bill Radke about what he calls "a question of what kind of country we are." They were joined by NPR lead political editor Domenico Montanaro.

Boxed items are shown on conveyer belts leading to docks where they will be loaded onto trucks at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Geekwire's Todd Bishop about three tech giants that have faced controversy over their contracts with law enforcement and government: Amazon, Microsoft, and Google.

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

How will King County work on homelessness and home prices without money from Seattle's head tax?

King County Executive Dow Constantine discusses his plans for that — and why he wants to spend more public money on the Mariners. 


KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan negotiated a comparmised head tax on big businesses in Seattle, but now the tax has been repealed. So how will the city pay for affordable housing and homeless services now? 

Cartoonist Ellen Forney was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in the late 1990s. She says back then there wasn't much information available, just a lot of stigma. It's an experince she documents in her memoir Marbles. Now she's out with a new book called "Rock Stead: Brilliant Advice From My Bipolar Life."

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