More from KUOW

This week we're making it up as we go

May 27, 2016
'Week in Review' panel Sydney Brownstone, C.R. Douglas, Rob McKenna and Ron Sims.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Seattle's Mayor is combating the city's homeless problem by "making it up as we go." That means, in part, shutting down the homeless encampment known as the Jungle. So where will those people go?

And how did Bernie Sanders go from winning the caucus to losing the primary? 

We'll tackle these subjects and more on Week in Review.

Listen to the live discussion Friday at noon, join in by following @KUOW and using #KUOWwir. Audio and podcast for this show will be available at 3 p.m.

Dr. Ira Helfand at 2013 conference in Oslo, Norway.
Flickr Photo/atomwaffenfrei. jetzt (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e1AiM1

What have we learned from our historic use of nuclear weapons? And given their terrible destructive force, why have we not banned them? 

This talk by Dr. Ira Helfand offers detailed insights into the dangers of nuclear proliferation and war. He covers the risks of the U.S.-Russia and India-Pakistan conflicts, the threat of terrorism, the North Korean wild card, the possibility of an accidental war, and how a modern nuclear war would impact humans and the environment.

Lisa Hallett holding a photo of her husband John
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Mile one: “Oh my God, the babies didn’t stop crying for the last hour and a half.”

Mile two: “I need to buy diapers, what am I going to make for dinner, there’s baby food stuck in the carpet, what am I going to do?”

Mile three and four: “All of a sudden the business and the high energy of that day to day life with young children, it starts to quiet down.”

Mile five: “It’s just quiet, there’s nothing.”

Mile six: “Oh shit, my husband died.”

A Community Talk About The Jungle

May 26, 2016
Tents lined up in the Jungle, which extends north and south under Seattle's Interstate 5 corridor.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Friday, June 3
Seattle Public Library - Central Branch
1000 4th Ave, Seattle WA 98104 (See map
7:00-9:00 p.m. 

Free admission. 

Join KUOW for a deeper dive into the encampment called "The Jungle," including the city's efforts to clean it up, and what the alternatives are for people who live there.

The Record: Thursday, May 26, full show

May 26, 2016
Microphone in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

If your drive into work and this morning was maddeningly slow and congested, stick around. We've got a discussion coming up about whether the city's traffic planning essentially means a war on the single-car driver.

We'll also talk about some possible ways forward that would mean everyone can get where they need to go.

Also, we'll take a look at one of the most restricted places in the state.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Has Seattle declared a war on cars?

May 26, 2016
Traffic on Second Avenue in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1irsJLd

Bill Radke speaks with Brier Dudley about his recent column in the Seattle Times about what he argues is Mayor Ed Murray's attack on single occupancy cars. Also, Tom Fucoloro from the Seattle Bike Blog joins the conversation. He wrote a response to Dudley's article here.

Flickr Photo/Vox Efx (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks with Princeton University political science professor Christopher Achen about his research into how Americans make up their minds when casting a ballot.

Journalist Sonia Shah at her 2013 TED talk in Edinburgh, Scotland.
Flickr Photo/Ted Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/eMH3af

In a 2006 study, 90 percent of epidemiologists predicted a pandemic would kill 165 million people sometime in the next two generations.

Research published this year confirms that threat, and suggests the impacts would be greater than those caused by world war or financial crises. The study concluded that “leaders at all levels have not been giving these threats anything close to the priority they demand.”

Courtesy of Jeff Emtman

Bill Radke speaks with Bethany Denton and Jeff Emtman about their story about the sexually violent predators who reside in the special commitment center on McNeil Island in Washington state.

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about the novel "Imagine Me Gone" by Adam Haslett.

The Record: Wednesday, May 25th, Full Show

May 25, 2016
Sound board studio
KUOW Photo

There was a time when the city of Seattle wouldn't let people call the Jungle home. We'll talk to the man who used to handle the homeless encampment under Interstate 5. 

And you know the trolls, online haters that we're told just not to confront. Seattle writer Lindy West will tell you why she doesn't follow that advice.

Also, Seattle is changing a lot. We'll get a poet's perspective on it.

Listen to the full show above or check out an individual story:

Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle writer Lindy West about her new book, "Shrill: Notes From A Loud Woman." In it West talks about how she found her voice, reclaimed the word "fat" and began fighting misogyny on the internet. 

A camp area at the caves in the north part of the Jungle, Seattle's notorious homeless encampment that leapt onto the map after a fatal shooting in January.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with Jordan Royer about his experience managing the Jungle in the early 2000s. Royer was in charge of dealing with the homeless camp under Interstate 5 under Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels. He said the city can manage the Jungle, but it most likely will never be able to truly shut it down. 

Seattle skyline
Flickr Photo/Steven Santiago (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/q4dpg6

Elizabeth Austen talks to Seattle's first civic poet Claudia Castro Luna about how poetry can be used to talk about the changing city. 

She is holding a series of poetry workshops around Seattle called "The Poet Is In."

The Record: Tuesday, May 24, full show

May 25, 2016
KUOW Photo

You can vote in today's Washington state primary, but it doesn't mean your vote will count for much. What would it take to improve the maddening way we run elections?

Also, Seattle Supersonics legend Spencer Haywood tells you how this city treated him as he challenged the NBA in the U.S. Supreme Court in the 1970s.

And Portland is giving bus tickets out of town for people who are homeless.

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